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Wantage Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Wantage
Old Clove Presbyterian Church
Old Clove Presbyterian Church
Map of Wantage Township in Sussex County. Inset: Location of Sussex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Wantage Township in Sussex County. Inset: Location of Sussex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Wantage Township, New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Wantage Township, New Jersey.
Wantage Township, New Jersey is located in Sussex County, New Jersey
Wantage Township, New Jersey
Wantage Township, New Jersey
Location in Sussex County, New Jersey
Wantage Township, New Jersey is located in New Jersey
Wantage Township, New Jersey
Wantage Township, New Jersey
Location in New Jersey
Wantage Township, New Jersey is located in the United States
Wantage Township, New Jersey
Wantage Township, New Jersey
Location in the United States
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County [[Image:|23x23px|border |]] Sussex
Formed May 30, 1754 (as precinct)
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Named for Wantage, England
Government
 • Type Township
 • Body Township Committee
Area
 • Total 67.48 sq mi (174.78 km2)
 • Land 66.76 sq mi (172.91 km2)
 • Water 0.72 sq mi (1.87 km2)  1.07%
Area rank 18th of 565 in state
2nd of 24 in county
Elevation
538 ft (164 m)
Population
 • Total 11,358
 • Estimate 
(2019)
10,902
 • Rank 215th of 566 in state
4th of 24 in county
 • Density 170.1/sq mi (65.7/km2)
 • Density rank 518th of 566 in state
18th of 24 in county
Time zone UTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
07461
Area code(s) 973
FIPS code 3403776790
GNIS feature ID 0882257
Website

Wantage Township is a township in Sussex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 11,358, reflecting an increase of 971 (+9.3%) from the 10,387 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 900 (+9.5%) from the 9,487 counted in the 1990 Census.

Wantage Township was formed as a precinct on May 30, 1754, from portions of Newton Township. It was incorporated as a township on February 21, 1798, as part of the state's initial group of 104 townships. Boundary exchanges were made with Frankford Township in both 1826 and 1834. Portions of the township were taken on October 14, 1891, to form the Borough of Deckertown (which was renamed to Sussex borough in 1902). The township was named for Wantage, England.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 67.481 square miles (174.776 km2), including 66.753 square miles (172.890 km2) of land and 0.728 square miles (1.886 km2) of water (1.08%). The township is located in the Kittatinny Valley which is a section of the Great Appalachian Valley that stretches for 700 miles (1,100 km) from Canada to Alabama.

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Beemerville, Colesville, Hanford, Lake Neepaulin, Lake Rutherford, Lewisburg, Libertyville, Martins, Mount Salem, Papakating, Plumbsock, Quarryville, Rockport, Roys and Woodbourne.

Rutan Hill, also called Volcanic Hill, located near the Beemerville section of Wantage Township, is New Jersey's only volcanic site that was last active over 440 million years ago.

Rivers and streams in Wantage are tributaries in the Wallkill River watershed, and include:

The township completely surrounds Sussex borough, making it part of 21 pairs of "doughnut towns" in the state, where one municipality entirely surrounds another. Wantage borders the municipalities of Frankford Township, Hardyston Township, Lafayette Township, Montague Township, Sandyston Township and Vernon Township in Sussex County; and both Greenville and Minisink in Orange County, New York.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 2,969
1820 3,307 11.4%
1830 4,034 22.0%
1840 3,908 −3.1%
1850 3,934 0.7%
1860 3,862 −1.8%
1870 3,636 −5.9%
1880 3,361 −7.6%
1890 3,412 1.5%
1900 2,217 −35.0%
1910 2,077 −6.3%
1920 1,898 −8.6%
1930 2,075 9.3%
1940 2,376 14.5%
1950 2,543 7.0%
1960 3,308 30.1%
1970 4,329 30.9%
1980 7,268 67.9%
1990 9,487 30.5%
2000 10,387 9.5%
2010 11,358 9.3%
2019 (est.) 10,902 −4.0%
Population sources:
1810-1920 1840
1850-1870 1850 1870
1880-1890 1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010
* = Lost territory in previous decade.

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 11,358 people, 3,910 households, and 3,116 families residing in the township. The population density was 170.1 per square mile (65.7/km2). There were 4,173 housing units at an average density of 62.5 per square mile (24.1/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 95.23% (10,816) White, 1.21% (137) Black or African American, 0.11% (13) Native American, 0.99% (113) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.93% (106) from other races, and 1.52% (173) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.23% (594) of the population.

There were 3,910 households out of which 34.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.8% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.3% were non-families. 15.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.90 and the average family size was 3.25.

In the township, the population was spread out with 25.0% under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 22.5% from 25 to 44, 32.2% from 45 to 64, and 11.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.2 years. For every 100 females there were 98.6 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 96.7 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $72,270 (with a margin of error of +/− $7,478) and the median family income was $78,934 (+/− $9,462). Males had a median income of $55,509 (+/− $8,605) versus $41,013 (+/− $3,999) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $29,266 (+/− $2,047). About 4.3% of families and 3.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.0% of those under age 18 and 5.3% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 10,387 people, 3,441 households, and 2,856 families residing in the township. The population density was 154.8 people per square mile (59.8/km2). There were 3,663 housing units at an average density of 54.6 per square mile (21.1/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 97.10% White, 0.65% African American, 0.06% Native American, 0.67% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.41% from other races, and 1.10% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.89% of the population.

There were 3,441 households, out of which 43.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 71.5% were married couples living together, 8.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 17.0% were non-families. 13.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.02 and the average family size was 3.33.

In the township the population was spread out, with 29.4% under the age of 18, 7.1% from 18 to 24, 30.0% from 25 to 44, 24.8% from 45 to 64, and 8.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 96.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.0 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $58,440, and the median income for a family was $65,339. Males had a median income of $42,697 versus $30,160 for females. The per capita income for the township was $22,488. About 4.2% of families and 4.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.7% of those under age 18 and 5.2% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

2018-07-26 08 33 51 View north along New Jersey State Route 23 and Sussex County Route 519 just north of Brink Road in Wantage Township, Sussex County, New Jersey
Route 23 and CR 519 northbound concurrency in Wantage Township

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 172.15 miles (277.05 km) of roadways, of which 119.72 miles (192.67 km) were maintained by the municipality, 35.31 miles (56.83 km) by Sussex County and 17.12 miles (27.55 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Route 23, Route 284, CR 519 and CR 565 all pass through the township. Route 284 connects to NY 284, providing access to U.S. Route 6.

Aviation

Sussex Airport, a small general aviation airport, is located in Wantage Township.

Education

Public school students in kindergarten through eighth grade attend the schools of the Sussex-Wantage Regional School District, together with students from Sussex Borough. As of the 2019–20 school year, the district, comprised of three schools, had an enrollment of 1,049 students and 99.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.6:1. Schools in the district (with 2019–20 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics) are Clifton E. Lawrence School in Wantage, with 376 students in grades K - 2, Wantage Elementary School in Wantage, with 340 students in grades 3 - 5 and Sussex Middle School in Sussex, with 328 students in grades 6 - 8.

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students from both Sussex and Wantage attend High Point Regional High School, together with students from Branchville, Frankford Township, Lafayette Township and Montague Township. As of the 2019–20 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 866 students and 76.9 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.3:1. Seats on the high school district's nine-member board of education are allocated based on the population of the constituent municipalities, with seven seats assigned to Wantage Township.

Notable people

See also (related category): People from Wantage Township, New Jersey

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Wantage Township include:

  • Nick Boyle (born 1993), tight end for the Baltimore Ravens.
  • Nicholas D'Agostino (born 1989), motivational speaker, author, coach, radio host, nonprofit founder and entrepreneur who was diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy as a child.
  • Lou Dobbs (born 1945), radio and television host.
  • Scott Garrett (born 1959), former U.S. Representative for New Jersey's 5th congressional district, served from 2003 to 2017.
  • Hugh Judson Kilpatrick (1836–1881), Union Army officer during the American Civil War, achieving the rank of brevet major general.
  • Parker Space (born 1968), politician who has served in the New Jersey General Assembly since February 2013, where he represents the 24th Legislative District, who served as Mayor of Wantage Township in 2005 and 2008–09.
  • Harold J. Wirths (born c. 1965), politician appointed by Governor Chris Christie in 2010 to serve as the Commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development.
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