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Cassia County, Idaho facts for kids

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Cassia County, Idaho
Seal of Cassia County, Idaho
Map
Map of Idaho highlighting Cassia County
Location in the state of Idaho
Map of the USA highlighting Idaho
Idaho's location in the U.S.
Statistics
Founded February 20, 1879
Seat Burley
Largest City Burley
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

2,580 sq mi (6,682 km²)
2,565 sq mi (6,643 km²)
15 sq mi (39 km²), 0.6%
Population
 - (2010)
 - Density

22,952
8.9/sq mi (3/km²)
Time zone Mountain: UTC-7/-6
Website: www.cassiacounty.org
Named for: Cassia Creek

Cassia County is a county located in the U.S. state of Idaho. As of the 2010 Census the county had a population of 22,952. The county seat and largest city is Burley.

Cassia County is included in the Burley, ID Micropolitan Statistical Area.

History

The first Europeans explored the Milner area in Cassia County in 1911. It was trappers who initially developed the Oregon Trail, which ran on the county's northern border. The Raft River's junction with the Oregon Trail marked the split for the California Trail. While the Oregon and California trails brought hundreds of thousands of emigrants through Cassia County, it also brought settlers. A Stage line through the county was established between Kelton, Utah and Boise, Idaho in 1869. A stage station existed at City of Rocks. Additional stations were spaced at increments of 10-12 miles between stations to include one at Oakley Meadows, located in the Goose Creek valley two miles west of the present settlement of Oakley. William Oakley settled at the Oakley Meadows station in 1870. Cattle operations also developed starting in 1872. Settlement commenced at nearby Albion in 1873 with significant Mormon settlement there starting in 1875. By 1880, Albion contained a population of 257. Mormon settlement at Oakley also commenced June 1, 1878 when four Mormon men each staked out 160 acres for their settlement. Settlements remained primarily agricultural with more than 38,000 head of cattle located in the area by 1885. Settlement at Malta occurred prior to 1890, as the Malta precinct was enumerated with 172 residents at the 1890 census. Albion State Normal School was established at Albion in 1893. The school was focused on training Idaho teachers until 1951 when its programs were transferred to Idaho State College (now Idaho State University) in Pocatello.

Burley was platted and settled in 1905 after a branch of the Oregon Shortline was constructed through the town. Declo was settled under the name of Marshfield by 1909.

Cassia County was created from [[Owyhee County, Idaho|Owyhee County on February 20, 1879 with Albion becoming the county seat. A western portion became Twin Falls County in 1907. The county assumed its present boundaries when an eastern portion became Power County on January 30, 1913. The county seat was moved to Burley in 1918. The county was named for Cassia Creek, which in turn was named either for John Cazier, a member of the Mormon Battalion and an emigrant train captain, or for a plant found in the area.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 2,580 square miles (6,700 km2), of which 2,565 square miles (6,640 km2) is land and 15 square miles (39 km2) (0.6%) is water. The county's highest point is Cache Peak at an elevation of 10,339 feet (3,151 m) above sea level in the Albion Mountains, and the lowest is Milner Lake, a reservoir on the Snake River, at 4,134 feet (1,260 m).

The northern half of the county is part of the Magic Valley region of the Snake River Plain, and numerous mountain ranges extend north from the southern boundary and diminish as they approach the river, which flows from east to west.

The Silent City of Rocks National Reserve, containing exposed granitic batholith as old as 2.5 billion years, is located in the southern part of the county.

Adjacent Counties

Highways

  • I-84.svg Interstate 84
  • I-86.svg Interstate 86
  • US 30.svg US 30
  • ID-27.svg SH-27
  • ID-77.svg SH-77
  • ID-81.svg SH-81

National protected areas

  • City of Rocks National Reserve
  • Minidoka National Wildlife Refuge (part)
  • Sawtooth National Forest (part)

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 1,312
1890 3,143 139.6%
1900 3,951 25.7%
1910 7,197 82.2%
1920 15,659 117.6%
1930 13,116 −16.2%
1940 14,430 10.0%
1950 14,629 1.4%
1960 16,121 10.2%
1970 17,017 5.6%
1980 19,427 14.2%
1990 19,532 0.5%
2000 21,416 9.6%
2010 22,952 7.2%
Est. 2015 23,506 2.4%
U.S. Decennial Census
1790-1960 1900-1990
1990-2000 2010-2014

2000 census

As of the census of 2000, there were 21,416 people, 7,060 households, and 5,485 families residing in the county. The population density was 8 people per square mile (3/km²). There were 7,862 housing units at an average density of 3 per square mile (1/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 84.69% White, 0.17% Black or African American, 0.80% Native American, 0.37% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 12.06% from other races, and 1.87% from two or more races. 18.74% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 23.1% were of English, 13.8% American and 12.9% German ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 7,060 households out of which 42.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.20% were married couples living together, 8.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.30% were non-families. 19.50% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.99 and the average family size was 3.46.

In the county, the population was spread out with 34.10% under the age of 18, 9.00% from 18 to 24, 24.50% from 25 to 44, 19.60% from 45 to 64, and 12.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 101.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $33,322, and the median income for a family was $38,162. Males had a median income of $29,132 versus $19,851 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,087. About 11.10% of families and 13.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.60% of those under age 18 and 8.00% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 22,952 people, 7,666 households, and 5,758 families residing in the county. The population density was 8.9 inhabitants per square mile (3.4/km2). There were 8,372 housing units at an average density of 3.3 per square mile (1.3/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 81.8% white, 0.8% American Indian, 0.5% Asian, 0.3% black or African American, 0.1% Pacific islander, 14.2% from other races, and 2.3% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 24.9% of the population. In terms of ancestry, 22.3% were English, 11.8% were German, 10.6% were American, and 5.1% were Irish.

Of the 7,666 households, 41.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.8% were married couples living together, 9.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 24.9% were non-families, and 21.5% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.96 and the average family size was 3.46. The median age was 32.0 years.

The median income for a household in the county was $39,866 and the median income for a family was $47,995. Males had a median income of $36,402 versus $22,156 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,782. About 12.4% of families and 15.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.7% of those under age 18 and 8.1% of those age 65 or over.

Communities

Cities

Unincorporated communities

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