Old Bridge Township, New Jersey facts for kids

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Old Bridge Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Old Bridge
Cheesequake State Park
Cheesequake State Park
Map of Old Bridge Township in Middlesex County. Inset: Location of Middlesex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Old Bridge Township in Middlesex County. Inset: Location of Middlesex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Old Bridge Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Old Bridge Township, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Middlesex
Incorporated March 2, 1869 (as Madison Township)
Renamed November 5, 1975 (as Old Bridge Township)
Area
 • Total 40.783 sq mi (105.627 km2)
 • Land 38.060 sq mi (98.575 km2)
 • Water 2.723 sq mi (7.052 km2)  6.68%
Area rank 52nd of 566 in state
3rd of 25 in county
Elevation 46 ft (14 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 65,375
 • Estimate (2015) 67,215
 • Rank 18th of 566 in state
3rd of 25 in county
 • Density 1,717.7/sq mi (663.2/km2)
 • Density rank 312th of 566 in state
22nd of 25 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 08857 - Old Bridge
08859 - Parlin
08879 - Laurence Harbor
07721 - Cliffwood Beach
07747 - Matawan*
08879 - South Amboy*
Area code(s) 732
FIPS code 3402354705
GNIS feature ID 0882158
Website www.oldbridge.com

Old Bridge Township is a township in Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township had a total population of 65,375, reflecting an increase of 4,919 (+8.1%) from the 60,456 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 3,981 (+7.0%) from the 56,475 counted in the 1990 Census. As of the 2010 Census, the township was the state's 18th largest municipality, after being the state's 21st most-populous municipality in 2000. Old Bridge is a bedroom suburb of New York City located across the Raritan Bay from Staten Island, and it is about 25 miles (40 km) from Manhattan, and about 30 miles (48 km) south of Newark.

What is now Old Bridge Township was originally incorporated as Madison Township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 2, 1869, from portions of South Amboy Township (now City of South Amboy). In a referendum held on November 5, 1975, voters approved changing the township's name to Old Bridge Township by a margin of 7,150 votes to 4,888. The township's name was changed to avoid confusion with the borough of Madison in Morris County. Use of the name Old Bridge for a location "on the Camden and Amboy Railroad, about eight miles (13 km) beyond South Amboy" or "about seven miles (11 km) from South Amboy" goes back, however, to at least 1853. Initially, the township was made up of farms and the population grew slowly. In 1880, the population was 1,662 and in 1950 it had reached 7,365. Over the next decade, a building boom started and farms gave way to developments, and the population grew to 22,772 by 1960. The 1980 census cited 51,406 people. The township saw major changes with the extension of Route 18 to the shore.

The township was named as a contender for the title of one of the best places to live in the United States by Money magazine in both 2005 and 2007.

In 2016, SafeWise named Old Bridge Township as the sixth-safest city in America to raise a child; the township was the second-highest ranked of the 12 communities in New Jersey included on the list.

History

The first inhabitants of the area known as Old Bridge, were the Lenni Lenape Native Americans. Those who settled in Old Bridge were known as the Unami, or "people down the river." They, like many people today, migrated to the shore along the Raritan each summer from their hunting grounds in the north. When the English gained control from the Dutch in 1664, the state was divided into two provinces, East Jersey and West Jersey. In 1683, the general assembly of East Jersey defined the boundaries of Middlesex County and the three other original counties (Bergen, Essex and Monmouth) as containing all plantations on both sides of the Raritan River, as far as Cheesequake Harbor to the east, then southwest to the Provincial line, with the southwest line being the border of Monmouth and Middlesex Counties and the Township's southern border.

Thomas Warne, one of the original 24 proprietors of East Jersey, was listed as a landowner of this area, and his son is said to have been the earliest white resident residing in the Cheesequake area in 1683. John and Susannah Brown were granted a 1,000 acres (4.0 km2) land grant from the King of England in 1737. They called the area Brownville, and today this part of town is now known as Browntown. Other important proprietors of Old Bridge were the Bowne, Morgan, Letts, Brown, Tone, Herbert and Cottrell families, who date back as some of the first landowners of Old Bridge.

In 1684, South Amboy Township was formed. At that time, it covered an area that now consists of the Townships of Monroe and Old Bridge, the Borough of Sayreville and the City of South Amboy. The Township covers 42 square miles (110 km2) that separated from South Amboy on March 2, 1869, and was originally called Madison Township. In 1975, the name was changed by referendum to the Township of Old Bridge. The purpose of doing this was to formulate just one postal designations and ZIP code for the township and to differentiate the township from the Borough of Madison in Morris County. Old Bridge derives its name from the fact that the first bridge spanning the South River was built there, and as other bridges were built across the river the first one became known as "the Old Bridge." Prior to that, it was known as South River Bridge."

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 40.783 square miles (105.627 km2), including 38.060 square miles (98.575 km2) of land and 2.723 square miles (7.052 km2) of water (6.68%).

Brownville (2010 population of 2,383), Laurence Harbor (2010 population of 6,536), Madison Park (2010 population of 7,144) and Old Bridge CDP (2010 population of 23,753) are unincorporated communities and census-designated places (CDPs) located within Old Bridge Township. Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names within Old Bridge Township include Browntown, Brunswick Gardens, Cheesequake, Cottrell Corners, East Spotswood, Matchaponix, Moerls Corner, Morristown, Parlin, Redshaw Corner, Runyon, Sayre Woods South, South Old Bridge and Texas.

Old Bridge Township shares a border with New York City, sharing a boundary with the borough of Staten Island across Raritan Bay. The township also borders East Brunswick Township, Monroe Township, Sayreville and Spotswood in Middlesex County; and Aberdeen Township, Manalapan Township, Marlboro Township and Matawan in Monmouth County.

Major streams/rivers

  • Raritan Bay
  • South River
  • Matchaponix Brook
  • Deep Run
  • Tennets Brook
  • Barclay Brook
  • Cheesequake Creek

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 1,870
1880 1,662 −11.1%
1890 1,520 −8.5%
1900 1,671 9.9%
1910 1,621 −3.0%
1920 1,808 11.5%
1930 2,566 41.9%
1940 3,803 48.2%
1950 7,366 93.7%
1960 22,772 209.2%
1970 48,715 113.9%
1980 51,515 5.7%
1990 56,475 9.6%
2000 60,456 7.0%
2010 65,375 8.1%
Est. 2015 67,215 2.8%
Population sources: 1870-1920
1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 65,375 people, 23,777 households, and 17,333 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,717.7 per square mile (663.2/km2). There were 24,638 housing units at an average density of 647.3 per square mile (249.9/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 74.06% (48,418) White, 6.21% (4,063) Black or African American, 0.20% (129) Native American, 14.34% (9,374) Asian, 0.02% (10) Pacific Islander, 2.72% (1,780) from other races, and 2.45% (1,601) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 10.81% (7,064) of the population.

There were 23,777 households out of which 33.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.5% were married couples living together, 10.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.1% were non-families. 22.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.73 and the average family size was 3.25.

In the township, the population was spread out with 22.8% under the age of 18, 7.8% from 18 to 24, 27.2% from 25 to 44, 30.1% from 45 to 64, and 12.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.1 years. For every 100 females there were 95.2 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 92.5 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $82,640 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,053) and the median family income was $98,634 (+/- $2,857). Males had a median income of $67,487 (+/- $3,364) versus $48,856 (+/- $3,104) for females. The per capita income for the township was $35,666 (+/- $1,152). About 3.1% of families and 4.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.3% of those under age 18 and 6.6% of those age 65 or over.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 60,456 people, 21,438 households, and 15,949 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,587.4 people per square mile (612.8/km²). There were 21,896 housing units at an average density of 574.9 per square mile (222.0/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 79.48% White, 10.82% Asian, 5.30% African American, 0.16% Native American, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 1.87% from other races and 2.32% from two or more races. 7.57% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 21,438 households out of which 37.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.2% were married couples living together, 9.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.6% were non-families. 21.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.80 and the average family size was 3.30.

In the township the population was spread out with 25.9% under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 33.6% from 25 to 44, 22.9% from 45 to 64, and 10.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 95.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.7 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $64,707, and the median income for a family was $74,045. Males had a median income of $51,978 versus $35,462 for females. The per capita income for the township was $26,814. About 3.0% of families and 4.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.0% of those under age 18 and 7.2% of those age 65 or over.

Township attractions

  • Cheesequake State Park
  • Laurence Harbor Beachfront
  • John Piccolo Arena
  • Old Bridge Airport
  • Township parks include Veterans Park and Geick Park

Community and historical information

  • Old Bridge has the 14th worst superfund site in the United States. That area is fenced off along Waterworks Road, near Cheesequake Road. This area has one chemical plant still operating, Old Bridge Chemical. A former plant, Ciba Chemical closed several years ago and a bulk of the plant was demolished, only the office building remains.
  • Many small ponds in the area are remnants of clay pits dug in the 19th century, as clay was a major industry. The Perrine clay pit was located near Route 9 and Ernston Road.
  • The Runyon coal yards were located off Bordentown Avenue and Cheesequake Road, where Stavola Asphalt Construction Company (formerly Manzos Contracting) currently operates. Rail cars at this yard were used to transport their loads to the South Amboy docks, where the coal was shipped to New York City.
  • Pilings of former docks can be found by foot traversing Steamboat Landing Road, also known as Dock Road, which is the extension of Cottrell Road at its intersection with Route 34.
  • The Ochwald Brickworks, now the site of Bridgepointe Development in Laurence Harbor, began operation in 1910 and continued operation into the early 1960s. Behind the Bridgepointe Development and far into the woodline and field, old bricks can still be found.
  • The Kepec Chemical Company in the Genoa section (off County Road) is where the Rosenbergs allegedly contacted Russian spies in 1950. The FBI conducted surveillance of the building at the corner of Biondi Avenue and Gordon Street. Only a few bricks remain to mark this location at the foot of Columbus Avenue. In the past 10 years, this old Genoa section has experienced new houses and the demolition of old.
  • A mass grave in the Ernst Memorial Cemetery off Ernston Road holds the remains of over a dozen unidentified victims of the T. A. Gillespie Company Shell Loading Plant explosion of 1918. This plant exploded in the Morgan section of neighboring Sayreville killing over an estimated 100 persons. Shock waves were felt as far north as Newark.
  • A horse-racing track used to be located where present day Lakeridge development now stands (near the border with Matawan Borough.)
  • A circular car racing track (early 1950s to approximately 1982) used to be located off CR516 where the Whispering Pines Development is now. No visible trace remains.
  • Cheesequake State Park, one of the oldest in the country, opening on June 22, 1940, is located in Old Bridge. Located near the Garden State Parkway exit 120, Route 34 and Route 35, the park is often crowded by sunbathers, picnics, concert goers (nearby PNC Bank Arts Center) and tourists.
  • A Cold War-era Nike missile base is located off U.S. Route 9 on Jake Brown Road. Listed in Weird NJ as a haunted site, readers frequent this area and explore the fields where former base worker residences once stood. The actual base was purchased by Old Bridge Township Board of Education and is currently used to store their own supplies and vehicles. The former underground silos and tunnels were purposely flooded and caved in when the base was closed.
  • Old Bridge Township Raceway Park, a racetrack that hosts Funny Car and drag racing, is located off Route 527 (Englishtown Road) near the township's border with Manalapan and Monroe.

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