Millburn, New Jersey facts for kids

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Millburn, New Jersey
Township
Township of Millburn
South Mountain Reservation in Millburn
South Mountain Reservation in Millburn
Official seal of Millburn, New Jersey
Seal
Location in Essex County and the state of New Jersey.
Location in Essex County and the state of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Millburn, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Millburn, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Essex
Incorporated March 20, 1857
Area
 • Total 9.876 sq mi (25.579 km2)
 • Land 9.322 sq mi (24.145 km2)
 • Water 0.554 sq mi (1.434 km2)  5.61%
Area rank 211th of 566 in state
5th of 22 in county
Elevation 394 ft (120 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 20,149
 • Estimate (2015) 20,363
 • Rank 129th of 566 in state
12th of 22 in county
 • Density 2,161.3/sq mi (834.5/km2)
 • Density rank 280th of 566 in state
16th of 22 in county
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 07041 - Millburn
07078 - Short Hills
Area code(s) 973
FIPS code 3401346380
GNIS feature ID 0882221
Website www.twp.millburn.nj.us

Millburn is a suburban township in Essex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 20,149, reflecting an increase of 384 (+1.9%) from the 19,765 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,135 (+6.1%) from the 18,630 counted in the 1990 Census.

Millburn was created as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 20, 1857, from portions of Springfield Township, when Union County was formed. Earlier known variously as Milltown, Millville, Rum Brook and Vauxhall, the name "Millburn" was adopted before the township was established. The township's name derives from the burn (Scottish for a stream) that powered mills in the area.

The township is home to the South Mountain Reservation, The Mall at Short Hills and the Paper Mill Playhouse, an established regional theater.

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Millburn as the 53rd best place to live in New Jersey in its 2008 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.

Millburn had the highest annual property tax bills in New Jersey in 2009 at $19,097, compared to the statewide average of $7,300 that year, which was the highest in the United States. This is primarily a function of high property values, as Millburn had the lowest effective property tax rate in 2014 (1.9%) among the 22 municipalities in Essex County.

History

In June 2007, Millburn celebrated its 150th birthday in its downtown, in one of the biggest celebrations in Millburn history.

Geography

Downtown Millburn

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 9.876 square miles (25.579 km2), including 9.322 square miles (24.145 km2) of land and 0.554 square mile (1.434 km2) of water (5.61%).

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Brantwood, Canoe Brook, Short Hills, Washington Rock, White Oak Ridge and Wyoming. Millburn comprises the historic Wyoming district and the South Mountain and Millburn Center areas. Short Hills contains the sections of Knollwood, Glenwood, Brookhaven, Country Club, Merrywood, Deerfield-Crossroads, Mountaintop, White Oak Ridge, and Old Short Hills Estates.

Situated approximately 15 miles (24 km) from Manhattan, Millburn Township is bordered by the Essex County communities of Livingston and West Orange to the north and northeast, and Maplewood to the east; the Morris County communities of Florham Park and Chatham Borough to the west and southwest, and the Union County communities of Summit to the south, and Springfield and Union Townships to the southeast.

The West Branch of the Rahway River runs through downtown Millburn.

Arts and culture

Paper Mill Playhouse entrance
The Paper Mill Playhouse is one of the oldest regional theaters
Milburn NJ clock
Clock tower at the intersection of Main and Essex Streets
Taylor Park Millburn New Jersey
Taylor Park
  • Paper Mill Playhouse is a 1,200-seat regional theater established in 1938, that has been officially designated as the "State Theatre of New Jersey".
  • B'nai Israel synagogue was designed by architect Percival Goodman and features works by Herbert Ferber, Adolph Gottlieb and Robert Motherwell.

Parks and recreation

  • Cora Hartshorn Arboretum and Bird Sanctuary - A site owned by the daughter of Short Hills founder Stewart Hartshorn, the 16 acres (6.5 ha) park with its 3 miles (4.8 km) of trails was donated to the township in 1958.
  • South Mountain Reservation, an Essex County nature reserve covering more than 2,000 acres (810 ha) of land in Millburn, Maplewood and West Orange.
  • Old Short Hills Park, Gero Park and Taylor Park.

Fishing and kayaking is available on the Rahway River.

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1860 1,630
1870 1,675 2.8%
1880 1,743 4.1%
1890 2,437 39.8%
1900 2,837 16.4%
1910 3,720 31.1%
1920 4,633 24.5%
1930 8,602 85.7%
1940 11,652 35.5%
1950 14,560 25.0%
1960 18,799 29.1%
1970 21,089 12.2%
1980 19,543 −7.3%
1990 18,630 −4.7%
2000 19,765 6.1%
2010 20,149 1.9%
Est. 2015 20,363 3.0%
Population sources: 1860-1920
1860-1870 1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

Millburn has one of the largest Jewish communities in Essex County, along with neighboring Livingston and South Orange. Philip Roth's popular novel Goodbye, Columbus about a newly affluent Jewish family in the 1950s, was set in the Short Hills section of Millburn, and a key scene takes place at the Millburn High School track.

The township has attracted professionals moving out of Manhattan, thanks to direct train service to Penn Station.

In a report performed by the United Way of Northern New Jersey based on 2012 data, around 11% of Millburn households were classified as "Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed" households (below a threshold of $50,000 for households below 65, below $35,000 for those over 65), struggling with basic necessities, such as housing, childcare, food, health care, and transportation, compared to 38% statewide and 47% in Essex County.

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 20,149 people, 6,813 households, and 5,553 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,161.3 per square mile (834.5/km2). There were 7,106 housing units at an average density of 762.2 per square mile (294.3/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 80.17% (16,154) White, 1.63% (329) Black or African American, 0.03% (6) Native American, 15.66% (3,155) Asian, 0.02% (5) Pacific Islander, 0.51% (103) from other races, and 1.97% (397) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.49% (703) of the population.

There were 6,813 households out of which 48.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 72.2% were married couples living together, 7.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 18.5% were non-families. 15.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.96 and the average family size was 3.32.

In the township, the population was spread out with 32.3% under the age of 18, 4.2% from 18 to 24, 21.1% from 25 to 44, 31.2% from 45 to 64, and 11.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.0 years. For every 100 females there were 95.3 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 90.8 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $165,603 (with a margin of error of +/- $9,937) and the median family income was $194,421 (+/- $14,492). Males had a median income of $136,031 (+/- $14,137) versus $81,152 (+/- $9,621) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $84,663 (+/- $5,971). About 1.3% of families and 1.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.9% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 19,765 people, 7,015 households, and 5,604 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,106.2 people per square mile (813.6/km2). There were 7,158 housing units at an average density of 762.8 per square mile (294.6/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 88.91% White, 8.40% Asian, 1.10% African American, 0.05% Native American, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.43% from other races, and 1.08% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.04% of the population. The most common reported ancestries in 2000 were 13.5% Italian, 12.2% Irish, 11.7% Russian and 11.5% German.

There were 7,015 households out of which 44.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 71.6% were married couples living together, 6.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.1% were non-families. 17.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.82 and the average family size was 3.19.

In the township the population was spread out with 30.2% under the age of 18, 3.2% from 18 to 24, 28.4% from 25 to 44, 25.1% from 45 to 64, and 13.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 94.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.2 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $130,848, and the median income for a family was $158,888. Males had a median income of $100,000+ versus $51,603 for females. The per capita income for the township was $76,796. About 1.2% of families and 1.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.4% of those under age 18 and 1.0% of those age 65 or over.

Community organizations

Down the Block, Inc., a 501(c)3 organization, was formed by residents in 2009 to pay bills on behalf of Millburn residents in financial distress.

New Eyes for the Needy is a non-profit organization started in 1932 as New Eyes (incorporated 1948) and based in Short Hills, which provides people in the United States with eyeglasses and sends recycled eyeglasses to needy people overseas.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 100.77 miles (162.17 km) of roadways, of which 81.45 miles (131.08 km) were maintained by the municipality, 15.65 miles (25.19 km) by Essex County and 3.67 miles (5.91 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

A variety of roads serve Millburn. Major county routes include CR 510, CR 527 and CR 577. Route 24 and Route 124 also pass through along the southwestern border with Summit. Interstate 78 passes through the very southern tip of the township in the area of exit 49.

Public transportation

Milburn sta house jeh
Milburn train station

Millburn Township is served by two NJ Transit railroad stations along the Morristown Line, providing service to Newark Broad Street Station, Secaucus Junction, and New York Penn Station, as well as to Hoboken Terminal. The Millburn station is located at the intersection of Essex Street and Lackawanna Place near the Millburn Free Public Library, and the Short Hills station is located near The Crescent Street between Hobart Avenue and Chatham Road. The latter station is also the site of the Millburn-Short Hills Historical Society's museum.

New Jersey Transit operates bus service in the township, including the 70 route that stops at the Millburn railroad station on a route between Newark and Livingston, with local service on the 873 route.

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