Carter County, Tennessee facts for kids

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Coordinates: 36°18′N 82°7′W / 36.3°N 82.117°W / 36.3; -82.117

Carter County, Tennessee
Seal of Carter County, Tennessee
Map
Map of Tennessee highlighting Carter County
Location in the state of Tennessee
Map of the USA highlighting Tennessee
Tennessee's location in the U.S.
Statistics
Founded 1796
Seat Elizabethton
Largest City Elizabethton
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

348 sq mi (901 km²)
341 sq mi (883 km²)
6.4 sq mi (17 km²), 1.8%
Population
 - (2010)
 - Density

57,424
168/sq mi (65/km²)
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website: www.cartercountytn.gov
Named for: Landon Carter

Carter County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2010 census, the population was 57,424. Its county seat is Elizabethton. The county is named in honor of Landon Carter, an early settler active in the State of Franklin movement.

Carter County is part of the Johnson City, TN Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is a component of the Johnson City–KingsportBristol, TN-VA Combined Statistical Area, commonly known as the "Tri-Cities" region of Northeast Tennessee.

History

Carolinacolony
A map of the Province of Carolina

The area was originally claimed by Britain as part of the Clarendon settlements of the Province of Carolina, although actually populated at the time by the Cherokee.

The area was part of (though seldom actually administered by) the following jurisdictions in its early history:

Watauga Association

The county is named for General Landon Carter, the son of John Carter of Virginia, who was "chairman of the court" of the first majority-rule system of American democracy, known as the Watauga Association of 1772. The association was the first permanent settlement established outside the original thirteen American colonies and included the area that is today's Carter County. In 1775, the Association was absorbed into North Carolina by petition, becoming known thereafter as the Washington District.

As Wayne County in the State of Franklin

J. G. M. Ramsey records within his 1853 Annals of Tennessee that the State of Franklin established Wayne County from sections of both Washington County and a part of Wilkes County "lying west of the extreme heights of the Apalachian or Alleghany Mountains, into a separate and distinct county by the name of Wayne... This new county covered the same territory now embraced in the limits of Carter and Johnson counties."

The county seat, Elizabethton, is named for Carter's wife, Elizabeth MacLin Carter.

Civil War

Like most East Tennessee counties, Carter Countians opposed secession on the eve of the Civil War. In Tennessee's Ordinance of Secession referendum on June 8, 1861, Carter Countians rejected secession by a vote of 1,343 to 86. A railroad bridge at Carter's Depot (modern Watauga) was among those targeted by the East Tennessee bridge-burning conspiracy in November 1861.

Early railroad

Carter County was served by the narrow gauge East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad (The ET&WNC, nicknamed "Tweetsie") until the line ceased operations in 1950.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 348 square miles (900 km2), of which 341 square miles (880 km2) is land and 6.4 square miles (17 km2) (1.8%) is water.

Carter County is situated entirely within the Blue Ridge Mountains, specifically the Unaka Range and the Iron Mountains. Roan Mountain, which at 6,285 feet (1,916 m) is the highest point in Tennessee outside the Great Smoky Mountains, straddles the county's eastern border with North Carolina. The county's boundary with Sullivan County is defined as the ridgeline of Holston Mountain.

Lakes

  • Watauga Lake
  • Wilbur Reservoir (immediately below the TVA Watauga Dam Lat: 36.3408 Lon: -82.1203]
  • Ripshin Lake (6 km southwest of Roan Mountain Lat: 36.1838646 Lon: -82.1356583)

Rivers

  • Watauga River
  • Doe River

Waterfalls

BlueHole
The main waterfall at Blue Hole Falls, located northeast of Elizabethton on Holston Mountain.
  • CTF015 Big Laurel Br. Falls 50'
    lake
  • CTF001 Blue Hole Falls (4) 45'
    Cherokee National Forest
  • CTF018 Boof Falls? 12'
    Cherokee National Forest
  • CTF002 Coon Den Falls 50'
    Cherokee National Forest
  • CTF003 Dennis Cove Falls 25'
    wilderness
  • CTF005 Firescald Branch Falls
    wilderness
  • CTF016 Five Eights
    lake
  • CTF006 Jones Falls 100'
    Cherokee National Forest
  • CTF007 Laurel Falls 55'
    wilderness
  • CTF010 Laurel Falls (m) 25'
    wilderness
  • CTF011 Laurel Falls (u) 25'
    wilderness
  • CTF014 Mountaineer Falls 20'
    Cherokee National Forest
  • CTF012 North Fork Stony Creek Falls 30'
    Cherokee National Forest
  • CTF008 Sally Cove Creek Falls 25'
  • CTF009 Twisting Falls 30'
    Cherokee National Forest
  • CTF013 Splash Dam Falls? 25'
    Cherokee National Forest
  • CTF017 Watauga Falls? 18'
    Cherokee National Forest

Adjacent counties

National protected areas

  • Appalachian Trail (part)
  • Cherokee National Forest (part)

State protected areas

  • Hampton Creek Cove State Natural Area
  • Roan Mountain State Park
  • Sycamore Shoals State Historic Area
  • Watauga River Bluffs State Natural Area

Major highways

  • US-19E
  • US-321
  • SR-37
  • SR-67
  • [[Template:Infobox road/TN/link Sec|Template:Infobox road/TN/abbrev Sec]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/TN/link Sec|Template:Infobox road/TN/abbrev Sec]]
  • SR-159
  • [[Template:Infobox road/TN/link Sec|Template:Infobox road/TN/abbrev Sec]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/TN/link Sec|Template:Infobox road/TN/abbrev Sec]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/TN/link Sec|Template:Infobox road/TN/abbrev Sec]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/TN/link Sec|Template:Infobox road/TN/abbrev Sec]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/TN/link Sec|Template:Infobox road/TN/abbrev Sec]]

Climate

Climate data for Carter County, Tennessee (Bristol-Johnson City)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 43.7
(6.5)
48.0
(8.89)
58.9
(14.94)
67.4
(19.67)
75.2
(24)
82.2
(27.89)
84.6
(29.22)
84.1
(28.94)
79.1
(26.17)
69.1
(20.61)
58.2
(14.56)
48.1
(8.94)
66.6
(19.22)
Daily mean °F (°C) 34.0
(1.11)
37.4
(3)
47.2
(8.44)
55.2
(12.89)
63.4
(17.44)
71.1
(21.72)
74.4
(23.56)
73.6
(23.11)
67.9
(19.94)
56.7
(13.72)
47.0
(8.33)
38.2
(3.44)
55.5
(13.06)
Average low °F (°C) 24.3
(-4.28)
26.8
(-2.89)
35.4
(1.89)
43.0
(6.11)
51.6
(10.89)
59.9
(15.5)
64.1
(17.83)
63.1
(17.28)
56.6
(13.67)
44.2
(6.78)
35.9
(2.17)
28.2
(-2.11)
44.4
(6.89)
Rainfall inches (mm) 3.2
(81)
3.4
(86)
3.7
(94)
3.3
(84)
3.8
(97)
3.5
(89)
4.3
(109)
3.2
(81)
3.3
(84)
2.6
(66)
2.9
(74)
3.4
(86)
40.7
(1,034)
Snowfall inches (cm) 5.2
(13.2)
4.2
(10.7)
2.3
(5.8)
0.4
(1)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.9
(2.3)
2.6
(6.6)
15.6
(39.6)
Humidity 59.0 71.5 69.0 67.0 69.5 73.0 75.0 76.5 76.5 74.0 68.5 69.5 74.0
Source: Climate-zone.com

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1800 4,813
1810 4,190 −12.9%
1820 4,835 15.4%
1830 6,414 32.7%
1840 5,372 −16.2%
1850 6,296 17.2%
1860 7,124 13.2%
1870 7,909 11.0%
1880 10,019 26.7%
1890 13,389 33.6%
1900 16,688 24.6%
1910 19,838 18.9%
1920 21,488 8.3%
1930 29,223 36.0%
1940 35,127 20.2%
1950 42,432 20.8%
1960 41,578 −2.0%
1970 42,575 2.4%
1980 50,205 17.9%
1990 51,505 2.6%
2000 56,742 10.2%
2010 57,424 1.2%
Est. 2015 56,486 −1.6%
U.S. Decennial Census
1790-1960 1900-1990
1990-2000 2010-2014
USA Carter County, Tennessee.csv age pyramid
Age pyramid Carter County

As of the census of 2000, there were 56,742 people, 23,486 households, and 16,346 families residing in the county. The population density was 166 people per square mile (64/km²). There were 25,920 housing units at an average density of 76 per square mile (29/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 97.49% White, 1.00% Black or African American, 0.20% Native American, 0.26% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.27% from other races, and 0.78% from two or more races. 0.89% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 23,486 households out of which 28.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.90% were married couples living together, 11.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.40% were non-families. 26.50% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.00% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.83.

In the county, the population was spread out with 21.40% under the age of 18, 9.20% from 18 to 24, 29.00% from 25 to 44, 25.40% from 45 to 64, and 15.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 94.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.60 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $27,371, and the median income for a family was $33,825. Males had a median income of $26,394 versus $19,687 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,678. About 12.80% of families and 16.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.00% of those under age 18 and 16.00% of those age 65 or over.

Communities

Elk-Avenue-Elizabethton-tn1
Elk Avenue in Elizabethton
Roan-Mountain-19E-tn1
U.S. 19E in Roan Mountain

Cities

Census-designated places

Unincorporated communities


Carter County, Tennessee Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.