Iron County, Missouri facts for kids

Kids Encyclopedia Facts
Iron County, Missouri
Map
Map of Missouri highlighting Iron County
Location in the state of Missouri
Map of the USA highlighting Missouri
Missouri's location in the U.S.
Statistics
Founded February 17, 1857
Seat Ironton
Largest City Ironton
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

552 sq mi (1,430 km²)
550 sq mi (1,424 km²)
1.8 sq mi (5 km²), 0.3%
PopulationEst.
 - (2015)
 - Density

10,125
19/sq mi (7/km²)
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Named for: Iron ore

Iron County is a county located in the Lead Belt region in the U.S. state of Missouri. As of the 2010 census, the population was 10,630. The largest city and county seat is Ironton. Iron County was officially organized on February 17, 1857, and was named after the abundance of iron ore found within its borders.

Iron County includes the 6-mile (9.7 km)-long, 2-mile (3.2 km)-wide Arcadia Valley, the site of Pilot Knob, Ironton, and Arcadia, communities established by immigrants in the 19th Century. The valley is surrounded by the Saint Francois Mountains of the Ozarks Plateau. Iron County is also home to dozens of mountains, including the 1,772-foot (540 m) Taum Sauk Mountain, the highest point in Missouri.

The county is home to a number of state parks and historical sites including Taum Sauk Mountain State Park, Elephant Rocks State Park and Fort Davidson State Historic Site as well as 96,047 acres (390 km2) of Mark Twain National Forest.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 552 square miles (1,430 km2), of which 550 square miles (1,400 km2) is land and 1.8 square miles (4.7 km2) (0.3%) is water.

Adjacent counties

National protected areas

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 5,842
1870 6,278 7.5%
1880 8,183 30.3%
1890 9,119 11.4%
1900 8,716 −4.4%
1910 8,563 −1.8%
1920 9,458 10.5%
1930 9,642 1.9%
1940 10,440 8.3%
1950 9,458 −9.4%
1960 8,041 −15.0%
1970 9,529 18.5%
1980 11,084 16.3%
1990 10,726 −3.2%
2000 10,697 −0.3%
2010 10,630 −0.6%
Est. 2015 10,125 −4.8%
U.S. Decennial Census
1790-1960 1900-1990
1990-2000 2010-2015

As of the census of 2000, there were 10,697 people, 4,197 households, and 2,963 families residing in the county. The population density was 7/km² (19/mi²). There were 4,907 housing units at an average density of 3/km² (9/mi²). The racial makeup of the county was 96.74% White, 1.56% Black or African American, 0.34% Native American, 0.09% Asian, 0.22% from other races, and 1.05% from two or more races. Approximately 0.58% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 4,197 households out of which 32.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.80% were married couples living together, 9.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.40% were non-families. 25.80% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 2.94.

In the county, the population was spread out with 25.00% under the age of 18, 7.80% from 18 to 24, 25.30% from 25 to 44, 24.80% from 45 to 64, and 17.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 94.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $31,276, and the median income for a family was $38,037. Males had a median income of $28,603 versus $16,615 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,717. About 13.80% of families and 19.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.60% of those under age 18 and 13.20% of those age 65 or over.

Religion

According to the Association of Religion Data Archives County Membership Report (2000), Iron County is a part of the Bible Belt with evangelical Protestantism being the majority religion. The most predominant denominations among residents in Iron County who adhere to a religion are Southern Baptists (56.62%), Methodists (10.60%), and Roman Catholics (7.82%).

Transportation

State highways

  • MO-21.svg Route 21
  • MO-32.svg Route 32
  • MO-49.svg Route 49
  • MO-72.svg Route 72

Railroads

  • The Iron Mountain Railroad, later incorporated into Union Pacific, runs through Arcadia Valley. Plans are underway to construct a train station in Arcadia to serve Amtrak's Texas Eagle.

Communities


Iron County, Missouri Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.