Pike County, Kentucky facts for kids

Kids Encyclopedia Facts
Pike County, Kentucky
Map
Map of Kentucky highlighting Pike County
Location in the state of Kentucky
Map of the USA highlighting Kentucky
Kentucky's location in the U.S.
Statistics
Founded 1821
Seat Pikeville
Largest City Pikeville
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

789 sq mi (2,044 km²)
787 sq mi (2,038 km²)
1.8 sq mi (5 km²), 0.2%
Population
 - (2010)
 - Density

65,024
83/sq mi (32/km²)
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Named for: Zebulon Pike

Pike County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of the 2010 census, the population was 65,024. Its county seat is Pikeville. The county was founded in 1821.

Pike is Kentucky's easternmost county, it is also the state's largest county in terms of land area. Pike County is the 11th largest county in Kentucky in terms of population preceded by Bullitt County and followed by Christian County. Pike County is Kentucky's third largest banking center, with financial institutions and holding companies having more than $1 billion in assets. In the five years spanning 1995–2000, personal income increased by 28%, and the county's per capita income exceeded the national and state average growth rates of the past decade. Pike County is the seventy-first Kentucky county in order of creation.

With regard to the sale of alcohol, it is classified as a moist county—a county in which alcohol sales are prohibited (a dry county), but containing a "wet" city, in this case two cities: Pikeville and Coal Run Village, where package alcohol sales are allowed.

History

Pike County was founded on December 19, 1821. The county was named for General Zebulon Pike, the explorer who discovered Pikes Peak. Between 1860 and 1891 the Hatfield-McCoy feud raged in Pike and in bordering Mingo County, West Virginia. On May 6, 1893, Pikeville officially became a city and the county seat.

Pike County is also home to Paul E. Patton, former governor of Kentucky.

The Appalachian News Express, published in Pikeville, is preserved on microfilm by the University of Kentucky Libraries. The microfilm holdings are listed in a master negative database on the UK Libraries Preservation and Digital Programs website.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 789 square miles (2,040 km2), of which 787 square miles (2,040 km2) is land and 1.8 square miles (4.7 km2) (0.2%) is water. It is the largest county by area in Kentucky.

The main population areas of the county include the city of Pikeville and surrounding suburbs, Elkhorn City, and the unincorporated town of South Williamson.

Major highways

Pikeville Cut-Through from south
U.S. Route 23 passes through the Pikeville Cut-Through, the second largest earthmoving project in the Western Hemisphere.

Pike County has a total of 486.285 miles of classified roads.

  • US 23
  • US 52
  • US 119
  • US 460
  • [[Template:Infobox road/KY/link KY|Template:Infobox road/KY/abbrev KY]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/KY/link KY|Template:Infobox road/KY/abbrev KY]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/KY/link KY|Template:Infobox road/KY/abbrev KY]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/KY/link KY|Template:Infobox road/KY/abbrev KY]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/KY/link KY|Template:Infobox road/KY/abbrev KY]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/KY/link KY|Template:Infobox road/KY/abbrev KY]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/KY/link KY|Template:Infobox road/KY/abbrev KY]]

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1830 2,677
1840 3,567 33.2%
1850 5,365 50.4%
1860 7,384 37.6%
1870 9,562 29.5%
1880 13,001 36.0%
1890 17,378 33.7%
1900 22,686 30.5%
1910 31,679 39.6%
1920 49,477 56.2%
1930 63,267 27.9%
1940 71,122 12.4%
1950 81,154 14.1%
1960 68,264 −15.9%
1970 61,059 −10.6%
1980 81,123 32.9%
1990 72,583 −10.5%
2000 68,736 −5.3%
2010 65,024 −5.4%
Est. 2015 61,792 −5.0%
U.S. Decennial Census
1790–1960 1900–1990
1990–2000 2010–2013

As of the census of 2000, there were 68,736 people, 27,612 households, and 20,377 families residing in the county. The population density was 87 per square mile (34/km2). There were 30,923 housing units at an average density of 39 per square mile (15/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 98.35% White, 0.45% Black or African American, 0.11% Native American, 0.41% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.10% from other races, and 0.56% from two or more races. 0.65% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

The largest self-reported ancestry groups in Pike County, Kentucky are:

There were 27,612 households out of which 33.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.80% were married couples living together, 11.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.20% were non-families. 24.10% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 2.90.

The age distribution was 23.70% under the age of 18, 9.20% from 18 to 24, 30.00% from 25 to 44, 24.90% from 45 to 64, and 12.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 95.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $23,930, and the median income for a family was $29,302. Males had a median income of $32,332 versus $19,229 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,005. About 20.60% of families and 23.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 30.20% of those under age 18 and 16.10% of those age 65 or over. The zip codes 41502 (Pikeville), 41503 (South Williamson), and 41527 (Forest Hills) are the wealthiest portions of the county. 41502 is the 50th wealthiest zip code in Kentucky, 41503 is the 61st wealthiest, and 41527 is the 63rd wealthiest. South Williamson and Forest Hills are located on the Northeast side of the county. These three areas combine to 2,129 residents and make up around 3% of the county's population. The average income for these areas are $51,962 (41502), $49,345 (41503), and $48,484 (41527).

Communities

Cities

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated places

Images for kids


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