Rancho Cucamonga, California facts for kids

Kids Encyclopedia Facts
Rancho Cucamonga, California
City
City of Rancho Cucamonga
Downtown Rancho Cucamonga in December 2008
Downtown Rancho Cucamonga in December 2008
Flag of Rancho Cucamonga, California
Flag
Official seal of Rancho Cucamonga, California
Seal
Motto: A World Class Community
Location of Rancho Cucamonga in San Bernardino County
Location of Rancho Cucamonga in San Bernardino County
Country  United States
State  California
County Flag of San Bernardino County, California.png San Bernardino
Incorporated (city) November 30, 1977
Area
 • Total 39.871 sq mi (103.263 km2)
 • Land 39.851 sq mi (103.212 km2)
 • Water 0.0200 sq mi (0.051 km2)  0.05%
Elevation 1,207 ft (368 m)
Population (April 1, 2010)
 • Total 165,269
 • Estimate (2014) 174,305
 • Rank 3rd in San Bernardino County
27th in California
 • Density 4,145.09/sq mi (1,600.467/km2)
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP Code 91701, 91729, 91730, 91737, 91739
Area code(s) 909
FIPS code 06-59451
GNIS feature ID 1667908
Website www.cityofrc.us

Rancho Cucamonga is a suburban city situated at the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains in San Bernardino County, California. It is located 37 miles (60 km) east of Downtown Los Angeles. The city had a population of 165,269 in 2010 and an estimated population of 174,305 in 2014. The city experiences an average of 287 sunny days per year, compared to a national average of 205 days. Its climate is classified as warm Mediterranean, or Csa, under the Köppen climate classification system. The city's seal, which centers on a cluster of grapes, alludes to the city's agricultural history and intimate connections to wine-making.

The city's favorable location and host of public amenities have earned it numerous distinctions. Notably, Money Magazine ranked Rancho Cucamonga 42nd on its "Best Places to Live" list in 2006. In addition, Insider Magazine established one Rancho Cucamonga neighborhood as the 13th richest neighborhood in Southern California. All of the city's four public high schools earned the Silver distinction in a 2015 ranking of the nation's high schools by U.S. News & World Report. The city's proximity to major transportation hubs, airports, and highways has attracted the business of the nation's largest corporations including Coca-Cola, Nong Shim, Frito-Lay, and Amphastar Pharmaceuticals.

History

Rancho Cucamonga's first settlers were Native American. By 1200 A.D., Kukamongan Native Americans had established a village settlement in the area around present-day Red Hill, near the city's western border. Kukamonga derives its name from a Native-American word meaning "sandy place." Anthropologists have determined that this cluster of settlers likely belonged to the Gabrielino culture, at one time one of the largest concentrations of Native American peoples on the North American continent. In the 18th Century, following an expedition led by Gaspar de Portola, the land was incorporated into the Mission System established by Father Junipero Serra and his group of soldiers and Franciscan Monks.

John Rains House 2
The front of John Rains' House, a National Historic Place.

After a half-century of political jockeying in the region, the land finally came under the control of Juan Bautista Alvarado, governor of Mexico. On March 3, 1839, Alvarado granted 13,000 acres of land in the area called Cucamonga to Tubercio Tapia, a first-generation Spanish native of Los Angeles, successful merchant, and notorious smuggler. Tapia went on to establish the first winery in California on his newly deeded land. Rancho Cucamonga was purchased by John Rains and his wife in 1858. The Rains family's home, Casa de Rancho Cucamonga, was completed in 1860 and now appears on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the ensuing years the town prospered and grew. In 1887, irrigation tunnels were dug into Cucamonga Canyon by Chinese laborers and the Santa Fe Railroad was extended through the area. Among the town's economic mainstays was agriculture, including olives, peaches, citrus, and, most notably, vineyards. In 1913, the Pacific Electric Railway was extended through Rancho Cucamonga in an effort to improve crop transportation. Several landmarks in existence today pay tribute to the city's multicultural founding. In particular, Our Lady of Mt. Carmel remains as a relic of the area's Mexican agriculture laborers while the Chinatown House stands as a reminder of the Chinese immigrants who labored in constructing the area's infrastructure.

In 1977, the unincorporated communities of Alta Loma, Cucamonga, and Etiwanda voted to incorporate, forming the city of Rancho Cucamonga.

Grapeland

The former community of Grapeland, first settled in 1869, lay roughly between today's Victoria Groves Park and Central Park. There was a schoolhouse which also doubled as a church. In 1890 an irrigation district was formed and $200,000 in bonds were sold to pay for improvements. The Sierra Vista reservoir was built in 1886-87 by J.L. Scofield as the focal point of a network of irrigation pipes. The system was unused, however, because the bond issue was declared illegal. "Orchards and vineyards began to die," The Daily Report newspaper reported in a retrospective. "Residents moved out. The post office closed in 1905. Homes, buildings were destroyed or abandoned." The reservoir remained unused until 1956, when the Fontana Union Water Company filled it with 5 million gallons of water. The local school district was merged with the Etiwanda district in 1901. In 1957 the settlement was practically deserted, but there were still rabbit-proof stone walls marking boundaries of previous citrus orchards.

Geography

Rancho Cucamonga is part of the Inland Empire and San Bernardino County, a region that lies inland from the pacific coast and directly east of Los Angeles county. Rancho Cucamonga is located about 37 miles (60 km) east of Los Angeles, bordered by Upland to its West, Ontario to its South, the San Gabriel Mountains to its North and I-15 and Fontana to its East. The city sits atop an alluvial plain and views of Cucamonga Peak, one of the tallest peaks of the San Gabriel Mountains, are available from all points throughout the city. The city has a total area of 39.9 square miles (103 km2), 99.95% of which is land and 0.05% water.

Climate

The city's climate is classified as warm Mediterranean, or Csa, under the Köppen climate classification system. Yearly precipitation is 15.3 inches (390 mm) and the city experiences an average of 287 sunny days per year, compared to a national average of 205 days.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1980 55,250
1990 101,409 83.5%
2000 127,743 26.0%
2010 165,269 29.4%
Est. 2015 175,236 6.0%
U.S. Decennial Census

The city's estimated 2014 population was 174,305, a 36% increase since 2000.

2010

The 2010 United States Census reported that Rancho Cucamonga had a population of 165,269. The population density was 4,145.2 people per square mile (1,600.5/km²). The racial makeup of Rancho Cucamonga was 102,401 (62.0%) White (42.7% Non-Hispanic White), 15,246 (9.2%) African American, 1,134 (0.7%) Native American, 17,208 (10.4%) Asian, 443 (0.3%) Pacific Islander, 19,878 (12.0%) from other races, and 8,959 (5.4%) from two or more races. There were 57,688 residents of Hispanic or Latino ancestry, of any race (34.9%).

The census reported that 162,145 people (98.1% of the population) lived in households, 136 (0.1%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 2,988 (1.8%) were institutionalized.

Out of a total of 54,383 households, 23,055 (42.4%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 30,533 (56.1%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 7,514 (13.8%) had a female householder with no husband present, and 3,257 (6.0%) had a male householder with no wife present, as well as 2,995 (5.5%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships and 425 (0.8%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 9,956 households (18.3%) were made up of individuals and 2,679 (4.9%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.98. Over the 41,304 families (76.0% of all households), the average family size was 2.90.

The age distribution of the city was as follows: 42,550 people (25.7%) under the age of 18, 17,365 people (10.5%) aged 18 to 24, 48,600 people (29.4%) aged 25 to 44, 43,710 people (26.4%) aged 45 to 64, and 13,044 people (7.9%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34.5 years. For every 100 females there were 97.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.2 males.

There were 56,618 housing units at an average density of 1,420.1 per square mile (548.3/km²), of which 35,250 (64.8%) were owner-occupied, and 19,133 (35.2%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 1.6%; the rental vacancy rate was 5.2%. 110,570 people (66.9% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 51,575 people (31.2%) lived in rental housing units.

During 2009–2013, Rancho Cucamonga had a median household income of $77,835, with 6.9% of the population living below the federal poverty line.

2000

As of the census of 2000, there were 127,743 people, 40,863 households, and 31,832 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,317.0/km² (3,411.4/mi²). There were 42,134 housing units at an average density of 434.4/km² (1,125.2/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 66.53% White, 9.00% Asian, 0.67% Native American, 5.99% African American, 0.27% Pacific Islander, 13.25% from other races, and 5.41% from a biracial or multiracial background. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 27.78% of the population.

There are 40,863 households, of which 44.7% have children under the age of 18. 60.2% of households consist of a married couple living together. 12.8% have a female householder with no husband present. 22.1% were non-families. 16.8% of all households are single-person and 4.1% have a person of 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.04 and the average family size was 3.44.

In the city, the population spread is as follows: 29.9% are under the age of 18, 9.9% are from 18 to 24, 33.2% are from 25 to 44, 21.0% are from 45 to 64, and 6.1% are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 32 years. For every 100 females there were 100.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $78,428 and the median income for a family was $91,240. Males had a median income of $50,288 versus $40,952 for females. The per capita income for the city was $23,702. About 4.9% of families and 7.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.6% of those under age 18 and 7.3% of those age 65 or over.

1884 Cabinet Photo Ranch at Cucamunga San Bernardino CA
Orchards and farms, such as this Cucamonga ranch photographed in 1884, had dominated the landscape of the area until the land development boom in the late 20th century.

In popular culture

The name "Cucamonga" became well known to fans of Jack Benny's popular radio program, in which an announcer, voiced by Mel Blanc, would call out: "Train leaving on track five for Anaheim, Azusa and Cu-camonga!" This running gag became so well known that it eventually led to a statue of Benny in Cucamonga.

In the 1970s, Sesame Street often referenced Cucamonga, including the neologism "Cucamongaphobia".

Bugs Bunny cartoons feature numerous references to Cucamonga. In Mutiny On the Bunny, Cucamonga is one of the stickers on the boat at the end of the cartoon that Bugs is riding in. In My Bunny Lies Over The Sea, Bugs reads map directions that include "turn left at Cucamonga".

The city Rancho Cucamonga was featured in the hit 2000 stoner comedy film Next Friday starring Ice Cube and Mike Epps.

Rancho Cucamonga has been featured on the Comedy Central hit show Workaholics where it was nicknamed "Hollywood East". The main characters are said to live in the heart of Rancho Cucamonga.

Images for kids


Rancho Cucamonga, California Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.