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Calabasas, California
City
City of Calabasas
Aerial view of Calabasas, near the intersection of Las Virgenes and U.S. Highway 101
Aerial view of Calabasas, near the intersection of Las Virgenes and U.S. Highway 101
Official logo of Calabasas, California
Logo
Location of Calabasas in Los Angeles County, California
Location of Calabasas in Los Angeles County, California
Country  United States
State  California
County Flag of Los Angeles County, California.svg Los Angeles
Incorporated April 5, 1991
Area
 • Total 13.3 sq mi (34.4 km2)
 • Land 13.249 sq mi (34.27 km2)
 • Water 0.051 sq mi (0.131 km2)  0.38%
Elevation 928 ft (283 m)
Population (April 1, 2010)
 • Total 23,058
 • Estimate (2013) 24,153
 • Density 1,734/sq mi (670.3/km2)
Time zone Pacific (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP codes 91301, 91302, 91372
Area code 818
FIPS code 06-09598
GNIS feature IDs 239994, 2409955
Website www.cityofcalabasas.com

Calabasas is a city in Los Angeles County, California, located in the hills west of the San Fernando Valley and in the northwest Santa Monica Mountains between Woodland Hills, Agoura Hills, West Hills, Hidden Hills, and Malibu, California. As of the 2010 census, the city's population was 23,058, up from 20,033 at the 2000 census. The city was formally incorporated in 1991. It is noted for its wealthy residents and gated neighborhoods.

The Leonis Adobe, an adobe structure in Old Town Calabasas, dates from 1844 and is one of the oldest surviving buildings in the greater Los Angeles area.

History

It is generally accepted that the name of Calabasas is derived from the Spanish calabaza meaning "pumpkin", "squash", or "gourd" (cf. calabash). Some historians hold the theory that Calabasas is derived from the Chumash word calahoosa which is said to mean "where the wild geese fly." Owing to vast presence of wild squash plants in the area, the squash theory is more prevalent among local residents. At the top of the Calabasas grade, which is east of Las Virgenes Road on the original El Camino Real, legend has it in 1824 a Basque rancher from Oxnard spilled a wagonload of pumpkins on the road en route to Los Angeles. The following spring, hundreds of pumpkin seeds sprouted alongside the road. The area was named Las Calabasas - the place where the pumpkins fell.

In honor of its namesake, the City of Calabasas and the Calabasas Chamber of Commerce hold an annual Pumpkin Festival in October, including carnival games, exhibits, demonstrations, and live entertainment. The festival has evolved from a small-town fair to a significant annual event. Though the current Pumpkin Festival is held at Juan Bautista de Anza Park in Calabasas, the original festival was believed to have taken place where the traveling wagon carrying pumpkins overturned and started the area's first pumpkin patch.

The city's official logo, depicting a red-tailed hawk flying over the Santa Monica Mountains, symbolizes a commitment to preserving the community's natural beauty and semirural quality of life. This logo is featured on the Calabasas city flag which is flown in front of City Hall and hangs in the City Council Chambers.

Geography

The city is located in the southwest corner of the San Fernando Valley and comprises a portion of the Santa Monica Mountains. It is 22 miles (35 km) away from downtown Los Angeles. It is bordered by the Woodland Hills area of Los Angeles to the northeast, Topanga to the east, Malibu to the south, Agoura Hills to the west, and Hidden Hills to the north. The historic El Camino Real runs east–west through Calabasas as the Ventura Freeway 101.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 13.0 square miles (34 km2). 12.9 square miles (33 km2) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) of it (0.38%) is covered by water.

In a part of the city near Calabasas High School and A.C. Stelle Middle School, all of the public streets are named patriotically. These include Declaration Ave., America Way, Liberty Bell Rd., Paul Revere Dr., Founder's Dr., Bon Homme Rd., and others.

One of the oldest neighborhoods in Calabasas is Park Moderne, or the Bird Streets. A former artists' colony, remnants remain of the club house, pool, and cabins scattered across streets with bird names, such as Meadow Lark, Blackbird, Bluebird, and Hummingbird located right behind Calabasas High School.

Communities

Calabasas California Condos and Hills 2003
Steeplechase

From Parkway Calabasas: Hidden Hills West, Calabasas Hills, Calabasas Park Estates, and The Oaks.

From Park Granada or Mulholland Drive: Mulholland Heights, Mulwood, Las Villas, Bellagio, The Ridge, Creekside, Clairidge, Calabasas Country Estates, Calabasas Highlands, Mountain Park, Abercrombie Ranch Estates, Cold Creek, and Park Moderne.

From Las Virgenes: Mountain View Estates, Monte Nido, Deer Springs, Stone Creek, El Encanto, Mont Calabasas, Malibu Canyon Park, The Colony at Calabasas, and Avalon Calabasas (formerly Archstone Calabasas).

Mont Calabasas, a community on Las Virgenes Road, was annexed into the city of Calabasas in 2011. Prior to annexation, the neighborhood was located in an unincorporated area of Los Angeles County.

From Lost Hills Road: Calabasas View, Saratoga Hills, Saratoga Ranch, Deer Springs, and Steeplechase.

The most celebrity-populated neighborhood in the general area of Calabasas is Hidden Hills, a separately incorporated city, which is featured on the E! TV series Keeping Up with the Kardashians.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
2000 20,033
2010 23,058 15.1%
Est. 2015 24,319 5.5%
U.S. Decennial Census

2010

The 2010 United States Census reported Calabasas to have a population of 23,058. The population density was 1,780.4 people per square mile (687.4/km²). The racial makeup of Calabasas was 19,341 (83.9%) White (79.5% non-Hispanic), 375 (1.6%) African American, 48 (0.2%) Native American, 1,993 (8.6%) Asian, 8 (less than 0.1%) Pacific Islander, 368 (1.6%) from other races, and 925 (4.0%) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 1,481 persons (6.4%).

The Census reported that 23,049 people lived in households, 9 lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 0 were institutionalized. Of 8,543 households, 3,320 (38.9%) had children under the age of 18 living at home, 5,124 (60.0%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 942 (11.0%) had a female householder with no husband present, 315 (3.7%) had a male householder with no wife present, 310 (3.6%) were unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 31 (0.4%) were same-sex married couples or partnerships. About 1,624 households (19.0%) were made up of individuals and 525 (6.1%) consisted of someone living alone who was age 65 or older. The average household size was 2.70. There were 6,381 families (74.7% of all households); the average family size was 3.11.

The population consisted of 5,841 people (25.3%) under age 18, 1,875 people (8.1%) age 18 to 24, 5,025 people (21.8%) age 25 to 44, 7,414 people (32.2%) age 45 to 64, and 2,903 people (12.6%) age 65 or older. The median age was 41.6 years. For every 100 females, there were 93.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.8 males age 18 and over.

The 8,878 housing units averaged 685.5 per square mile (264.7/km²), of which 6,287 (73.6%) were owner-occupied, and 2,256 (26.4%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 1.2%; the rental vacancy rate was 5.2%. Around 17,769 people (77.1% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 5,280 people (22.9%) lived in rental housing units.

According to the 2010 United States Census, Calabasas had a median household income of $124,583, with 6.6% of the population living below the federal poverty line.

2005

As of 2005, 23,123 people, 8,350 households, and 5,544 families resided in the city. The population density was 1,528.8 inhabitants per square mile (590.4/km²). The 8,350 housing units averaged 566.7 per square mile (218.9/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 85.92% White(including a large Iranian community and people of Jewish faith and ancestry), 2.18% Black or African American, 0.13% Native American, 7.71% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 1.31% from other races, and 2.71% from two or more races. About 4.74% of the population were Hispanics or Latinos of any race.

Of 8,350 households, 44.4% had children under the age of 18 living at home, 64.3% were married couples living together, 9.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.3% were not families. About 17.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 4.1% had someone living alone who was age 65 or older. The average household size was 2.76 and the average family size was 3.14.

The population consisted of 28.6% under age 18, 5.8% from 18 to 24, 29.1% from 25 to 44, 27.9% from 45 to 64, and 8.6% age 65 or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.2 males.

According to a 2007 estimate, the median income for a household in the city was $104,935, and for a family was $122,482. Males had a median income of $87,049 versus $46,403 for females. The per capita income for the city was $48,189. About 2.1% of families and 3.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.4% of those under age 18 and 1.7% of those age 65 or over.

Arts and culture

Annual events

The city sponsors many annual events including:

  • The Pumpkin Festival
  • Eggstravaganza
  • The Fine Arts Festival
  • The Fourth of July Spectacular
  • The Calabasas Film Festival

Tourism

Claretville of Calabasas / King Gillette Ranch

King-Gillette-Ranch-02
King Gillette Ranch, main residence courtyard, designed by Wallace Neff in the Spanish Colonial Revival architecture style in the 1920s
Leonis Adobe, Calabasas (2008)
Leonis Adobe in Old Town Calabasas

The Claretians (The Missionary Sons of the Immaculate Heart of Mary in Rome, or The Claretian Order) of the Roman Catholic Church had come to Southern California by way of Mexico in the early 1900s, working in Los Angeles inner-city missions. From 1952 to 1977, they operated the Theological Seminary of Claretville and the Immaculate Heart Claretian Novitiate on the former Gillette Estate, which they renamed Claretville. Thomas Aquinas College rented the Claretville campus from the Claretians from 1971 to 1978. When the Claretians sold their Claretville property in 1978 to Clare Prophet and her Church Universal and Triumphant, Thomas Aquinas College purchased, moved to, and began construction on a permanent campus in Santa Paula, California. At the present time, the Gillette Estate/Claretville property is now known as the King Gillette Ranch, at the intersection of Mulholland Highway and Las Virgenes Road in Calabasas. The land and historic structures by architect Wallace Neff are now part of Malibu Creek State Park.

Parks and recreation

Brandon's Village

Brandon’s Village is a universally accessible playground located at Gates Canyon Park in Calabasas. It serves over 5,000 special-needs children from Calabasas and surrounding communities. Designed by Shane's Inspiration, a nonprofit organization that designs and builds universally accessible playgrounds, Brandon’s Village is about 1 acre (4,000 m2) in size. Its playground equipment is over 70% independently playable by children with disabilities, and also provides meaningful and stimulating play opportunities for children without disabilities.

The Hindu Temple of Calabasas

The large Malibu Hindu Temple, located on Las Virgenes Road in Calabasas, is visited by many Hindus and others from both in and outside California. The Hindu Temple Society of Southern California was incorporated in the State of California as a nonprofit religious organization on August 18, 1977.

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