Upper Township, New Jersey facts for kids

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Upper Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Upper
Tuckahoe Station
Tuckahoe Station
Upper Township highlighted in Cape May County. Inset map: Cape May County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Upper Township highlighted in Cape May County. Inset map: Cape May County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Upper Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Upper Township, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Cape May
Formed April 2, 1723
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Area
 • Total 68.687 sq mi (177.900 km2)
 • Land 62.149 sq mi (160.966 km2)
 • Water 6.538 sq mi (16.934 km2)  9.52%
Area rank 17th of 566 in state
2nd of 16 in county
Elevation 30 ft (9 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 12,373
 • Estimate (2015) 12,014
 • Rank 197th of 566 in state
3rd of 16 in county
 • Density 199.1/sq mi (76.9/km2)
 • Density rank 506th of 566 in state
15th of 16 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 08270 - Woodbine
08230 - Ocean View
08223 - Marmora
08248 - Strathmere
Area code(s) 609
FIPS code 3400974810
GNIS feature ID 0882047
Website www.uppertownship.com

Upper Township is a large township in Cape May County, New Jersey, United States. It is part of the Ocean City Metropolitan Statistical Area. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 12,373, reflecting an increase of 258 (+2.1%) from the 12,115 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,434 (+13.4%) from the 10,681 counted in the 1990 Census.

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Upper Township as its 2nd best place to live in its 2008 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.

During 2008, Upper Township was considering consolidation with neighboring Corbin City. Corbin City already shares extensively with Upper Township for municipal service, but the question of consolidating municipalities across county borders presented an obstacle to a full merger.

Upper Township is home to the only yellow fire trucks in Cape May County, a tradition started in 1985 when the Seaville Fire Rescue Company was purchasing a new vehicle and thought that federal regulations would require the color. Since being formed in 1964 and purchasing its first fire truck a year later, the Seaville company has served the area, responding to over 200 calls a year from its fire station is located on Route 50 across from Dino's Seaville Diner.

History

Upper Township was formed as a precinct on April 2, 1723, and was incorporated as one of New Jersey's initial 104 townships by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798. Portions of the township have been taken to form Dennis Township (March 1, 1827) and Ocean City borough (March 3, 1884), and territorial changes were made involving Sea Isle City in March and April 1905. The township's name came from its location when Cape May was split into three townships in 1723 at the same time that Lower Township and Middle Township were created.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 68.687 square miles (177.900 km2), including 62.149 square miles (160.966 km2) of land and 6.538 square miles (16.934 km2) of water (9.52%).

Strathmere (2010 population of 158) is a unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) located within Upper Township. Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Beesley's Point, Blackmans Island, Cedar Springs, Corsons Inlet, Formosa, Greenfield, Marmora, Marshallville, Middletown, Miramar, Palermo, Petersburg, Seaville, Steelmantown, Tuckahoe, West Ocean City and Whale Beach. The township contains many different communities and enclaves that create a diverse area reaching from Great Egg Harbor to the Atlantic Ocean. Seaville is the largest community and Strathmere is the township's island containing a beach community.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 1,664
1820 2,107 26.6%
1830 1,067 * −49.4%
1840 1,217 14.1%
1850 1,341 10.2%
1860 1,552 15.7%
1870 1,483 −4.4%
1880 1,702 14.8%
1890 1,381 * −18.9%
1900 1,351 −2.2%
1910 1,483 9.8%
1920 1,272 −14.2%
1930 1,657 30.3%
1940 1,675 1.1%
1950 1,922 14.7%
1960 2,539 32.1%
1970 3,413 34.4%
1980 6,713 96.7%
1990 10,681 59.1%
2000 12,115 13.4%
2010 12,373 2.1%
Est. 2015 12,014 −2.9%
Population sources:1810-2000
1810-1920 1840 1850-1870
1850 1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010
* = Lost territory in previous decade.

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 12,373 people, 4,566 households, and 3,461 families residing in the township. The population density was 199.1 per square mile (76.9/km2). There were 6,341 housing units at an average density of 102.0 per square mile (39.4/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 96.61% (11,954) White, 0.58% (72) Black or African American, 0.13% (16) Native American, 0.74% (92) Asian, 0.01% (1) Pacific Islander, 0.72% (89) from other races, and 1.20% (149) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.36% (292) of the population.

There were 4,566 households out of which 32.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.2% were married couples living together, 9.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.2% were non-families. 20.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.14.

In the township, the population was spread out with 23.8% under the age of 18, 7.7% from 18 to 24, 20.2% from 25 to 44, 34.0% from 45 to 64, and 14.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.6 years. For every 100 females there were 94.4 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 92.1 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $81,250 (with a margin of error of +/- $8,629) and the median family income was $97,372 (+/- $6,832). Males had a median income of $63,597 (+/- $2,442) versus $46,250 (+/- $4,552) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $38,702 (+/- $2,243). About 2.5% of families and 4.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.9% of those under age 18 and 6.6% of those age 65 or over.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 12,115 people, 4,266 households, and 3,365 families residing in the township. The population density was 191.8 people per square mile (74.1/km²). There were 5,472 housing units at an average density of 86.6 per square mile (33.5/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 97.59% White, 0.69% African American, 0.12% Native American, 0.61% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.19% from other races, and 0.74% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.28% of the population.

There were 4,266 households out of which 39.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.7% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.1% were non-families. 17.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.84 and the average family size was 3.23.

In the township the population was spread out with 28.6% under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 27.7% from 25 to 44, 25.5% from 45 to 64, and 12.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 93.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.4 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $60,942, and the median income for a family was $68,824. Males had a median income of $46,528 versus $31,325 for females. The per capita income for the township was $27,498. About 2.4% of families and 3.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.1% of those under age 18 and 3.8% of those age 65 or over.

Parks and recreation

With its beaches in the Strathmere section, Upper Township is one of five municipalities in the state that offer free public access to oceanfront beaches monitored by lifeguards, joining Atlantic City, North Wildwood, Wildwood and Wildwood Crest.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 140.23 miles (225.68 km) of roadways, of which 74.84 miles (120.44 km) were maintained by the municipality, 36.95 miles (59.47 km) by Cape May County and 19.37 miles (31.17 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 9.07 miles (14.60 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.

The Garden State Parkway passes through and has two exits that provide access to Route 50 and U.S. Route 9 (since the Beesley's Point Bridge is closed). The Parkway connects Dennis Township on the south to Egg Harbor Township in the north. at Interchange 20 for Seaville / Tuckahoe and Interchange 25 for Ocean City / Marmora via County Route 623.

Other major roads that pass through include Route 49, CR 548 and CR 557.

Public transportation

NJ Transit offers the 313 and 315 (and the 316 offering seasonal service) inter-city bus routes that runs through the town three times a day and shuttle people between Cape May and Philadelphia, the 319 route to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan, and the 551 route between Philadelphia and Atlantic City.

Points of interest

  • Tuckahoe Station
  • Marshallville Historic District
  • Thomas Beesley Sr. House
  • John Wesley Gandy House

Upper Township, New Jersey Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.