Derby, Connecticut facts for kids

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Derby, Connecticut
City
Annual fireworks display from the Derby-Shelton Bridge
Annual fireworks display from the Derby-Shelton Bridge
Official seal of Derby, Connecticut
Seal
Motto: "Connecticut's Smallest City"
Location in New Haven County, Connecticut
Location in New Haven County, Connecticut
Country United States
State Connecticut
NECTA Bridgeport-Stamford
Region The Valley
Named 1675
Incorporated (town) 1775
Incorporated (city) 1893
Area
 • Total 5.4 sq mi (14.0 km2)
 • Land 5.0 sq mi (12.9 km2)
 • Water 0.4 sq mi (1.0 km2)
Elevation 102 ft (31 m)
Population (2012)
 • Total 12,830
 • Density 2,376/sq mi (916/km2)
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
ZIP code 06418
Area code(s) 203
FIPS code 09-19480
GNIS feature ID 0206671
Website www.derbyct.gov

Derby is a city in New Haven County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 12,903 at the 2010 census.

History

Derby CT
Derby, ca. 1910

Derby was settled in 1642 as an Indian trading post under the name Paugasset. It was named after Derby, England, in 1675.

Derby was incorporated on May 13, 1775.

In the 19th century, both corsets and hoop skirts were manufactured in the city.

In 1872, the Derby Silver Company began production. In 1898, the company became a division of the International Silver Company headquartered in Meriden, CT, but continued making silver with its brand name until 1933.

Charlton Comics, a comic book publishing company that existed from 1944 to 1986, was based in town.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 5.4 square miles (8.7 km2), of which, 5.0 square miles (13 km2) of it is land and 0.4 square miles (1.0 km2) of it (7.41%) is water. The city is home to the 1.4 square kilometres (350 acres) Osbornedale State Park. Derby is divided into two main sections by the Naugatuck River: East Derby and Derby Center (Birmingham). The center of Derby is approximately 66 miles (106 km) from New York City.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 2,103
1880 3,026 43.9%
1890 4,413 45.8%
1900 7,930 79.7%
1910 8,991 13.4%
1920 11,238 25.0%
1930 10,788 −4.0%
1940 10,287 −4.6%
1950 10,259 −0.3%
1960 12,132 18.3%
1970 12,599 3.8%
1980 12,346 −2.0%
1990 12,199 −1.2%
2000 12,391 1.6%
2010 12,902 4.1%
Est. 2015 12,700 −1.6%
U.S. Decennial Census
See also: List of Connecticut locations by per capita income

As of the census of 2000, there were 12,391 people, 5,252 households, and 3,245 families residing in the town. The population density was 2,487.6 people per square mile (960.7/km2). There were 5,568 housing units at an average density of 1,117.8 per square mile (431.7/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 90.08% White, 3.62% Black or African American, 0.16% Native American, 1.74% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 2.52% from other races, and 1.82% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.67% of the population.

There were 5,252 households out of which 27.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.1% were married couples living together, 13.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.2% were non-families. 32.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.94.

In the town the population was spread out with 21.7% under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 33.0% from 25 to 44, 21.5% from 45 to 64, and 16.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 93.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.0 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $45,670, and the median income for a family was $54,715. Males had a median income of $42,367 versus $30,458 for females. The per capita income for the town was $23,117. About 6.9% of families and 8.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.1% of those under age 18 and 7.8% of those age 65 or over.

Voter registration and party enrollment as of October 25, 2005
Party Active voters Inactive voters Total voters Percentage
Democratic 2,834 42 2,876 42.11%
Republican 931 93 1,024 14.99%
Unaffiliated 2,802 121 2,923 42.80%
Minor Parties 7 0 7 0.10%
Total 6,574 256 6,830 100%

Polish immigration

Polish immigrants have left a large mark on the demographics of the town, with 18% of all residents claiming Polish as their ethnicity and 2% as having been born in Poland. Due to this large population, the town features several Polish shops, restaurants, and clubs. Saint Michael's the Archangel Parish, a Roman Catholic church serves mass in Polish as well as English.

Arts and culture

Derby sites on the National Register of Historic Places

Historical
population
of Derby
1756 1,000
1774 1,889
1782 2,218
1790 2,994
1800 1,878
1810 2,051
1820 2,088
1830 2,253
1840 2,851
1850 3,824
1860 5,443
1870 8,020
1880 11,650
1890 5,969
1900 7,930
1910 8,991
1920 11,238
1930 10,788
1940 10,287
1950 10,259
1960 12,132
1970 12,599
1980 12,346
1990 12,199
2000 12,391
2010 12,902
  • The Kraus Corset Factory, now the Sterling Rowe Apartment House on the corner of Roosevelt Drive and Third Street.
  • Osbornedale, a farm house built in the early nineteenth century.
  • Howe House, built in 1845.
  • Sterling Opera House was built in 1889 to seat 1250, and remained in use until 1945. City Hall and a police station occupied the two lower levels until 1965.
  • Derby Public Library, built in 1902 with Ansonia marble, the library was founded as a free reading room in 1868. The land was provided by the Sarah Riggs Humphreys Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, on the condition that the building would always have a room the chapter could use. The chapter also donated $5,000 for books with the stipulation that people in the town raise an equal amount.
  • Birmingham Green Historic District was designated on April 21, 2000, as Derby's sixth site on the National Register of Historic Places.

Landmark

National Humane Alliance Fountain - Derby, CT
This is the National Humane Alliance fountain given to Derby, CT in 1906 and restored in 2007 as a gateway to the Derby Greenway. The fountain has three levels. The top level contains spigots in the shape of lion's heads for humans. Below that is a large circular bowl for horses and at the base are smaller bowls for dogs and cats.

The city has resurrected its National Humane Alliance fountain – a century-old granite structure with lion-head spigots—as part of a gateway entrance plaza at the Division Street entrance to the Derby Greenway. The fountain was given to the City in 1906 by the National Humane Alliance and erected at the intersection of Seymour and Atwater Avenues. The water was first turned on on June 1, 1906. Years later it was moved to Founders Commons when traffic patterns made its original location a problem. It fell into disrepair and was not used as a fountain while on Founders Commons. When the Derby Greenway was built, the fountain was moved to its new location on June 22, 2006, fully restored with new plumbing and new lions heads and formally dedicated with the surrounding Derby Hall of Fame Plaza on September 1, 2007.

Plans for the future

The Howe House "will become home of the Lower Naugatuck Valley Industrial Heritage Center; where the Derby Historical Society's extensive collection of Industrial Era artifacts will be properly displayed. Future educational programs will include student hands-on programs that will introduce the Industrial Revolution and the Valley's active role in this period."


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