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CSKA Moscow
Club crest
Full name Профессиональный
футбольный клуб ЦСКА
Nickname(s) Koni (Horses)
Krasno-sinie (Red-blues)
Armeitsy (Army Men)
Founded 27 August 1911; 112 years ago (1911-08-27)
Ground VEB Arena
Ground Capacity 30,457
Owner VEB.RF
President Yevgeni Giner
Head coach Vladimir Fedotov
League Russian Premier League
2022–23 Russian Premier League, 2nd of 16

Professional Football Club CSKA (Russian: Профессиональный футбольный клуб – ЦСКА, derived from the historical name 'Центральный спортивный клуб армии', English: Central Sports Club of the Army), commonly referred to as CSKA Moscow or CSKA Moskva outside of Russia, or simply as CSKA (pronounced [tsɛ ɛs ˈka]), is a Russian professional football club. It is based in Moscow, playing its home matches at the 30,000-capacity VEB Arena. It plays in red and blue colours, with various plain and striped patterns having been used.

Founded in 1911, CSKA is one of the oldest football clubs in Russia and it had its most successful period after World War II with five titles in six seasons. It won a total of 7 Soviet Top League championships and 5 Soviet Cups, including the double in the last season in 1991. The club has also won 6 Russian Premier League titles as well as 8 Russian Cups.

CSKA Moscow became the first club in Russia to win one of the European cup competitions, the UEFA Cup, after defeating Sporting CP in the final in Lisbon in 2005.

CSKA was the official team of the Soviet Army during the communist era. Since the dissolution of the Soviet Union it has become privately owned. In 2012, the Ministry of Defence sold all of its shares (24,94%) to Bluecastle Enterprises Ltd, a conglomerate owning 100% of the club since then. On 13 December 2019, state-owned development corporation VEB.RF announced they will take control of over 75% of club shares that were used as collateral by previous owners for the VEB Arena financing. Russian businessman Roman Abramovich's Sibneft corporation was a leading sponsor of the club from 2004 to 2006.

After the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine, the European Club Association suspended the team, along with all Russian club and national teams, from participation in European competition. Due to the international sanctions the Governmental Investments Bank VEB.RF has sold the club to Trinfico Investments company.

History

Names

CSKA Moscow was founded in 1911 and, like many clubs in the former Soviet Union, has seen a number of name changes. From 1928 to 1950 the association was called CDKA Moscow (ЦДКА Москва). In 1951 its name was changed to CDSA Moscow (ЦДСА Москва). In 1957 the sports society was renamed again into CSK MO Moscow (ЦСК МО Москва). The current name of club's football department, PFC CSKA Moscow (ПФК ЦСКА Москва) has been used since 1994.

  • 1911–22: Amateur Society of Skiing Sports (OLLS Moscow) (Russian: Общество Любителей Лыжного Спорта)
  • 1923: Experimental & Demonstrational Playground of Military Education Association (OPPV) (Russian: Опытно-Показательная Площадка Всеобуча)
  • 1924–27: Experimental & Demonstrational Playground of Military Administration (OPPV) (Russian: Опытно-Показательная Площадка Военведа)
  • 1928–50: Sports Club of Central House of the Red Army (CDKA) (Russian: Спортивный Клуб Центрального Дома Красной Армии)
  • 1951–56: Sports Club of Central House of the Soviet Army (CDSA) (Russian: Спортивный Клуб Центрального Дома Советской Армии)
  • 1957–59: Central Sports Club of the Ministry of Defense (CSK MO) (Russian: Центральный Спортивный Клуб Министерства Обороны)
  • 1960–: Central Sports Club of Army (CSKA) (Russian: Центральный Спортивный Клуб Армии)

Foundation and first successes

The history of CSKA football club began in 1911, when a football section was organized in the Amateur Society of Skiing Sports (OLLS).

OPPV Moskva
OPPV emblem

After the 1917 season, part of the reserve OLLS team moved to the first. In 1921, the champion of the autumn Moscow championship (winner of Fulda Cup) was determined in the final match, in which teams OLLS and KFS took part. The KFS team won 6:0. In the 1922 season, OLLS players won the spring Moscow championship and took second place in the fall championship. In the same year, OLLS won KFS-Kolomyagi Cup, in the final of which, according to the regulations, the winners of the first and second leagues of the Moscow championship met, and Tosmen Cup, where the champions of Moscow and Petrograd met.

Soviet period

Until 1970: Peaks and troughs

The club had its most successful period immediately after the end of the Second World War. At this time, one of the best players in its history and the best scorer in the history of the team, Grigory Fedotov, played for the club. The army men were runners-up in the first edition of the resumed Vysschaya Liga in 1945.

CDKA Moskva
CDKA emblem

Three consecutive championship titles followed for the first time in league history, including club's first double in 1948. This year the army team won their second USSR Cup. In the semifinals, as a result of a replay, CDKA snatched victory from Dynamo Moscow, and in the final they defeated the current cup holders, Spartak. By that time the main army team became dubbed as the "Team of Lieutenants" (Russian: «Команда Лейтенантов»). After finishing second in 1949, in 1950, the army team became champions again, and in 1951, playing under the new name CDSA (Central House of the Soviet Army), they won a double again, winning both the championship and the cup. The history of the football department from this time is closely linked to the ice hockey department of the club, HC CSKA Moscow, because the leading players like Vsevolod Bobrov played both sports in parallel.

Arkadyev
Boris Arkadyev, CDKA coach

After successful times Olympic Games 1952 in Helsinki marked the beginning of the decline of CDSA Moscow. The club's players formed the core of the national team, which, after tough negotiations, joined FIFA shortly before the Olympic football tournament. Boris Arkadiev became the coach of both the national team and the army club. The first meeting between the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia in football is still amongst the most famous matches. On the political level, the Soviet leader Joseph Stalin and the Yugoslav leader Josip Tito split in 1948, which resulted in Yugoslavia being excluded from the Communist Information Bureau. Before the match, both Tito and Stalin sent telegrams to their national teams, which showed just how important it was for the two head of states. Yugoslavia led 5–1, but a Soviet comeback in the last 15 minutes resulted in a 5–5 draw. The match was replayed, Yugoslavia winning 3–1. The defeat to the archrivals hit Soviet football hard, especially CDSA and its players. After just three games played in the season, CDSA was forced to withdraw from the league and later disbanded. Furthermore, Boris Arkadiev was stripped of his Merited Master of Sports of the USSR title. For intelligence chief Lavrentiy Beria, the Olympic elimination was the perfect opportunity to eliminate the successful city rival. As head of the KGB, he was also honorary president of Dynamo Moscow - the main rival of CDSA.

Albert Shesternyov (1967)
Albert Shesternyov, one of the best Soviet players and CDSA captain

After two seasons of oblivion and after Stalin's death in the spring of 1953 CDSA Moscow was re-established in 1954 on the initiative of then Soviet Defense Minister Nikolai Bulganin. Shortly thereafter, the team won the Soviet Cup in 1955, defeating Dynamo Moscow in the final with the legendary goalkeeper Lev Yashin being sent off. The fans had to wait 15 years for the next trophy. In 1970 season, CSKA became Soviet champions for the sixth time, gaining the same number of points with Dynamo. The first gold match held on December 5, 1970 in Tashkent, Uzbek SSR ended without goals. The next day CSKA won the second match against Dynamo 4:3 after 1:3 deficit. By winning the championship, CSKA qualified for the first round of the European Cup. CSKA defeated Turkish club Galatasaray in the first round, but lost to Belgian champion Standard Liège in the second round and was eliminated from the tournament.

1971 to 1991: Two decades drought

With only 19 points out of a possible 68 in the 1984 season, the club had to endure the first ever relegation to the second division, where CSKA spent two seasons. After returning to the Higher league, the club did not manage to stay in it for a long time, and in the 1987 season, a second relegation followed. Nevertheless CSKA was able to fight its way back after two seasons in the First League, immediately secured the runner-up and even won the last edition of the football championship of the Soviet Union in the 1991 season. Having also won the Soviet cup, the club thus secured the last golden double in the history of the USSR football. With the championship title from the 1991 season, CSKA Moscow qualified for the first round of the 1992–93 UEFA Champions League, where they defeated the Icelandic team Víkingur Reykjavík. In the second round the Spanish top club Barcelona with coach Johan Cruyff was defeated. The opponents in Group A were the current Champions League winners Olympique Marseille, Glasgow Rangers and Club Brugge. CSKA was unable to build on the results of the matches with Barcelona, becoming the fourth in the group with two draws and four defeats, and was eliminated from the tournament.

Modern period

1992 to 2004: Back to the top

CSKA Moscow was one of the founding members of the newly formed Russian Top Division after the dissolution of the Soviet Union. In the first six seasons, the team occupied the places in the middle of the table. In the 1998 season, the club was runner-up and in the next season finished third. In the following two seasons, CSKA Moscow again occupied places in the middle of the table. In the 2002 season, the team trained by Valery Gazzaev took second place again, winning the Russian Cup. In 2003, the team won its first championship in the history of the Russian Premier League. After that, the head coach Valery Gassayev was sacked surprisingly and the Portuguese coach Artur Jorge was signed as his successor. Under the new coach, the team could not build on the performances from the previous season. After falling to fifth place in July 2004, Arthur Jorge was sacked after only eight months at the helm of the club. After the return of Valery Gassaev, CSKA was able to save the season and become vice-champion.

2005 to 2010: Golden years

Soccer Field Transparant.svg

Russia
A.Berezutski
Russia
Aldonin
Nigeria
Odiah
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Rahimić
The 2005 UEFA Cup Final starting lineup.

In the 2004 season, after qualifying for the UEFA Champions League, the team finished third at the group stage and therefore took part in the UEFA Cup play-off. The UEFA Cup for CSKA began with a home match against Portugal's Benfica in the round of 32, which ended in a 2-0 victory for CSKA, in the away match CSKA drew 1-1. The next rival of CSKA was the Serbian club Partizan, the away match in Belgrade ended with a score of 1-1, and the home match in Krasnodar - 2-0 in favor of the red-blue team. In the next round, the army team defeated the French side Auxerre 4-0. Despite the 2-0 away defeat, CSKA was able to continue playing in the UEFA Cup. In the semifinals, CSKA's opponent was the Italian side Parma, after beating which (0-0, 3-0), the Muscovites reached the final.

Gazzaev
Valery Gazzaev, coach during the golden era of the club

Then, on May 18, 2005, the team became the first Russian team ever to win a European competition, the 2004-05 UEFA Cup at the José Alvalade Stadium in Lisbon, Portugal, winning Sporting 3-1. The team failed to consolidate their success, losing the UEFA Super Cup to English club Liverpool on 26 August 2005 at Stade Louis II, in Monaco. Nevertheless, this year, CSKA become the first Russian club to complete a treble after winning the second Russian championship title and the Russian Cup.

The team had qualified for the third qualifying round of the 2006–07 UEFA Champions League by winning the championship in 2005 and progressed to the group stage over MFK Ružomberok. At the group stage, CSKA finished in third place and qualified for the round of 32 in the UEFA Cup, but was eliminated there against the Israeli representative Maccabi Haifa. In the 2006 season, CSKA won domestic treble, as the team won all three national titles: the Premier League, the Russian Cup and the Russian Super Cup.

As Russian champions, CSKA qualified for the 2007–08 UEFA Champions League. At the group stage, CSKA finished fourth and last with just one draw out of five defeats and was eliminated. In the Premier League, CSKA occupied the third place, but won the Russian Super Cup.

CSKA Russian Cup 2008
CSKA players celebrating their victory in the 2008 Russian Cup

In the first half of the 2008 season, CSKA played below expectations and even finished in seventh place at the break of the season. After the European Championship, Valery Gazzaev, who announced his retirement at the end of the season, switched the game tactics to four defenders and let the young Alan Dzagoev, who was considered one of the greatest talents in Russian football, show himself. As a result, CSKA ended its negative series and from then on showed effective football. But it was no longer enough to win the championship, and CSKA took the runner-up behind Rubin Kazan. In the 2008-09 UEFA Cup, CSKA was the only team to achieve twelve points from four group matches. Then the team advanced to the round of 16, where they were defeated by the eventual UEFA Cup winners Shakhtar Donetsk from Ukraine after a 1-0 home win and subsequent 0-2 away defeat. The team also won the Russian Cup for the fourth time.

Vágner Love with Russian Super Cup 2013
Vágner Love, club's legend

In January 2009, the Brazilian Zico took over the position of head coach at CSKA. After the half of the 2009 season, the club was only fourth. At the end of the 2009 season, fifth place was just enough for participation in the 2010-11 UEFA Europa League. As a result, the Brazilian head coach was dismissed in September 2009. In the same month, the Spaniard Juande Ramos was signed as his successor, but only lasted 47 days before being released on October 26 and replaced by Leonid Slutsky. The club won the Russian Supercup for the fourth time and became the Russian Cup winner for the fifth time. The team had also qualified for the quarter-finals of the Champions League for the first time after defeating Sevilla FC 3–2 on aggregate. They were later eliminated from competition by the eventual winners Inter Milan, losing by 1–0 scorelines in both Milan and Moscow.

Slutsky era

Leonid Slutsky was introduced as the new head coach in October 2009. In the 2010 Russian Premier League season, the team was runner-up. In the Russian Cup, the team was eliminated in the round of 32 against the second division Ural Ekaterinburg. In the Europa League, CSKA made it to the round of 16, where the team lost to the eventual winners Porto after two defeats (0-1 and 1-2).

Spar-csk (10)
Leonid Slutsky

Finishing as the runners-up in the previous season, the club qualified for the group stage of the 2011–12 UEFA Champions League. The opponents in Group B were Inter Milan, Trabzonspor and Lille. On 7 December 2011, CSKA qualified for the knockout phase after winning crucial 3 points by defeating Inter Milan with scoreline 1–2 in Milan and finishing as the runners-up in the group behind the Milanese. In the round of 16 the team met Spanish top club Real Madrid, to which CSKA lost 2-5 on aggregate. In the 2011–12 Russian championship, CSKA could only reach third place despite finishing second after the first phase of the season. By the 100th anniversary of the club, CSKA could not leave its fans without a trophy and won its sixth Russian Cup, beating Alania Vladikavkaz in the final 2-1 on May 22, 2011.

In the 2012–13 season, CSKA took part in the play-off round of the 2012–13 UEFA Europa League, where they were eliminated against Swedish side AIK after 1-0 in Moscow and 0-2 in Stockholm. At the end of the season, however, CSKA were crowned the champions of Russia. It was the eleventh championship title in club history. The team won the Russian Cup and thus achieving a double.

As Russian champions CSKA took part in the 2013–14 UEFA Champions League. The club was eliminated from the competition after the group stage against Bayern Munich, Manchester City and Viktoria Plzeň with only one win and five defeats resulting in the fourth place. In the domestic League, however, the club celebrated the second championship title in a row after Zoran Tošić scored the decisive goal against Lokomotiv Moscow on the last Matchday of the season for the tenth victory in the league in a row.

CSKA-MC (6)
CSKA Moscow team in 2014 against Manchester City at a UEFA Champions League match

In the 2015–16 season, CSKA advanced to the Champions League group stage over Sparta Prague and Sporting. With PSV Eindhoven, Manchester United and Wolfsburg, CSKA completed Group B of the competition, but wasn't able to advance to the round of 16. In the Premier League, the club started with six consecutive wins, with the first four games being won without conceding a single goal. At the end of the season, the army club finished two points ahead of the second-placed Rostov and won its sixth Russian title (and 13th overall).

As a result, CSKA took part in the group stage of the 2016–17 UEFA Champions League. Opponents in Group E were Monaco, Bayer Leverkusen and Tottenham Hotspur. On 6 October 2016, during the group stage, Finland announced that Roman Eremenko had been handed a 30-day ban from football by UEFA, with UEFA announcing on 18 November 2016, that Eremenko had been handed a two-year ban from football. Following the ban of one of the team leaders CSKA couldn't win a single game and was therefore eliminated from the tournament. After the last group game against Tottenham and after a negative run in the league, longtime head coach Leonid Slutsky left the club at his own request.

On 12 December, Viktor Goncharenko was announced as the club's new manager, signing a two-year contract.

Under Goncharenko

As CSKA finished second in the 2016–17 Premier League, they started their way in the 2017–18 UEFA Champions League from the third qualifying round, defeating AEK Athens there and then Young Boys in the play-off round. In Group A, the army club met Benfica, Manchester United and Basel and finished in third place. As a result, CSKA continued to play in the Europa League and advanced to the quarter-finals, losing to Arsenal.

Viktor Goncharenko
Viktor Goncharenko

On 21 July 2018, Goncharenko extended his contract until the end of the 2019/20 season. During the summer of 2018 CSKA lost many of its leaders: Aleksei and Vasili Berezutski and Sergei Ignashevich finished their careers as professional players; Alexandr Golovin was bought by AS Monaco; Pontus Wernbloom became a PAOK player and Bibras Natcho went to Olympiacos. However, at the start of that season CSKA showed good results, being at the top-three in Russian champions table and beating Real Madrid in Champions League group stage in both home and away matches (1–0 in Moscow and 3–0 in Madrid).

On 13 December 2019, state-owned development corporation VEB.RF announced they will take control of over 75% of club shares that were used as collateral by previous owners for the VEB Arena financing.

On 22 March 2021, Viktor Goncharenko left his role as head coach of CSKA Moscow by mutual consent.

Under Olić, Berezutski and Fedotov

On 23 March 2021, CSKA appointed their former striker Ivica Olić as their new head coach. After just nine games, culminating in a 6th place finish in the 2020–21 Russian Premier League, missing the European competitions for the first time in 20 years, Olić left CSKA by mutual consent on 15 June 2021 with Aleksei Berezutski being placed in temporary charge. On 19 July 2021, Berezutski was confirmed as CSKA's new permanent head coach.

In February 2022, CSKA were hit by sanctions from the United States Department of the Treasury as a consequence of the ongoing Russian invasion of Ukraine. CSKA is owned by Russian state-controlled VEB and was sanctioned as its asset. In addition, the European Club Association suspended the team. CSKA won season-best 6 consecutive league games (last two before the winter break and the first four after), Berezutski was selected league's coach of the month for March 2022 and the club moved up to the 3rd position in the standings within 6 points of league-leading Zenit Saint Petersburg. However, CSKA won only twice in the remaining 8 games of the league season and finished in 5th place. On 15 June 2022, Berezutski left his role as Head Coach after his contract was terminated by mutual agreement, with Vladimir Fedotov being appointed as the clubs new Head Coach the same day. Fedotov led CSKA to the 2nd place in the 2022–23 Russian Premier League. CSKA also won the 2022–23 Russian Cup.

Stadium

Arena CSKA
VEB Arena

CSKA had its own stadium called "Light-Athletic Football Complex CSKA" and abbreviated as LFK CSKA. Its capacity is very small for a club of its stature; no more than 4,600 spectators.

Between 1961 and 2000, CSKA played their home games at the Grigory Fedotov Stadium. In 2007, the Grigory Fedotov Stadium was demolished in 2007, and ground was broken on the club's new stadium Arena CSKA later the same year. During construction of their new stadium, CSKA played the majority of their games at the Arena Khimki and Luzhniki Stadium. After several delays in its construction, Arena CSKA was official opened on 10 September 2016.

On 28 February 2017, CSKA Moscow announced that they had sold the naming rights to the stadium to VEB, with the stadium becoming the VEB Arena.

In 2018, CSKA decided to play its home UEFA Champions League matches at Luzhniki Stadium, instead of VEB Arena.

Honours

Domestic

  • Soviet Top League / Russian Premier League (First-tier)
    • Winners (13): 1946, 1947, 1948, 1950, 1951, 1970, 1991, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2015–16
    • Runners-up (13): 1938, 1945, 1949, 1990, 1998, 2002, 2004, 2008, 2010, 2014–15, 2016–17, 2017–18, 2022–23
  • Soviet First League / Russian National Football League (Second-tier)
    • Winners: 1986, 1989
    • Runners-up: 1985
  • Soviet Cup / Russian Cup
    • Winners (13): 1945, 1948, 1951, 1955, 1990–91, 2001–02, 2004–05, 2005–06, 2007–08, 2008–09, 2010–11, 2012–13, 2022–23
    • Runners-up (7): 1944, 1966–67, 1991–92, 1992–93, 1993–94, 1999–2000, 2015–16
  • Soviet Super Cup / Russian Super Cup
    • Winners (7) – (record): 2004, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2013, 2014, 2018
    • Runners-up (5): 2003, 2010, 2011, 2016, 2023
  • All-Union CPCS Tournament / USSR Federation Cup / Russian Premier League Cup
    • Winners: 1952

European

Non-official

  • Trofeo Villa de Gijón: 1
1994
  • Channel One Cup: 1
2007
2010
  • La Manga Cup: 1
2013

League and Cup history

Soviet Union

Season League Soviet Cup Europe Other Top scorer Head Coach
Division Pos P W D L F A Pts Competition Result Competition Result Name Goals
1936(s) 1st 4 6 2 1 3 13 18 11 - - - Evgeny Shelagin 3 Soviet Union Pavel Khalkiopov
1936(a) 1st 8 7 2 0 5 9 20 11 R32 - - Ivan Mitronov
Nikolai Isaev
2 Soviet Union Pavel Khalkiopov
1937 1st 9 16 3 1 12 18 43 23 SF - - Mikhail Kireev 5 Soviet Union Mikhail Rushchinsky
1938 1st 2 25 17 3 5 52 24 37 R64 - - Soviet Union Grigory Fedotov 20 Soviet Union Konstantin Zhiboedov
1939 1st 3 26 14 4 8 68 43 32 QF - - Soviet Union Grigory Fedotov 21 Soviet Union Konstantin Zhiboedov
1940 1st 4 24 10 9 5 46 35 29 - - - Soviet Union Grigory Fedotov 21 Soviet Union Sergei Bukhteev
1941 - - - - - - - - - - - - Soviet Union Sergei Bukhteev
1942 - - - - - - - - - - - -
1943 - - - - - - - - - - - -
1944 - - - - - - - - - Runner-Up - - Soviet Union Evgeny Nikishin
Soviet Union Boris Arkadyev
1945 1st 2 22 18 3 1 69 23 39 Winner - - Soviet Union Vsevolod Bobrov 24 Soviet Union Boris Arkadyev
1946 1st 1 22 17 3 2 55 13 37 QF - - Soviet Union Valentin Nikolayev 16 Soviet Union Boris Arkadyev
1947 1st 1 24 17 6 1 61 16 40 SF - - Soviet Union Valentin Nikolayev
Soviet Union Vsevolod Bobrov
14 Soviet Union Boris Arkadyev
1948 1st 1 26 19 3 4 82 30 41 Winner - - Soviet Union Vsevolod Bobrov 23 Soviet Union Boris Arkadyev
1949 1st 2 34 22 7 5 86 30 51 SF - - Soviet Union Grigory Fedotov 18 Soviet Union Boris Arkadyev
1950 1st 1 36 20 13 3 91 31 53 SF - - Boris Koverznev 21 Soviet Union Boris Arkadyev
1951 1st 1 28 18 7 3 53 19 43 Winner - - Soviet Union Alexei Grinin
Soviet Union Vyacheslav Solovyov
10 Soviet Union Boris Arkadyev
1952 - - - - - - - - - - - LC Winner Soviet Union Boris Arkadyev
1953 - - - - - - - - - - - -
1954 1st 6 24 8 8 8 30 29 24 QF - - Viktor Fyodorov 6 Soviet Union Grigory Pinaichev
1955 1st 3 22 12 7 3 35 20 31 Winner - - Valentin Yemyshev
Yuri Belyaev
8 Soviet Union Grigory Pinaichev
1956 1st 3 22 10 5 7 40 32 25 - - - Yuri Belyaev 15 Soviet Union Grigory Pinaichev
1957 1st 5 22 12 2 8 51 31 27 SF - - Soviet Union Vasily Buzunov 16 Soviet Union Grigory Pinaichev
1958 1st 3 22 9 9 4 40 25 27 R16 - - Soviet Union German Apukhtin 10 Soviet Union Boris Arkadyev
1959 1st 9 22 8 3 11 29 27 19 - - - Soviet Union German Apukhtin 9 Soviet Union Boris Arkadyev
1960 1st 6 30 15 2 13 45 35 32 R16 - - Vladimir Streshniy 12 Soviet Union Grigory Pinaichev
1961 1st 4 30 16 6 8 61 43 38 R64 - - Soviet Union Alexei Mamykin 18 Soviet Union Konstantin Beskov
1962 1st 4 32 14 12 6 39 22 40 R32 - - Soviet Union Vladimir Fedotov 6 Soviet Union Konstantin Beskov
1963 1st 7 38 14 17 7 39 27 45 R32 - - Soviet Union Vladimir Fedotov 8 Soviet Union Vyacheslav Solovyov
1964 1st 3 32 16 11 5 49 23 43 QF - - Soviet Union Vladimir Fedotov 16 Soviet Union Vyacheslav Solovyov
Soviet Union Valentin Nikolayev
1965 1st 3 32 14 10 8 38 24 38 R16 - - Boris Kazakov 15 Soviet Union Valentin Nikolayev
1966 1st 5 36 16 9 11 60 45 41 R32 - - Boris Kazakov 15 Soviet Union Sergei Shaposhnikov
1967 1st 9 36 12 12 12 35 35 36 Runner-Up - - Taras Shulyatitsky 6 Soviet Union Sergei Shaposhnikov
Soviet Union Alexei Kalinin
Soviet Union Vsevolod Bobrov
1968 1st 4 38 20 10 8 50 30 50 R16 - - Soviet Union Vladimir Polikarpov 10 Soviet Union Vsevolod Bobrov
1969 1st 6 32 13 11 8 25 18 37 SF - - Berador Abduraimov 7 Soviet Union Vsevolod Bobrov
1970 1st 1 32 20 5 7 46 17 45 R16 - - Soviet Union Boris Kopeikin 15 Soviet Union Valentin Nikolayev
1971 1st 12 30 7 12 11 34 36 26 R16 EC R2 - Soviet Union Boris Kopeikin 8 Soviet Union Valentin Nikolayev
1972 1st 5 30 15 4 11 37 33 34 SF - - Soviet Union Vladimir Polikarpov
Vladimir Dorofeev
Wilhelm Tellinger
6 Soviet Union Valentin Nikolayev
1973 1st 10 30 10 9 11 33 36 25 QF - - Vladimir Dorofeev 9 Soviet Union Valentin Nikolayev
1974 1st 13 30 7 12 11 28 33 26 R16 - - Soviet Union Vladimir Fedotov
Yuri Smirnov
5 Soviet Union Vladimir Agapov
1975 1st 13 30 6 13 11 29 36 25 SF - - Soviet Union Boris Kopeikin 13 Soviet Union Anatoly Tarasov
1976(s) 1st 7 15 5 5 5 20 16 15 - - - Soviet Union Boris Kopeikin 6 Soviet Union Alexei Mamykin
1976(a) 1st 7 15 5 5 5 21 16 15 QF - - Soviet Union Boris Kopeikin 8 Soviet Union Alexei Mamykin
1977 1st 14 30 5 17 8 28 39 27 R16 - - Soviet Union Yuri Chesnokov 12 Soviet Union Alexei Mamykin
Soviet Union Vsevolod Bobrov
1978 1st 6 30 14 4 12 36 40 32 R16 - - Aleksei Belenkov 8 Soviet Union Vsevolod Bobrov
1979 1st 8 34 12 8 14 46 46 32 SF - - Soviet Union Yuri Chesnokov 16 Soviet Union Sergei Shaposhnikov
1980 1st 5 34 13 12 9 36 32 36 R16 - - Soviet Union Alexandr Tarkhanov 14 Soviet Union Oleg Bazilevich
1981 1st 6 34 14 9 11 39 33 37 R16 UC R1 - Soviet Union Yuri Chesnokov 9 Soviet Union Oleg Bazilevich
1982 1st 15 34 10 9 15 41 46 29 Qualifying - - Soviet Union Alexandr Tarkhanov 16 Soviet Union Oleg Bazilevich
Soviet Union Albert Shesternev
1983 1st 12 34 11 12 11 37 33 32 SF - - Viktor Kolyadko 13 Soviet Union Albert Shesternev
1984 1st 18 34 5 9 20 24 55 19 QF - - Gennady Shtromberger 4 Soviet Union Yury Morozov
1985 2nd 2 42 21 14 7 81 37 56 QF - - Soviet Union Valeri Shmarov 29 Soviet Union Yury Morozov
1986 2nd 1 47 27 9 11 65 35 63 R32 - - Sergei Berezin 19 Soviet Union Yury Morozov
1987 1st 15 30 7 11 12 26 35 24 Winner - - Soviet Union Vladimir Tatarchuk Soviet Union Yury Morozov
1988 2nd 3 42 23 10 9 69 35 56 Winner - - Soviet Union Valery Masalitin 16 Soviet Union Sergei Shaposhnikov
1989 2nd 1 42 27 10 5 113 28 64 R128 - - Soviet Union Valery Masalitin 32 Soviet Union Pavel Sadyrin
1990 1st 2 24 13 5 6 43 26 31 SF - - Soviet Union Valery Masalitin / Soviet Union Igor Korneev 8 Soviet Union Pavel Sadyrin
1991 1st 1 30 17 9 4 57 32 43 Winner CWC R1 - Soviet Union Dmitri Kuznetsov 12 Soviet Union Pavel Sadyrin
1992 - - - - - - - - - Runner-Up - - Soviet Union Pavel Sadyrin

Russia

Season League Russian Cup Europe Other Top scorer Head Coach
Division Pos P W D L F A Pts Competition Result Competition Result Name Goals
1992 Top League 5 26 13 7 6 46 29 33 Runner-Up CL GS - Russia Alexandr Grishin 10 Russia Pavel Sadyrin
Russia Gennadi Kostylev
1993 Top League 9 34 12 6 16 43 45 42 Runner-Up - - Russia Ilshat Fayzulin
Russia Oleg Sergeyev
8 Russia Gennadi Kostylev
Russia Boris Kopeikin
1994 Top League 10 30 8 10 12 30 32 26 Round of 16 CWC 1R - Russia Ilshat Fayzulin
Russia Oleg Sergeyev
5 Russia Boris Kopeikin
Russia Alexandr Tarkhanov
1995 Top League 6 30 16 5 9 56 34 53 Quarter-finals - - Russia Dmitry Karsakov 10 Russia Alexandr Tarkhanov
1996 Top League 5 34 20 6 8 58 35 66 Round of 16 UC 1R - Russia Dmitry Khokhlov
Russia Aleksei Gerasimov
10 Russia Alexandr Tarkhanov
1997 Top League 12 34 11 9 14 31 42 42 Quarter-finals - - Russia Vladimir Kulik 9 Russia Pavel Sadyrin
1998 Top Division 2 30 17 5 8 50 22 56 Semi-finals - - Russia Vladimir Kulik 14 Russia Pavel Sadyrin
Russia Oleg Dolmatov
1999 Top Division 3 30 15 10 5 56 29 55 Runner-Up CL 2QR - Russia Vladimir Kulik 14 Russia Oleg Dolmatov
2000 Top Division 8 30 12 5 13 45 39 41 Round of 16 UC 1R - Russia Vladimir Kulik 10 Russia Oleg Dolmatov
Russia Pavel Sadyrin
2001 Top Division 7 30 12 11 7 39 30 47 Winner - - Serbia Predrag Ranđelović 8 Russia Pavel Sadyrin
Russia Aleksandr Kuznetsov
2002 Premier League 2 30 21 3 6 60 27 66 Round of 32 UC 1R - Russia Rolan Gusev
Russia Dmitry Kirichenko
15 Russia Valery Gazzaev
2003 Premier League 1 30 17 8 5 56 32 59 Quarter-finals CL 2QR RSC Runner-Up Russia Rolan Gusev 9 Russia Valery Gazzaev
2004 Premier League 2 30 17 9 4 53 22 60 Winner CL GS RSC Winner Croatia Ivica Olić
Brazil Vágner Love
Russia Dmitry Kirichenko
9 Portugal Artur Jorge
Russia Valery Gazzaev
2005 Premier League 1 30 18 8 4 48 20 62 Winner UC
UC
Winner

GS
USC Runner-up Croatia Ivica Olić 10 Russia Valery Gazzaev
2006 Premier League 1 30 17 7 6 47 28 58 Round of 16 CL GS RSC Winner Brazil 14 Russia Valery Gazzaev
2007 Premier League 3 30 14 11 5 43 24 53 Winner UC
CL
R32
GS
RSC Winner Brazil
Brazil Vágner Love
13 Russia Valery Gazzaev
2008 Premier League 2 30 16 8 6 53 24 56 Winner UC R16 - Brazil Vágner Love 20 Russia Valery Gazzaev
2009 Premier League 5 30 16 4 10 48 30 52 Round of 32 CL QF RSC Winner Serbia Miloš Krasić
Czech Republic Tomáš Necid
9 Brazil Zico
Spain Juande Ramos
Russia Leonid Slutsky
2010 Premier League 2 30 18 8 4 51 22 59 Winner EL R16 RSC Runner-up Brazil Vágner Love 9 Russia Leonid Slutsky
2011–12 Premier League 3 44 19 9 16 72 47 73 Round of 32 CL R16 RSC Runner-up Ivory Coast Seydou Doumbia 28 Russia Leonid Slutsky
2012–13 Premier League 1 30 20 4 6 49 25 64 Winner EL PO - Nigeria Ahmed Musa 11 Russia Leonid Slutsky
2013–14 Premier League 1 30 20 4 6 49 26 64 Semi-finals CL GS RSC Winner Ivory Coast Seydou Doumbia 18 Russia Leonid Slutsky
2014–15 Premier League 2 30 19 3 8 67 27 60 Semi-finals CL GS RSC Winner Finland Roman Eremenko 13 Russia Leonid Slutsky
2015–16 Premier League 1 30 20 5 5 51 25 65 Runner-Up CL GS - Nigeria Ahmed Musa 13 Russia Leonid Slutsky
2016–17 Premier League 2 30 18 8 4 47 15 62 Round of 32 CL GS RSC Runner-up Russia Fyodor Chalov
Israel Bibras Natcho
Brazil Vitinho
6 Russia Leonid Slutsky
Belarus Viktor Goncharenko
2017–18 Premier League 2 30 17 7 6 49 23 58 Round of 32 CL
EL
GS
QF
- Brazil Vitinho 10 Belarus Viktor Goncharenko
2018–19 Premier League 4 30 14 9 7 46 23 51 Round of 32 CL GS RSC Winner Russia Fyodor Chalov 15 Belarus Viktor Goncharenko
2019–20 Premier League 4 30 14 8 8 43 29 50 Quarter-finals EL GS - Croatia Nikola Vlašić 12 Belarus Viktor Goncharenko
2020–21 Premier League 6 30 15 5 10 51 33 50 Semi-finals EL GS - Croatia Nikola Vlašić 11 Belarus Viktor Goncharenko
Croatia Ivica Olić

CSKA in European football

By competition

Competition P W D L GS GA %W
European Cup / UEFA Champions League &&&&&&&&&&&&0104.&&&&&0104 &&&&&&&&&&&&&034.&&&&&034 &&&&&&&&&&&&&024.&&&&&024 &&&&&&&&&&&&&046.&&&&&046 &&&&&&&&&&&&0125.&&&&&0125 &&&&&&&&&&&&0155.&&&&&0155 &&&&&&&&&&&&&032.69000032.69
UEFA Cup / UEFA Europa League &&&&&&&&&&&&&069.&&&&&069 &&&&&&&&&&&&&031.&&&&&031 &&&&&&&&&&&&&018.&&&&&018 &&&&&&&&&&&&&020.&&&&&020 &&&&&&&&&&&&&097.&&&&&097 &&&&&&&&&&&&&067.&&&&&067 &&&&&&&&&&&&&044.93000044.93
Cup Winners' Cup &&&&&&&&&&&&&&04.&&&&&04 &&&&&&&&&&&&&&02.&&&&&02 &&&&&&&&&&&&&&00.&&&&&00 &&&&&&&&&&&&&&02.&&&&&02 &&&&&&&&&&&&&&05.&&&&&05 &&&&&&&&&&&&&&05.&&&&&05 &&&&&&&&&&&&&050.&&&&&050.00
UEFA Super Cup &&&&&&&&&&&&&&01.&&&&&01 &&&&&&&&&&&&&&00.&&&&&00 &&&&&&&&&&&&&&00.&&&&&00 &&&&&&&&&&&&&&01.&&&&&01 &&&&&&&&&&&&&&01.&&&&&01 &&&&&&&&&&&&&&03.&&&&&03 &0&&&&&&&&&&&&&&00.&&&&&00.00
Total &&&&&&&&&&&&0178.&&&&&0178 &&&&&&&&&&&&&067.&&&&&067 &&&&&&&&&&&&&042.&&&&&042 &&&&&&&&&&&&&069.&&&&&069 &&&&&&&&&&&&0228.&&&&&0228 &&&&&&&&&&&&0230.&&&&&0230 &&&&&&&&&&&&&037.64000037.64

UEFA club coefficient ranking

. Source: UEFA Coefficients

Rank Team Points
183 Denmark Randers 7.000
184 Cyprus Anorthosis 7.000
185 Russia CSKA Moscow 7.000
186 Turkey Adana Demirspor 2.500
187 Turkey Konyaspor 2.000

Football Club Elo ranking

Rank Team Points
132 England Coventry City 1570
133 Germany Hertha Berlin 1570
134 Russia CSKA Moscow 1570
135 France Toulouse 1569
136 Germany Heidenheim 1568

Players

Current squad

No. Position Player
2 Brazil DF Khellven
4 Brazil DF Willyan Rocha
5 Serbia MF Saša Zdjelar
6 Russia MF Maksim Mukhin
7 Chile FW Víctor Dávila
9 Russia FW Fyodor Chalov
10 Russia MF Ivan Oblyakov
11 Russia FW Tamerlan Musayev
14 Russia DF Kirill Nababkin (vice-captain)
17 Russia MF Kirill Glebov
19 Algeria MF Sid Ahmed Aissaoui
21 Uzbekistan MF Abbosbek Fayzullaev
No. Position Player
22 Serbia DF Milan Gajić
27 Brazil DF Moisés
31 Russia MF Matvey Kislyak
35 Russia GK Igor Akinfeev (captain)
49 Russia GK Vladislav Torop
68 Russia DF Mikhail Ryadno
77 Russia DF Ilya Agapov
78 Russia DF Igor Diveyev
86 Russia GK Vladimir Shaykhutdinov
88 Chile MF Víctor Méndez
90 Russia DF Matvey Lukin
91 Russia FW Anton Zabolotny

Out on loan

No. Position Player
Russia GK Danila Bokov (at Chayka Peschanokopskoye until 30 June 2024)
Russia GK Ilya Pomazun (at Ural Yekaterinburg until 30 June 2024)
Brazil DF Bruno Fuchs (at Atlético Mineiro until 31 December 2024)
Russia DF Vadim Karpov (at Ufa until 30 June 2024)
Russia DF Vadim Konyukhov (at Akron Tolyatti until 30 June 2024)
Russia DF Yegor Noskov (at Volga Ulyanovsk until 30 June 2024)
Russia DF Andrei Savinov (at SKA-Khabarovsk until 30 June 2024)
Croatia MF Kristijan Bistrović (at Baltika Kaliningrad until 30 June 2024)
No. Position Player
Russia MF Makar Pestov (at Akron Tolyatti until 30 June 2024)
Russia MF Yegor Ushakov (at Krylia Sovetov Samara until 30 June 2024)
Russia MF Nikita Yermakov (at Pari Nizhny Novgorod until 30 June 2024)
Argentina FW Adolfo Gaich (at Çaykur Rizespor until 30 June 2024)
Nigeria FW Chidera Ejuke (at Royal Antwerp until 30 June 2024)
Belarus FW Ilya Shkurin (at Stal Mielec until 30 June 2024)
Russia FW Vladislav Yakovlev (at Khimki until 30 June 2024)

Retired numbers

  • 12 – Club supporters (the 12th man)
  • 16 – Ukraine Serhiy Perkhun, goalkeeper (2001) – posthumous honor

Notable players

Had international caps for their respective countries. Players whose name is listed in bold represented their countries while playing for CSKA.

USSR/Russia
  • Soviet Union Yuri Adzhem
  • Soviet Union Valentin Afonin
  • Soviet Union German Apukhtin
  • Soviet Union Vladimir Astapovsky
  • Soviet Union Anatoli Bashashkin
  • Soviet Union Yozhef Betsa
  • Soviet Union Vsevolod Bobrov
  • Soviet Union Valentin Bubukin
  • Soviet Union Vyacheslav Chanov
  • Soviet Union Yuri Chesnokov
  • Soviet Union Sergey Dmitriyev
  • Soviet Union Sergei Fokin
  • Soviet Union Yuri Istomin
  • Soviet Union Vladimir Kaplichny
  • Soviet Union Vagiz Khidiyatullin
  • Soviet Union Anatoly Krutikov
  • Soviet Union Nikolai Manoshin
  • Soviet Union Valentin Nikolayev
  • Soviet Union Valeri Novikov
  • Soviet Union Yuri Nyrkov
  • Soviet Union Mikhail Perevalov
  • Soviet Union Aleksandr Petrov
  • Soviet Union Viktor Ponedelnik
  • Soviet Union Igor Ponomaryov
  • Soviet Union Anatoli Porkhunov
  • Soviet Union Boris Razinsky
  • Soviet Union Viktor Samokhin
  • Soviet Union Albert Shesternyov
  • Soviet Union Valeri Shmarov
  • Soviet Union Andriy Sidelnikov
  • Soviet Union Aleksandr Tarkhanov
  • Soviet Union Viktor Yanushevsky
  • Soviet Union Georgi Yartsev
  • Soviet Union Mikhail Yeryomin
  • Soviet Union Viktor Zvyagintsev
  • Soviet Union Commonwealth of Independent States Russia Dmitri Galiamin
  • Soviet Union Commonwealth of Independent States Russia Andrei Ivanov
  • Soviet Union Commonwealth of Independent States Russia Dmitri Kharine
  • Soviet Union Commonwealth of Independent States Russia Igor Korneev
  • Soviet Union Commonwealth of Independent States Russia Dmitri Kuznetsov
  • Soviet Union Commonwealth of Independent States Russia Oleg Sergeyev
  • Soviet Union Russia Andrei Mokh
  • Soviet Union Russia Vladimir Tatarchuk
  • Soviet Union Turkmenistan Valeri Broshin
  • Commonwealth of Independent States Sergey Shustikov
  • Commonwealth of Independent States Russia Valeri Karpin
  • Commonwealth of Independent States Russia Andrey Pyatnitsky
  • Russia Andrei Afanasyev
  • Russia Ilzat Akhmetov
  • Russia Igor Akinfeev
  • Russia Yevgeni Aldonin
  • Russia Aleksei Berezutski
  • Russia Vasili Berezutski
  • Russia Maksim Bokov
  • Russia Yevgeni Bushmanov
  • Russia Fyodor Chalov
  • Russia Nikita Chernov
  • Russia Vyacheslav Dayev
  • Russia Igor Diveyev
  • Russia Alan Dzagoev
  • Russia Soslan Dzhanayev
  • Russia Ilshat Fayzulin
  • Russia Sergei Filippenkov
  • Russia Vladimir Gabulov
  • Russia Aleksandr Golovin
  • Russia Rolan Gusev
  • Russia Sergei Ignashevich
  • Russia Aleksei Ionov
  • Russia Vyacheslav Karavayev
  • Russia Dmitri Khokhlov
  • Russia Dmitri Kirichenko
  • Russia Sergei Kolotovkin
  • Russia Oleg Kornaukhov
  • Russia Konstantin Kuchayev
  • Russia Alan Kusov
  • Russia Pavel Mamayev
  • Russia Veniamin Mandrykin
  • Russia Valeri Minko
  • Russia Maksim Mukhin
  • Russia Kirill Nababkin
  • Russia Ruslan Nigmatullin
  • Russia Andrei Novosadov
  • Russia Ivan Oblyakov
  • Russia Kirill Panchenko
  • Russia Ilya Pomazun
  • Russia Denis Popov
  • Russia Vladislav Radimov
  • Russia Sergei Semak
  • Russia Igor Semshov
  • Russia Dmitri Sennikov
  • Russia Georgi Shchennikov
  • Russia Roman Shirokov
  • Russia Andrei Solomatin
  • Russia Yevgeni Varlamov
  • Russia Viktor Vasin
  • Russia Oleg Veretennikov
  • Russia Renat Yanbayev
  • Russia Igor Yanovsky
  • Russia Dmitri Yefremov
  • Russia Denis Yevsikov
  • Russia Anton Zabolotny
  • Russia Yuri Zhirkov
Former USSR countries
  • Armenia Andrey Movsisyan
  • Armenia Nair Tiknizyan
  • Azerbaijan Deni Gaisumov
  • Azerbaijan Vagif Javadov
  • Azerbaijan Dmitriy Kramarenko
  • Belarus Vyacheslav Geraschenko
  • Belarus Vadim Skripchenko
  • Kazakhstan Baktiyar Zaynutdinov
  • Latvia Aleksandrs Cauņa
  • Latvia Juris Laizāns
  • Lithuania Valdas Ivanauskas
  • Lithuania Edgaras Jankauskas
  • Lithuania Deividas Šemberas
  • Moldova Oleg Șișchin
  • Tajikistan Valeri Sarychev
  • Turkmenistan Dmitri Khomukha
  • Ukraine Serhiy Perkhun
  • Ukraine Bohdan Shershun
  • Ukraine Dmytro Tyapushkin
  • Uzbekistan Vitaliy Denisov
  • Uzbekistan Abbosbek Fayzullaev
  • Uzbekistan Alexander Geynrikh
Europe
South America
Africa
Asia

Club officials

Administration Coaching staff (senior team) Coaching staff (U-21 team)
  • President – Russia Yevgeni Giner
  • General director – Russia Roman Babayev
  • Executive director – Russia Dmitry Egorov
  • Commercial director – Russia Andrey Zarubyan
  • Manager – Russia Vladimir Fedotov
  • Assistant manager – Russia Oleg Fomenko
  • Assistant manager – Russia Murat Iskakov
  • Assistant manager – Russia Radik Yamlikhanov
  • Fitness coach – Wales Ryland Morgans
  • Goalkeeping coach – Azerbaijan Dmitry Kramarenko
  • Analyst coach – Russia Evgeny Shevelev
  • Manager – Russia Andrey Aksenov
  • Assistant manager – Russia Yuri Adzhem
  • Assistant manager – Russia Maksim Bokov
  • Fitness coach – Russia Igor Aksyonov

Coaching history

Nationality Name From To Duration P W D L Win %
 Soviet Union Pavel Khalkiopov 1936 1936
 Soviet Union Mikhail Rushchinsky 1937 1939
 Soviet Union Sergey Bukhteyev 1940 1941
 Soviet Union Pyotr Yezhov 1941 1941
 Soviet Union Yevgeni Nikishin 1942 1944
 Soviet Union Boris Arkadyev 1944 1952
 Soviet Union Grigori Pinaichev 1954 1957
 Soviet Union Boris Arkadyev 1958 1959
 Soviet Union Grigori Pinaichev 1959 1960
 Soviet Union Konstantin Beskov 1961 1962
 Soviet Union Vyacheslav Solovyov 1963 1964
 Soviet Union Valentin Nikolayev 1964 1965
 Soviet Union Sergei Shaposhnikov 1966 1967
 Soviet Union Vsevolod Bobrov 1967 1969
 Soviet Union Valentin Nikolayev 1970 1973
 Soviet Union Vladimir Agapov 1973 1974
 Soviet Union Anatoly Tarasov 1975 1975
 Soviet Union Aleksei Mamykin 1976 1977
 Soviet Union Vsevolod Bobrov 1977 1978
 Soviet Union Sergei Shaposhnikov 1979 1979
 Soviet Union Oleh Bazylevych 1980 1982
 Soviet Union Albert Shesternyov 1982 1983
 Soviet Union Sergei Shaposhnikov 1983 1983
 Soviet Union Yury Morozov 1984 1987
 Soviet Union Sergei Shaposhnikov 1987 1988
 Soviet Union
 Russia
Pavel Sadyrin 1989 1992
 Russia Gennadi Kostylev 1992 1993
 Russia Boris Kopeykin 1993 1994
 Russia Aleksandr Tarkhanov 5 July 1994 23 January 1997 2 years, 202 days 91 47 18 26 51.65
 Russia Pavel Sadyrin 23 January 1997 2 July 1998 1 year, 160 days 54 16 16 22 29.63
 Russia Oleg Dolmatov 2 July 1998 29 May 2000 1 year, 332 days 65 39 12 15 60
 Russia Pavel Sadyrin 1 July 2000 2 October 2001 1 year, 93 days 24 12 3 9 50
 Russia Valery Gazzaev 2 October 2001 24 November 2003 2 years, 53 days 80 48 14 18 60
 Portugal Artur Jorge 24 November 2003 12 July 2004 231 days 20 9 7 4 45
 Russia Valery Gazzaev 12 July 2004 22 November 2008 4 years, 133 days 213 119 52 42 55.87
 Brazil Zico 9 January 2009 10 September 2009 244 days 28 14 5 9 50
 Spain Juande Ramos 10 September 2009 26 October 2009 46 days 9 4 1 4 44.44
 Russia Leonid Slutsky 26 October 2009 7 December 2016 7 years, 42 days 287 160 57 70 55.75
 Belarus Viktor Goncharenko 12 December 2016 22 March 2021 4 years, 100 days 183 92 40 51 50.27
 Croatia Ivica Olić 23 March 2021 15 June 2021 84 days 9 4 1 4 44.44
 Russia Aleksei Berezutski 15 June 2021 15 June 2022 1 year, 0 days 34 18 5 11 52.94
 Russia Vladimir Fedotov 15 June 2022 Present 1 year, 311 days 2 2 0 0 100

Ownerships, kit suppliers and shirt sponsors

Period Kit manufacturers Shirt sponsor Owners
1980—1990 Adidas None Soviet MOD and then Russian MOD
through CSKA Moscow society
1991—1994 Umbro
1995—1996 Nike
1997—1999 Adidas
2000—2003 Umbro Bluecastle Enterprises Ltd. (Yevgeni Giner)
2004 Konti
2004—2005 Sibneft
2006—2008 VTB Bank
2009 Reebok Aeroflot
2010—2012 Bashneft
2012—2013 Adidas Aeroflot
2013—2018 Rosseti
2018—2020 Umbro
2020—2023 Joma ICS Holding VEB.RF
2023—present Gold'n Apotheka

Supporters and rivalries

PFC CSKA Moscow supporters
CSKA Moscow fans

CSKA Moscow fans maintain good relations with the fans of Serbian Partizan, Greek PAOK FC, Bulgarian CSKA Sofia, Polish Widzew Łódź and fellow Russian fans of Dynamo Moscow. The Club's main rival is Spartak Moscow.

Nickname

CSKA was nicknamed Horses because the first stadium was built on the old racecourse/hippodromo in Moscow. It was considered offensive, but later it was transformed into The Horses, and currently this nickname is used by players and fans as the name, along with other variants such as Army Men (Russian: армейцы) and Red-Blues (Russian: красно-синие).

Famous fans

  • Alexander Babakov
  • Matvey Blanter
  • Aleksey Buldakov
  • Igor Butman
  • Semyon Farada
  • Oleg Gazmanov
  • Andrei Grechko
  • Sergei Ivanov
  • Konstantin Kinchev
  • Leonid Kuravlyov
  • Otar Kushanashvili
  • Denis Lebedev
  • Yegor Letov
  • Oleg Menshikov
  • Aleksey Merinov
  • Maya Plisetskaya
  • Aleksandr Porokhovshchikov
  • Natalya Seleznyova
  • Maksim Shevchenko
  • Mikhail Tanich
  • Natalya Varley
  • Vladimir Vysotsky
  • Sergei Yastrzhembsky
  • Mikhail Youzhny
  • Vladimir Zeldin

Club records

Appearances

Igor Akinfeev 2018
Igor Akinfeev with the most appearances for CSKA at 751
Name Years League Cup Europe Other1 Total
1 Russia Igor Akinfeev 2003–present 558 (0) 53 (0) 132 (0) 14 (0) 757 (0)
2 Russia Sergei Ignashevich 2004–2018 381 (35) 39 (6) 111 (5) 9 (0) 540 (46)
3 Russia Vasili Berezutski 2002–2018 376 (9) 40 (0) 105 (4) 10 (0) 531 (13)
4 Russia Aleksei Berezutski 2001–2018 341 (8) 46 (0) 106 (3) 9 (0) 502 (11)
5 Soviet Union Vladimir Fedotov 1960–1975 382 (92) 42 (8) 3 (0) 0 (0) 427 (100)
6 Russia Alan Dzagoev 2008–2022 282 (55) 32 (5) 78 (17) 5 (0) 397 (77)
7 Soviet Union Vladimir Polikarpov 1962–1974 341 (75) 38 (8) 4 (0) 0 (0) 383 (83)
9 Russia Georgi Shchennikov 2008–2023 257 (6) 23 (1) 74 (3) 7 (0) 367 (10)
8 Lithuania Deividas Šemberas 2002–2012 254 (1) 37 (0) 70 (0) 6 (1) 367 (2)
10 Bosnia and Herzegovina Elvir Rahimić 2001–2014 240 (6) 36 (0) 64 (0) 7 (0) 347 (6)
11 Soviet Union Dmitri Bagrich 1958–1970 313 (1) 18 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 331 (1)
12 Soviet UnionCommonwealth of Independent StatesRussia Dmitri Galiamin 1981–1991 299 (3) 29 (3) 2 (0) 0 (0) 330 (6)
13 Russia Sergei Semak 1994–2004 282 (68) 25 (9) 21 (6) 1 (0) 329 (84)
14 Russia Mario Fernandes 2012–2022 259 (9) 19 (2) 48 (0) 3 (0) 329 (11)
15 Soviet Union Volodymyr Kaplychnyi 1966–1975 288 (5) 35 (1) 4 (0) 0 (0) 327 (6)
16 Soviet UnionCommonwealth of Independent StatesRussia Dmitri Kuznetsov 1984–1991, 1992, 1997–1998 292 (49) 29 (5) 2 (0) 0 (0) 323 (54)
17 Russia Kirill Nababkin 2009–present 235 (4) 39 (0) 43 (1) 5 (0) 322 (5)
18 Russia Evgeni Aldonin 2004–2013 213 (6) 31 (5) 66 (2) 5 (0) 315 (13)
19 Soviet Union Albert Shesternyov 1959–1972 278 (1) 23 (0) 4 (0) 0 (0) 305 (1)
20 Soviet Union Aleksey Grinin 1939–1952 246 (82) 34 (18) 0 (0) 13 (4) 293 (104)

1Includes Russian Super Cup, Russian Premier League Cup and UEFA Super Cup.

Top goalscorers

Vágner Love 2007
Vagner Love scored 124 goals in 259 games during his CSKA career
Name Years League Cup Europe Other1 Total
1 Soviet Union Grigory Fedotov 1938–1949 128 (160) 10 (18) 0 (0) 18 (23) 161 (196)
2 Brazil Vágner Love 2004–2011, 2013 85 (169) 8 (27) 30 (57) 1 (6) 124 (259)
3 Soviet Union Valentin Nikolayev 1940–1952 81 (201) 23 (36) 0 (0) 14 (16) 118 (253)
4 Soviet Union Aleksey Grinin 1939-1952 82 (246) 18 (34) 0 (0) 4 (13) 104 (293)
5 Soviet Union Vsevolod Bobrov 1945–1949 84 (79) 18 (20) 0 (0) 0 (0) 102 (99)
6 Soviet Union Vladimir Fedotov 1960–1975 92 (382) 8 (42) 0 (3) 0 (0) 100 (427)
7 Soviet Union Vladimir Dyomin 1941-1952, 1954 80 (195) 15 (35) 0 (0) 3 (8) 98 (238)
8 Ivory Coast Seydou Doumbia 2010–2014, 2015 66 (108) 5 (11) 23 (30) 1 (1) 95 (150)
9 Soviet Union Boris Kopeikin 1969-1977 71 (223) 21 (37) 2 (4) 0 (0) 94 (264)
10 Soviet Union Yuri Chesnokov 1975–1983 72 (252) 14 (35) 1 (2) 0 (0) 87 (289)
11 Russia Fyodor Chalov 2016–present 72 (186) 8 (28) 4 (30) 0 (2) 84 (246)
11 Russia Sergei Semak 1994–2004 68 (282) 9 (25) 6 (21) 0 (1) 84 (329)
13 Soviet Union Vladimir Polikarpov 1962-1974 75 (341) 8 (38) 0 (4) 0 (0) 83 (383)
14 Russia Valeri Masalitin 1987–1989, 1990–1992, 1993 73 (134) 5 (20) 0 (2) 0 (0) 78 (156)
15 Russia Alan Dzagoev 2008–2022 55 (282) 5 (32) 17 (78) 0 (5) 77 (397)
16 Soviet Union Aleksandr Tarkhanov 1976–1984 61 (249) 10 (33) 1 (2) 0 (0) 72 (284)
17 Russia Vladimir Kulik 1997–2001 49 (140) 14 (18) 0 (4) - (-) 63 (162)
18 Nigeria Ahmed Musa 2012–2016, 2018 48 (135) 6 (15) 7 (32) 0 (2) 61 (184)
19 Soviet UnionCommonwealth of Independent StatesRussia Igor Korneev 1985–1991 48 (144) 9 (20) 0 (2) 0 (0) 57 (166)
20 Soviet UnionCommonwealth of Independent StatesRussia Dmitri Kuznetsov 1984–1991, 1992, 1997–1998 49 (292) 5 (29) 0 (2) 0 (0) 54 (323)

1Includes Russian Super Cup, Russian Premier League Cup and UEFA Super Cup.

CSKA Women

CSKA's women's football team was founded in 1990 and competed in Soviet Championship's second level. Following the dissolution of the Soviet Union that same year, it registered in the Russian Supreme Division, where it competed for two seasons before it folded.

Following the disbanding of Zorky Krasnogorsk near the end of the 2015 Top Division, FK Rossiyanka filled its vacancy for the next season and the new team was registered as CSKA in the 2016 championship. Its first game, a 1–1 draw against Chertanovo, coincided with the 93rd anniversary of the CSKA's first football match. CSKA ended the championship second-to-last, while Rossiyanka won its fifth title.

In July 2017, during the inter-season summer pause, it became a CSKA official section. Two months later the team won its first title after defeating Chertanovo 1–0 in the Russian Cup final.

In recent years CSKA Women won two Russian championships in a row, in 2019 and 2020 and made their debut in UEFA Women's Champions League.

FC CSKA-d Moscow and FC CSKA-2 Moscow

The reserves team played on the professional level as FC CSKA-d Moscow (Russian Second League in 1992–93, Russian Third League in 1994–97, Russian Second Division in 1998–00, in 1998–00 team was called FC CSKA-2 Moscow). A separate farm club called FC CSKA-2 Moscow played in the Soviet Second League in 1986–89, Soviet Second League B in 1990–91, Russian Second League in 1992–93 and Russian Third League in 1994. That latter team was called FC Chaika-CSKA-2 Moscow for one season in 1989.

See also

Kids robot.svg In Spanish: PFC CSKA Moscú para niños

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PFC CSKA Moscow Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.