Union Township, Union County, New Jersey facts for kids

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Not to be confused with Union Township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey; Union City, New Jersey in Hudson County; or the historical Union Township, Hudson County, New Jersey.
Union Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Union
Connecticut Farms Presbyterian Church
Connecticut Farms Presbyterian Church
Map of Union Township in Union County. Inset: Location of Union County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Union Township in Union County. Inset: Location of Union County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Union Township, Union County, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Union Township, Union County, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Union
Incorporated November 23, 1808
Area
 • Total 23.548 km2 (9.092 sq mi)
 • Land 23.494 km2 (9.071 sq mi)
 • Water 0.055 km2 (0.021 sq mi)  0.23%
Area rank 219th of 566 in state
3rd of 21 in county
Elevation 38 m (125 ft)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 56,642
 • Estimate (2015) 58,128
 • Rank 25th of 566 in state
2nd of 21 in county
 • Density 2,410.9/km2 (6,244.3/sq mi)
 • Density rank 80th of 566 in state
9th of 21 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07083
Area code(s) 908
FIPS code 3403974480
GNIS feature ID 0882212
Website http://www.uniontownship.com

Union is a township in Union County, New Jersey, United States. In the 18th century, the area that is now Union was then called Connecticut Farms. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township population was 56,642, the highest recorded in any decennial census, reflecting an increase of 2,237 (+4.1%) from the 54,405 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 4,381 (+8.8%) from the 50,024 counted in the 1990 Census.

History

Settled in 1667, Union was the third English speaking settlement in New Jersey after Elizabeth and Newark, with the area that is now Union then called Connecticut Farms.

Union Township was the site of the Battle of Connecticut Farms, one of the last battles between British and American forces during the American Revolutionary War. On June 6, 1780, British troops, led by Hessian General Wilhelm von Knyphausen, boarded boats on Staten Island bound for Elizabeth, New Jersey. At midnight, 5,000 troops started to land. They expected the Continental Army to give little resistance, believing that they were tired of the war and were poorly fed and paid. They also expected the citizens of New Jersey to welcome them. They were wrong on both counts and were unable to make their way to and through the Hobart Gap.

Union Township was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on November 23, 1808, from portions of Elizabeth Township, while the area was still part of Essex County. It became part of the newly formed Union County on March 19, 1857. Portions of the township have been taken to form Linden Township (March 4, 1861), Roselle Park, (March 22, 1901), Kenilworth (May 13, 1907) and Hillside (April 3, 1913). In 1946, a group of residents pushed for the township's name to be changed to "Connecticut Farms", citing the potential benefits to area residents and businesses from the broad awareness of the historical significance of the name.

Geography

The Township of Union is located on the northern-central edge of Union County and is bordered by eight municipalities: Hillside to the east, Elizabeth to the southeast, Roselle Park and Kenilworth to the south and Springfield Township to the west. Northwest of the township lies Millburn, to the north lies Maplewood and to the northeast lies Irvington, all in Essex County.

According to the United States Census Bureau, Union township had a total area of 9.092 square miles (23.548 km2), including 9.071 square miles (23.494 km2) of land and 0.021 square miles (0.055 km2) of water (0.23%).

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Battle Hill, Connecticut Farms, Galloping Hill, Headlentown, Putnam Manor, Salem, Townley and Vauxhall.

Neighborhoods

  • Five Points, area around the junction of Galloping Hill Road, Chestnut Street, Salem Road, Delaware Avenue, Walton Avenue, and Tucker Avenue.
  • Brookside Heights (Curreyville), west of Vauxhall Road.
  • Vauxhall, area of Union north of I-78 and west of Stuyvesant Avenue,with its own ZIP code 07088.
  • Union Center, area around the intersection of Morris and Stuyvesant Avenues.
  • Putnam Ridge, a section between Suburban Road, Morris Avenue, Twin Oaks Road, and Colonial Avenue.
  • Putnam Manor, an historic section between Colonial Avenue and Salem Road.
  • Orchard Park
  • Parkside Manor, a three-road section off of Union Terrace, featured in the movie She Devil with Roseanne Barr.
  • Larchmont Estates, area bordered by Larchmont Reservation (NW and NE edges), Morris Avenue (SW), Liberty Avenue (SE), and Joe Collins Park/Larchmont Reservation (NE edge).
  • Green Lane, new community between Kean University and Union Station.
  • Fairway Drive, community bordering the Galloping Hill Golf Course.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 1,428
1820 1,567 9.7%
1830 1,409 −10.1%
1840 1,482 5.2%
1850 1,662 12.1%
1860 1,812 9.0%
1870 2,314 * 27.7%
1880 2,418 4.5%
1890 2,846 17.7%
1900 4,315 51.6%
1910 3,419 * −20.8%
1920 3,962 * 15.9%
1930 16,472 315.7%
1940 24,730 50.1%
1950 38,004 53.7%
1960 51,499 35.5%
1970 53,077 3.1%
1980 50,184 −5.5%
1990 50,024 −0.3%
2000 54,405 8.8%
2010 56,642 4.1%
Est. 2015 58,128 2.6%
Population sources:
1810-1920 1840
1850-1870 1850 1870
1880-1890 1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010
* = Lost territory in previous decade.

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 56,642 people, 19,556 households, and 14,276 families residing in the township. The population density was 6,244.3 per square mile (2,410.9/km2). There were 20,250 housing units at an average density of 2,232.4 per square mile (861.9/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 53.78% (30,464) White, 28.98% (16,417) Black or African American, 0.14% (80) Native American, 10.60% (6,003) Asian, 0.04% (24) Pacific Islander, 4.06% (2,297) from other races, and 2.40% (1,357) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 14.94% (8,465) of the population.

There were 19,556 households out of which 31.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.7% were married couples living together, 14.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.0% were non-families. 23.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.82 and the average family size was 3.35.

In the township, the population was spread out with 21.1% under the age of 18, 10.7% from 18 to 24, 26.0% from 25 to 44, 28.2% from 45 to 64, and 14.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39.6 years. For every 100 females there were 89.7 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 85.6 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $73,722 (with a margin of error of +/- $4,858) and the median family income was $86,705 (+/- $3,822). Males had a median income of $54,811 (+/- $1,998) versus $47,144 (+/- $2,316) for females. The per capita income for the township was $31,135 (+/- $1,104). About 3.7% of families and 4.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.7% of those under age 18 and 5.6% of those age 65 or over.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census of 2000, there were 54,405 people, 19,534 households, and 14,162 families residing in the township. The population density was 5,968.1 people per square mile (2,303.3/km²). There were 20,001 housing units at an average density of 2,194.1 per square mile (846.8/km²). An example of a diverse city in the United States, the racial makeup of the township was 67.66% White, 19.76% African American, 0.15% Native American, 7.72% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 2.44% from other races, and 2.24% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.93% of the population.

There were 19,534 households out of which 32.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.5% were married couples living together, 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.5% were non-families. 23.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.25.

In the township the population was spread out with 22.3% under the age of 18, 8.9% from 18 to 24, 29.3% from 25 to 44, 22.3% from 45 to 64, and 17.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 87.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.2 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $59,173, and the median income for a family was $68,707. Males had a median income of $45,299 versus $35,604 for females. The per capita income for the township was $24,768. About 3.0% of families and 4.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.6% of those under age 18 and 5.5% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 145.85 miles (234.72 km) of roadways, of which 120.11 miles (193.30 km) were maintained by the municipality, 11.43 miles (18.39 km) by Union County and 12.46 miles (20.05 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 1.85 miles (2.98 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.

Union is traversed by the Garden State Parkway, Interstate 78, U.S. Route 22 and Route 82 (Morris Avenue).

The Parkway connects Kenilworth in the south to Hillside in the north. The Parkway includes interchanges 139A (Chestnut Street) / 139B (Route 82 West Union), interchanges 140 (Route 22 / Route 82 west) / 140A (Route 22 / Route 82 west) and interchange 141 (Vauxhall Road / Union).

Public transportation

NJ Transit offers rail service at the Union train station providing service on the Raritan Valley Line (formerly the mainline of the Lehigh Valley Railroad) to Newark Penn Station. The station opened in 2003 and includes a parking lot with over 450 spaces.

NJ Transit also provides bus service to New York City and New Jersey points on the 113, 114 and 117 routes to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan, on the 65, 66 70 and 94 routes to Newark and local service on the 26 and 52.

Former Rahway Valley Railroad freight line, now abandoned, crosses through Union. This line, presently licensed to Morristown and Erie Railway, is in the process of revitalization after which it will link to NJ Transit's Morris and Essex Lines at Summit and connect to Staten Island.

Newark Liberty International Airport is approximately 6 miles (9.7 km) east of Union.

Notable buildings

  • The Union Watersphere, for many years the tallest water tower of its type in the world, stands 212 feet tall, holds 250,000 gallons of drinking water and is now also used as a cell phone tower. The landmark and icon inspired a former Union resident to create a website and museum (in Austin, Texas) dedicated to it.
  • Union is home to several houses constructed totally of poured concrete, an experiment of Thomas Edison. The homes on Ingersoll Terrace include poured concrete interior walls with formed concrete plumbing.
  • Union is home to a building in the shape of a ship at 2262 U.S. Route 22. Originally a restaurant and night club, it has changed ownership over the years, becoming a furniture store known as "The Flagship" and later The Wiz Home Electronics. It is currently a P. C. Richard & Son store.
  • Union is home to the largest Home Depot store in the United States, covering 217,000 square feet (20,200 m2).

Union Township, Union County, New Jersey Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.