Hillsborough Township, New Jersey facts for kids

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Hillsborough Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Hillsborough
Township municipal complex
Township municipal complex
Map highlighting Hillsborough Township's location within Somerset County. Inset: Location of Somerset County in New Jersey.
Map highlighting Hillsborough Township's location within Somerset County. Inset: Location of Somerset County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Hillsborough Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Hillsborough Township, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Somerset
Royal charter September 12, 1771
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Area
 • Total 55.001 sq mi (142.453 km2)
 • Land 54.536 sq mi (141.248 km2)
 • Water 0.465 sq mi (1.204 km2)  0.85%
Area rank 29th of 566 in state
1st of 21 in county
Elevation 108 ft (33 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 38,303
 • Estimate (2015) 39,821
 • Rank 59th of 566 in state
3rd of 21 in county
 • Density 702.3/sq mi (271.2/km2)
 • Density rank 413th of 566 in state
15th of 21 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08844
Area code(s) 732 and 908
FIPS code 3403531890
GNIS feature ID 0882169
Website hillsborough-nj.org

Hillsborough Township is a township in Somerset County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 38,303, reflecting an increase of 1,669 (+4.6%) from the 36,634 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 7,826 (+27.2%) from the 28,808 counted in the 1990 Census.

Hillsborough Township was originally created by Royal charter on September 12, 1771, from portions of Western precinct. It was incorporated by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798, as one of New Jersey's original group of 104 townships. Portions of the township were taken to form the boroughs of Millstone (May 14, 1894) and Manville (April 1, 1929). The township's name may have come from an earlier name of "Hillsbury", though it may have been named for Wills Hill, 1st Marquess of Downshire who was the Earl of Hillsborough.

History

On May 31, 1771, Hillsborough was officially granted a Charter incorporating it as a Township. A revised charter was issued on September 12, 1771. The records of Hillsborough Township are complete from their inception in 1746 and there are ten volumes, each some several hundred pages, kept in the Special Collections Department of the Rutgers University Library along with the Charter.

Hillsborough Township quickly took its place in history as the path General George Washington and his troops traveled from the Battle of Princeton to winter quarters in Morristown. While the British were encamped in the valley below awaiting an opportunity to attack, it is said that Washington drilled his troops on the Sourland Mountain around a spring near the top using different formations and corn stalks for guns. As the sun caught the stalks, the British thought Washington had received reinforcements and fresh supplies. The British troops, thinking that they were outnumbered, slipped off to New Brunswick leaving Washington to continue to Morristown.

The township was formally incorporated on February 21, 1798.

Hillsborough is the home of the Belle Mead GSA depot, or Belle Mead General Depot, which was a storage site for materials during World War II, along with housing Italian and German prisoners of war. It continued storing materials until the 1980s, and various contaminants have leaked into the ground and surrounding area during that time. Efforts are under way to convert the site into a mixed recreation and R&D complex.

Hillsborough is home to Duke Gardens and Duke Farms, a 2,700 acres (11 km2) estate in the north-eastern quadrant of the town that was originally owned by tobacco and electric energy tycoon James "Buck" Duke and then passed down to daughter Doris Duke, and is now one of the few remaining "preserved" natural areas in Hillsborough Township.

In Money magazine's 2013 Best Places to Live rankings, Hillsborough was ranked 16th in the nation, the third-highest among the three places in New Jersey included in the top 50 list. In the magazine's 2007 rankings, the township was ranked as the 23rd best place to live in the nation.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 55.001 square miles (142.453 km2), including 54.536 square miles (141.248 km2) of land and 0.465 square miles (1.204 km2) of water (0.85%).

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Amwell,

The township borders Branchburg Township, Bridgewater Township, Franklin Township, Manville, Millstone, Montgomery Township, Raritan and Somerville in Somerset County; and East Amwell Township, Raritan Township and Readington Township in Hunterdon County.

Climate

Climate data for Hillsborough Township, New Jersey
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 74
(23.3)
76
(24.4)
86
(30)
94
(34.4)
99
(37.2)
101
(38.3)
104
(40)
105
(40.6)
105
(40.6)
92
(33.3)
84
(28.9)
73
(22.8)
105
(40.6)
Average high °F (°C) 38
(3.3)
41
(5)
50
(10)
61
(16.1)
72
(22.2)
80
(26.7)
85
(29.4)
83
(28.3)
76
(24.4)
64
(17.8)
54
(12.2)
42
(5.6)
62.2
(16.76)
Average low °F (°C) 18
(-7.8)
20
(-6.7)
27
(-2.8)
36
(2.2)
46
(7.8)
56
(13.3)
61
(16.1)
60
(15.6)
52
(11.1)
40
(4.4)
31
(-0.6)
23
(-5)
39.2
(3.98)
Record low °F (°C) −16
(-26.7)
−12
(-24.4)
−1
(-18.3)
16
(-8.9)
26
(-3.3)
34
(1.1)
44
(6.7)
38
(3.3)
29
(-1.7)
12
(-11.1)
5
(-15)
−10
(-23.3)
−16
(-26.7)
Precipitation inches (mm) 3.59
(91.2)
2.84
(72.1)
3.94
(100.1)
4.09
(103.9)
4.33
(110)
4.35
(110.5)
4.83
(122.7)
3.98
(101.1)
4.26
(108.2)
4.21
(106.9)
3.59
(91.2)
3.84
(97.5)
47.85
(1,215.4)

Redevelopment

After the three and three quarter mile U.S. Route 206 Bypass is completed, the town plans to design a town center along the old Business Route 206. Construction for the bypass began in 2010 and is expected to be completed by 2017, with the old section of US-206 intended to become "main street" for the township and be zoned for commercial and residential use.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1790 2,201
1810 2,456
1820 2,885 17.5%
1830 2,878 −0.2%
1840 2,863 −0.5%
1850 3,409 19.1%
1860 3,488 2.3%
1870 3,443 −1.3%
1880 3,248 −5.7%
1890 2,825 −13.0%
1900 2,439 * −13.7%
1910 2,313 −5.2%
1920 5,124 121.5%
1930 2,283 * −55.4%
1940 2,645 15.9%
1950 3,875 46.5%
1960 7,584 95.7%
1970 11,061 45.8%
1980 19,061 72.3%
1990 28,808 51.1%
2000 36,634 27.2%
2010 38,303 4.6%
Est. 2015 39,821 4.0%
Population sources:
1790-1920 1840 1850-1870
1850 1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010
* = Lost territory in previous decade.

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 38,303 people, 13,573 households, and 10,424 families residing in the township. The population density was 702.3 per square mile (271.2/km2). There were 14,030 housing units at an average density of 257.3 per square mile (99.3/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 78.61% (30,109) White, 4.59% (1,757) Black or African American, 0.12% (46) Native American, 12.38% (4,743) Asian, 0.04% (15) Pacific Islander, 2.18% (834) from other races, and 2.09% (799) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.55% (2,893) of the population.

There were 13,573 households out of which 40.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.7% were married couples living together, 8.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.2% were non-families. 19.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.81 and the average family size was 3.25.

In the township, the population was spread out with 26.4% under the age of 18, 6.5% from 18 to 24, 25.6% from 25 to 44, 32.2% from 45 to 64, and 9.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39.9 years. For every 100 females there were 95.0 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 91.4 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $105,429 (with a margin of error of +/- $2,892) and the median family income was $119,750 (+/- $2,852). Males had a median income of $81,807 (+/- $5,320) versus $52,366 (+/- $1,804) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $43,029 (+/- $1,701). About 0.8% of families and 1.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.1% of those under age 18 and 4.0% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 36,634 people, 12,649 households, and 9,802 families residing in the township. The population density was 669.9 people per square mile (258.6/km²). There were 12,854 housing units at an average density of 235.0 per square mile (90.7/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 85.96% White, 7.31% Asian, 3.76% African American, 0.09% American Indian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 1.28% from other races, and 1.53% from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 4.75% of the population.

There were 12,649 households out of which 44.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them . said– 67.6% were married couples living together, 7.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.5% were non-families. 17.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 4.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.88, and the average family size was 3.31.

In the township, the population was spread out with 29.1% under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 34.7% from 25 to 44, 23.3% from 45 to 64, and 6.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.1 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $83,290, and the median income for a family was $93,933. Males had a median income of $62,273 versus $42,052 for females. The per capita income for the township was $33,091. About 2.1% of families and 3.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.6% of those under age 18 and 3.5% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 211.92 miles (341.05 km) of roadways, of which 185.42 miles (298.40 km) were maintained by the municipality, 19.79 miles (31.85 km) by Somerset County and 6.71 miles (10.80 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

U.S. Route 206 is the main road that passes through the township. A new alignment of US 206, the 1.66-mile (2.67 km) US 206 Bypass, was completed through Hillsborough in 2015 to bypass the congested stretch of the road. The road is named for Peter J. Biondi, a former Hillsborough mayor and member of the General Assembly.

Main county roads that pass through are CR 514 which runs for 10.24 miles (16.48 km) through the township, and CR 533. Interstate 287 is outside the municipality in bordering Bridgewater and Franklin Townships. Part of the proposed routing of Interstate 95 through central New Jersey included Hillsborough; this project was ultimately canceled in the 1980s.

Rail

NJ Transit has proposed a new West Trenton Line that would stretch for 27 miles (43 km) from the West Trenton station in Ewing Township to a connection with the Raritan Valley Line at Bridgewater Township, and from there to Newark Penn Station in Newark. The plan would include stations at both Belle Mead and Hillsborough.

The Norfolk Southern Railway's Lehigh Line (formerly the mainline of the Lehigh Valley Railroad), runs through Hillsborough Township.


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