Arlington, Texas facts for kids

Kids Encyclopedia Facts
Arlington, Texas
City
City of Arlington
Images from top, left to right: AT&T Stadium, The University of Texas at Arlington, Globe Life Park in Arlington, Lake Arlington, Six Flags Over Texas
Flag of Arlington, Texas
Flag
Official logo of Arlington, Texas
Logo
Location of Arlington in Tarrant County, Texas
Location of Arlington in Tarrant County, Texas
Country  United States
State  Texas
County Flag of Tarrant County, Texas.png Tarrant
Government
 • Type Council-Manager
 • City Council Mayor Jeff Williams
Kathryn Wilemon
Jimmy Bennett
Sheri Capehart
Michael Glaspie
Robert Rivera
Robert Shephard
Lana Wolff
 • City Manager Trey Yelverton
Area
 • City 99.7 sq mi (258.2 km2)
 • Land 96.5 sq mi (249.9 km2)
 • Water 3.2 sq mi (8.3 km2)
Elevation 604 ft (184 m)
Population (2010)
 • City 365,438
 • Estimate (2014) 383,204
 • Rank (US: 50th)
 • Density 3,810/sq mi (1,472/km2)
 • Urban 5,121,892 (6th)(DFW Metroplex)
 • Metro 6,810,913 (4th)(DFW Metroplex)
 • CSA 7,206,144 (7th)(DFW Metroplex)
Demonym(s) Arlingtonite
Time zone CST (UTC−6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC−5)
ZIP codes 76000-76099 (76029 is exclusive to UT-Arlington)
Area code(s) 817, 214, 972
FIPS code 48-04000
GNIS feature ID 1372320
Website www.arlingtontx.gov

Arlington is a principal city in the U.S. state of Texas, located in Tarrant County. It is part of the Mid-Cities region of the Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington metropolitan area, approximately 12 miles (19 km) east of downtown Fort Worth and 20 miles (32 km) west of downtown Dallas.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau's estimate, the city had a population of almost 379,577 at the end of 2013, making it the third-largest municipality in the metropolitan area. Arlington is the fiftieth-most populous city in the United States, the seventh-most populous city in the state of Texas, and the largest city in the state that is not a county seat.

Arlington is home to The University of Texas at Arlington, a doctoral-granting research institution, the Arlington Assembly plant used by General Motors, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Region IV, Texas Health Resources, and American Mensa. Additionally, Arlington hosts the Texas Rangers' Globe Life Park in Arlington, and the Dallas Cowboys at the AT&T Stadium, the International Bowling Campus (which houses the United States Bowling Congress, International Bowling Museum and the International Bowling Hall of Fame), and the theme parks Six Flags Over Texas (the original Six Flags) and Hurricane Harbor.

Arlington borders Kennedale, Grand Prairie, Mansfield and Fort Worth, and surrounds the smaller communities of Dalworthington Gardens and Pantego.

History

See also: Timeline of Arlington, Texas

European settlement in the Arlington area dates back at least to the 1840s. After the May 24, 1841 battle between Texas General Edward H. Tarrant (Tarrant County is named after him) and Native Americans of the Village Creek settlement, a trading post was established at Marrow Bone Spring in present-day Arlington (historical marker at ). The rich soil of the area attracted farmers, and several agriculture-related businesses were well established by the late nineteenth century.

Cowboys stadium
AT&T Stadium – May 2009

Arlington was founded in 1876 along the Texas and Pacific Railway. The city was named after General Robert E. Lee's Arlington House in Arlington County, Virginia. Arlington grew as a cotton-ginning and farming center, and incorporated in 1884. The city could boast of water, electricity, natural gas, and telephone services by 1910, along with a public school system. By 1925 the population was estimated at 3,031, and it grew to over 4,000 before World War II.

Large-scale industrialization began in 1954 with the arrival of a General Motors assembly plant. Automotive and aerospace development gave the city one of the nation's greatest population growth rates between 1950 and 1990. Arlington became one of the "boomburbs", the extremely fast-growing suburbs of the post-World War II era. U.S. Census Bureau population figures for the city tell the story: 7,692 (1950), 90,229 (1970), 261,721 (1990), 365,438 (2010) and almost 374,000 by 2011. Tom Vandergriff served as mayor from 1951 to 1977 during this period of explosive development. Six Flags Over Texas opened in Arlington in 1961. In 1972 the Washington Senators baseball team relocated to Arlington and began play as the Texas Rangers and in 2009 the Dallas Cowboys also began to play at the newly constructed Cowboys Stadium, now AT&T Stadium.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, Arlington has a total area of 99.0 square miles (256 km2): 95.8 square miles (248 km2) of it was land, and 3.2 square miles (8.3 km2) of it (3.24%) is water.

Johnson Creek, a tributary of the Trinity River, and the Trinity River itself, flow through Arlington.

Surrounding municipalities

Climate

Arlington falls in the Cfa (humid subtropical) region of the Köppen climate classification system which is a climate zone characterized by hot, humid summers and mild to cool winters.

  • The highest recorded temperature was 113 °F (45 °C) in 1980.
  • The lowest recorded temperature was −8 °F (−22 °C) in 1899.
  • The maximum average precipitation occurs in May.
  • Severe weather generally occurs April and May months.
  • Located in the famous Tornado Alley
  • Winters are typically dry and mild with snow seldom occurring (snowless years are not unusual)
Climate data for Arlington, Texas
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 93
(33.9)
96
(35.6)
100
(37.8)
101
(38.3)
107
(41.7)
113
(45)
110
(43.3)
112
(44.4)
111
(43.9)
106
(41.1)
89
(31.7)
90
(32.2)
113
(45)
Average high °F (°C) 54.7
(12.61)
59.1
(15.06)
66.1
(18.94)
73.9
(23.28)
81.6
(27.56)
89.2
(31.78)
94.1
(34.5)
94.4
(34.67)
86.6
(30.33)
76.5
(24.72)
65.0
(18.33)
56.3
(13.5)
74.79
(23.773)
Daily mean °F (°C) 44.9
(7.17)
48.7
(9.28)
56.1
(13.39)
64.4
(18)
73.6
(23.11)
80.9
(27.17)
85.1
(29.5)
85.4
(29.67)
77.2
(25.11)
66.1
(18.94)
55.4
(13)
46.4
(8)
65.35
(18.528)
Average low °F (°C) 35.1
(1.72)
38.3
(3.5)
46.2
(7.89)
54.8
(12.67)
65.6
(18.67)
72.6
(22.56)
76.1
(24.5)
76.3
(24.61)
67.8
(19.89)
55.6
(13.11)
45.7
(7.61)
36.4
(2.44)
55.88
(13.264)
Record low °F (°C) −2
(-18.9)
−8
(-22.2)
10
(-12.2)
29
(-1.7)
34
(1.1)
48
(8.9)
56
(13.3)
55
(12.8)
40
(4.4)
24
(-4.4)
19
(-7.2)
−1
(-18.3)
-8
(-17.8)
Precipitation inches (mm) 2.41
(61.2)
2.91
(73.9)
3.54
(89.9)
3.01
(76.5)
5.41
(137.4)
4.32
(109.7)
2.66
(67.6)
2.23
(56.6)
3.17
(80.5)
4.49
(114)
2.66
(67.6)
2.79
(70.9)
39.6
(1,005.8)
Snowfall inches (cm) 0.3
(0.8)
0.4
(1)
0.1
(0.3)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.2
(0.5)
1.0
(2.5)
Source: NWS Dallas/Fort Worth

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1880 163
1890 664 307.4%
1900 1,079 62.5%
1910 1,794 66.3%
1920 3,031 69.0%
1930 3,661 20.8%
1940 4,240 15.8%
1950 7,692 81.4%
1960 44,775 482.1%
1970 90,643 102.4%
1980 160,113 76.6%
1990 261,721 63.5%
2000 332,969 27.2%
2010 365,438 9.8%
Est. 2015 388,125 16.6%
U.S. Decennial Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 365,438 people, 133,072 households, and 90,099 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,811 people per square mile (1,472/km²). There were 144,805 housing units at an average density of 1,510 per square mile (5,833/km²). The 2011 estimated racial makeup of the city (based on the 2010 census) was 59% White, 18.8% Black or African American, 6.8% Asian, 0.7% Native American, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 11.3% from other races, and 3.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 27.4% of the population.

There were 133,072 households out of which 40% had children under the age of 18 living in them, 48% were married couples living together, 15% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32% were non-families. 25% of all households were made up of individuals and 5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.7 and the average family size was 3.3.

In the city, the 2010 population was spread out with 31% under the age of 20, 8% from 20 to 24, 30% from 25 to 44, 23% from 45 to 64, and 8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 104 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94 males 18 and over.

The median income for a household in the city was estimated to be $50,655 in 2011. Individual males working full-time year-round had a median income of $41,059 versus $35,265 for females. The per capita income for the city was $25,317.

About 16% of Arlington families in general and 31% of female-headed families with no husband present were living below the poverty line. 20% of the Arlington population as a whole, including 28% of individuals under age 18 and 8% of those age 65 or over were living in poverty.

43% of Arlington renters and 28% of homeowners were paying 35% or more of their household income for housing costs in 2011.

Arlington is among the top 50 largest cities in the United States by population.

Arts and entertainment

SixFlagsTower-5865
Oil derrick tower at
Six Flags Over Texas

Arlington is home to Six Flags Over Texas, a nationwide theme park that includes many notable attractions. Six Flags also opened Six Flags Hurricane Harbor, a waterpark, after the previous location, Wet 'n Wild, was sold to them in the mid-1990s.

With the relocation of the U.S. Bowling Congress, and the Bowling Proprietors Association of America and the International Bowling Museum and Hall of Fame, Arlington became the world headquarters for bowling. The International Bowling Museum and International Bowling Hall of Fame are located on the International Bowling Campus in Arlington.

For retail shopping, Arlington is home to The Parks Mall at Arlington, which houses numerous retail outlets, eateries, an ice skating rink, and a movie theatre. In addition, The Arlington Highlands was completed in mid-2007, serving as an entertainment hotspot with places such as Studio Movie Grill, Piranha Killer Sushi, BJ's Brewhouse, The Improv Theatre, Bar Louies, Plucker's, World Market, Chuy's Tex-Mex and Dave and Busters, among others. The Arlington Highlands is located on I-20 at Matlock Rd. The Lincoln Square located near the AT&T Stadium houses several retail outlets and restaurants.

Arlington is also home to Theatre Arlington, one of the largest community theatres in the nation which produces quality live theatre year round and offers theater classes for all ages. The Mainstage Theatre at UT-Arlington is another well-known venue for live theatre in Arlington.

The Arlington Museum of Art in downtown and The Gallery at UT Arlington are the city's designated art venues. The Art Museum is currently host to a public art project called "The Star of Texas" to promote Arlington's newest slogan of being the "American Dream City". Twenty community artists were chosen to paint a large star sculpture with a unique interpretation of what it means to live the American dream in Arlington. From 2016 until 2019, these stars are available to discover all over Arlington. From the TCC campuses, to the Arlington Highlands shopping center, to all over downtown and other various locations, every star will lead visitors to a significant location in the city. In 2014, a community mural was created along the wall of Park Plaza Shopping Center, an east Arlington location that was the target of graffiti tagging for a long time.

The Planetarium Dome Theater at UT Arlington is one of the largest and most sophisticated in Texas.

Levitt Pavilion Arlington opened in 2009 and offers 50 free concerts per year in downtown Arlington featuring acclaimed artists and a diverse range of music genres. Notable performers have included Pentatonix, The Polyphonic Spree, The Quebe Sisters, The Band of Heathens, The Killdares, Ray Wylie Hubbard, and GRAMMY-winning Asleep at the Wheel. The Arlington Music Hall is a historic 1,056 seat venue that is a popular destination for live concerts. The Texas Hall is a 2,635 seat venue at UT-Arlington that is another popular destination for live concerts.

On July 4, the Arlington 4th Of July Parade Association puts on the annual parade through Downtown, Arlington featuring floats and entries from local school, businesses, and organizations. The parade is broadcast on local stations as well as on via AISD TV.

Arlington Convention & Visitors Bureau

The Arlington Convention & Visitors Bureau is the official tourism identity for the city of Arlington, Texas. The Arlington Convention & Visitors Bureau (ACVB) is tasked with pursuing conventions, meetings, tour groups, reunions and individual leisure travelers to increase city revenues from sale and lodging taxes. The Arlington CVB also supports local stakeholders that pursue high-profile special events and sporting events to fill hotels, Arlington Convention Center, AT&T Stadium, College Park Center, Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, and other venues around the city. The Arlington CVB offers complimentary services and lodging discounts to large groups and individual travelers.

Visitors Information Center

The Arlington Visitors Welcome Center is located next to Rangers Ballpark in Arlington and adjacent to AT&T Stadium. Visitors can pick up discounts, Arlington Visitors Guide, maps and more.

Transportation

On July 2, 1902 the first Dallas/Fort-Worth "Interurban" electric trolley came to Arlington; this popular service ran between those three cities and points in between until Christmas Eve, 1934, providing easy transportation for both business and pleasure. The track ran through Arlington along what is now Abram Street.

RonaldReaganMemorialHwy ArlingtonTX
On February 16, 2006, I-20 in Arlington was dedicated as Ronald Reagan Memorial Highway (signs are visible at mile markers 447 and 452).

Arlington Municipal Airport (GKY) is located entirely within Arlington and is a public use airport owned by the City of Arlington. It serves as a reliever airport for Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport and Dallas Love Field (though it lacks scheduled airline service) and is currently used for general aviation purposes. Several companies operate aircraft services on the airport property, including the Bell Helicopter division of Textron.

For many years, Arlington had the somewhat notorious distinction of being the largest city in the United States that was not served by a public transportation system. Between 1980 and 2013, voters rejected three separate ballot proposals to bring public transportation to the city, though certain political and economic realities particular to North Texas made successful passage of those measures arguably more difficult in Arlington than in other parts of the state or country. On August 19, 2013, following unanimous approval by the Arlington city council, the Metro Arlington Express (MAX) bus route began a two-year pilot program providing a two-stop weekday bus route between College Park Center (on the campus of The University of Texas at Arlington) and the Trinity Railway Express (TRE) CentrePort Station near DFW Airport; from this station riders may take the TRE to Fort Worth, Dallas and points in between, all of which are served by comprehensive public transit systems. The MAX program was funded primarily by the City of Arlington and The University of Texas at Arlington, with cooperation and contributions from other regional transportation entities and municipalities, along with contributions from local businesses. In July 2015, the Arlington city council voted to extend the MAX program for an additional year. Under existing state finance laws, the voters of Arlington would have to approve any permanent funding for the MAX program.

Arlington does have four transit services targeting individual demographic groups: "Handitran" serves senior citizens and the disabled; Arlington hotels pay for a tourist-oriented shuttle-bus system for their guests; The University of Texas at Arlington runs a limited shuttle service for college students; and lastly Mission Arlington, an Arlington-run charity serving the severely indigent, has a bus service that circulates people needing social services or transportation to employment.

The city is served by two Interstate Highways, I-20, also known as Ronald Reagan Memorial Highway, and I-30, also named Tom Landry Memorial Highway. Other limited-access freeways include State Highway 360, which is named for the founder of Six Flags Over Texas, Angus G. Wynne, running along the eastern border, and U.S. Highway 287, which traverses the southwestern portion of the city. In most cases, the memorial names are not used in reference to these roadways.

The Union Pacific Railroad now owns and operates the original Texas and Pacific (later Missouri Pacific) transcontinental right-of-way and rail route though Arlington (parallel to which the Interurban originally ran); it offers no passenger stops in Arlington, its Arlington freight service is primarily to the local General Motors assembly plant, and most of its lengthy and numerous freight trains are merely passing through town to and from points far away.

Sister cities

Arlington and Bad Königshofen, Germany have been sister cities since 1952. Arlington operates the Bad Königshofen outdoor family aquatic center, named after its sister city. In return, Bad Königshofen has a recreational park named after Arlington. The relationship between the two cities dates to 1951, when the German town manager, Kurt Zuhlke, visited Arlington as part of a study tour in the U.S.

Images for kids


Arlington, Texas Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.