kids encyclopedia robot

Pokémon World Championships facts for kids

Kids Encyclopedia Facts
Quick facts for kids
Pokémon World Championships
[[File:Pokémon World Championships logo.jpg|]]
Founded 2004 (2004)
Commissioner Tsunekazu Ishihara
Official website Play! Pokémon Events

The Pokémon World Championships is an invite-only esports event organized by The Pokemon Company. It is held annually in August and features games from the Pokémon series such as the Pokémon video games, Pokémon Trading Card Game, Pokkén Tournament and Pokémon Go. Players earn invitations to the World Championships based on their performance in qualifiers and other tournaments held throughout the season and compete for scholarship money, prizes and the title of World Champion. With the exception of Asia, invitations to the World Championships are administered by the Play! Pokémon program.

Qualification

The qualifying process for the Pokémon World Championships varies each year and is dependent on a player's age division and the country in which they are located in. Players may also qualify to play on different days of the World Championships based on their performance in their respective qualifying programs; the best performing players will immediately advance to the second day of the World Championships playoffs (i.e. "Day 2") instead of playing through the first day (i.e. "Day 1").

Play! Pokémon program

See also: Play! Pokémon#List of participating countries

Players located in a country with a Play! Pokémon program (i.e. in North America, Europe, Latin America and Oceania) compete in a regular schedule of tournaments for Championship Points and receive invitations when they meet a predetermined threshold of points at the end of the season.

In 2015, the Play! Pokemon program expanded to include countries from the continents of Latin America and Asia (except Japan and South Korea). However, on June 10, 2020, it was announced that Asia would no longer be part of the Play! Pokémon program and will have its own qualifying system towards the Pokémon World Championships.

Japan & South Korea

Tournaments in Japan and South Korea are organized independently from Play! Pokémon and as such, players from these countries have a different system of qualification.

In Japan, players compete for an invite to the Japan National Championships by playing in major qualifier or online tournaments held throughout the season. The best performing players of the Japan National Championships will then be selected to represent Japan in the Pokémon World Championships.

In South Korea, the style of qualification for the World Championships changes frequently. For example in 2015, players would compete in the Korean National Championships and earn a World Championships invitation based on their standing in the tournament. However in 2019, players would compete in tournaments organized by the Korean League and earn an invite based on the number of points they had accumulated by the end of the season.

Other

There are other less common methods of qualifying for the World Championships which include finishing at least top 4 or better in the prior year's World Championships or by participating in a single-elimination tournament known as the Last Chance Qualifier at the location of the World Championships itself.

List of World Champions

Trading Card Game (TCG)

Year Juniors Seniors Masters Ref.
2004 Japan Hayato Sato Japan Takuya Yoneda Japan Tsuguyoshi Yamato
2005 United States Curran Hill United States Stuart Benson United States Jeremy Maron
2006 Japan Hiroki Yano Finland Miska Saari United States Jason Klaczynski
2007 Japan Jun Hasebe United States Jeremy Scharff-Kim Finland Tom Roos
2008 United States Tristan Robinson United States Dylan Lefavour United States Jason Klaczynski
2009 Japan Tsubasa Nakamura Japan Takuto Itagaki United States Stephen Silvestro
2010 Japan Yuka Furusawa Canada Jacob Lesage Japan Yuta Komatsuda
2011 Brazil Gustavo Wada Australia Christopher Kan United States David Cohen
2012 Japan Shuto Itagaki Canada Chase Moloney Portugal Igor Costa
2013 Czech Republic Ondrej Kujal Australia Kaiwen Cabbabe United States Jason Klaczynski
2014 Japan Haruto Kobayashi United States Trent Orndorff Canada Andrew Estrada
2015 Canada Rowan Stavenow United States Patrick Martinez United States Jacob Van Wagner
2016 Japan Shunto Sadahiro Denmark Jesper Eriksen Japan Shintaro Ito
2017 Norway Tobias Strømdahl United States Zachary Bokhari Argentina Diego Cassiraga
2018 Japan Naohito Inoue Denmark Magnus Pederson Germany Robin Schulz
2019 Japan Haruki Miyamoto Germany Kaya Lichtleitner Australia Henry Brand

Video Game Championships (VGC)

Year Juniors Seniors Masters
2009 United States Jeremiah Fan Japan Kazuyuki Tsuji N/A
2010 Japan Shota Yamamoto United States Ray Rizzo N/A
2011 United States Brian Hough United States Kamran Jahadi United States Ray Rizzo
2012 United States Abram Burrows United States Toler Webb United States Ray Rizzo
2013 United States Brendan Zheng United States Hayden McTavish Italy Arash Ommati
2014 Japan Kota Yamamoto United States Nikolai Zielinski South Korea Sejun Park
2015 Japan Kotone Yasue United Kingdom Mark McQuillan Japan Shoma Honami
2016 United States Cory Connor United States Carson Confer United States Wolfe Glick
2017 Australia Nicholas Kan South Korea Hong Juyoung Japan Ryota Otsubo
2018 Japan Wonn Lee United States James Evans Ecuador Paul Ruiz
2019 Republic of China Pi Wu Japan Ko Tsukide Japan Naoto Mizobuchi

Pokkén Tournament

Year Seniors Masters
2016 United States Woomy!gun Japan Potetin
2017 N/A Japan Tonosuma
2018 Japan Kato United States ThankSwalot
2019 United States Ashgreninja1 Japan Subatan

2014 World Championships

2014 Pokémon World Championships
2014
Pokémon World Championships 2014.jpg
Attendees of the 2014 World Championships
Tournament information
Location Washington, D.C.
Dates August 13–15
Administrator(s) Play! Pokémon
Tournament
format(s)
Swiss rounds, knock-out finals
Venue(s) Walter E. Washington Convention Center
Participants 155
Purse US$5,000 in scholarships
Final positions
Champions South Korea Se Jun Park (Masters) United States Nikolai Zielinski (Seniors) Japan Kota Yamamoto (Juniors)
Runner-up United States Jeudy Azzarelli (Masters) United Kingdom Mark Mcquillan (Seniors) United States London Swan (Juniors)
Tournament statistics
Matches played 481 matches in 3 divisions
Attendance 3,000
← 2013
2015 →

The 2014 Pokémon World Championships was the sixth annual edition of the championships. The event took place in the Walter E. Washington Convention Center on Washington D.C. alongside the 2014 Pokémon Trading Card Game World Championship who were in their eleventh edition.

The tournament was streamed via Twitch for the first time in the tournament history and reached a viewership of more than 800,000.

The defending Video Game champions were Arash Ommati from Italy (Masters Division), Hayden McTavish from the United States (Senior Division), and Brendan Zheng from the United States (Junior Division). The opening ceremony of the event was attended by Junichi Masuda, the video game designer for the Pokémon franchise and a member of the board of directors of Game Freak.

2014 qualification

The qualification process for the 2014 Pokémon World Championships was primarily based on Championship Points accumulated by players from official Play! Pokémon tournaments such as Premier Challenges, Regional Championships and National Championships. In addition, the top 4 players of the 2013 Pokémon World Championships in each division, and the top 4 players of a tournament known as the 'Last Chance Qualifier' will also receive an invitation to play in the World Championships.

The invitations for the Masters Division of the tournament were distributed in the following manner:

  • Top 4 players from the 2013 Pokémon World Championships,
  • Top 32 players from Europe with the most Championship Points,
  • Top 16 players from North America with the most Championship Points,
  • Top 4 players from Australia with the most Championship Points,
  • Top 2 players from South Africa with the most Championship Points,
  • Top 8 players from the Japan National Championships,
  • Top 2 players from the South Korea National Championships, and
  • Top 4 players from the Last Chance Qualifier, a tournament held the day before the World Championships in the same venue.

Most of the invitations didn't include a fully paid trip to the tournament, and as a result several players could not attend the tournament.

2014 tournament structure

Players per country

  • Masters Division
Country Zone # of Players
 United States North America 22
 Germany Europe 10
 United Kingdom Europe 7
 Japan Japan 7
 Australia Australia 4
 Italy Europe 3
 Spain Europe 2
 South Korea South Korea 2
 South Africa South Africa 1
 Canada North America 1
 Ireland Europe 1

Results

Six rounds of Swiss was played by 60 players in the tournament, and each round was played with a set of best-of-three matches. The top 8 players after the Swiss rounds advances to the best-of-three Single Elimination matches.

The defending World Champion Arash Ommati and former three-time World Champion Ray Rizzo did not advance to the single elimination rounds.

  • Masters Division
 
                           
  1  Japan Ryosuke Kosuge 1  
8  Germany Markus Liu 2  
  8  Germany Markus Liu 0  
  5  United States Jeudy Azzarelli 2  
5  United States Jeudy Azzarelli 2
  4  United Kingdom Lee Provost 0  
    5  United States Jeudy Azzarelli 0
  6  South Korea Sejun Park 2
  3  Spain Miguel Marti de la Torre 0  
6  South Korea Sejun Park 2  
  6  South Korea Sejun Park 2
  2  United States Collin Heier 0  
7  Australia Dayne O'Meara 0
  2  United States Collin Heier 2  

Final standings

Place Masters Division Senior Division Junior Division
1st South Korea Se Jun Park United States Nikolai Zielinski Japan Kota Yamamoto
2nd United States Jeudy Azzarelli United Kingdom Mark Mcquillan United States London Swan
3rd United States Collin Heier Spain Eric Rios Japan Haruka Narita
4th Germany Markus Liu United States Ian McLaughlin Japan Riku Miyoshi

2015 World Championships

2015 Pokémon World Championships
2015
Tournament information
Location Boston, Massachusetts
Dates August 21–23
Administrator(s) Play! Pokémon
Tournament
format(s)
Swiss rounds, knock-out finals
Venue Hynes Convention Center
Purse $500,000 in scholarships
Final positions
Champions Japan Shoma Honami (Masters)
United Kingdom Mark McQuillan (Seniors)
Japan Kotone Yasue (Juniors)
Runner-up Japan Hideyuki Taida (Masters)
Japan Koki Honda (Seniors)
South Korea Ryan Jaehyun Park (Juniors)
← 2014
2016 →

The 2015 Pokémon World Championships was the seventh annual edition of the championships. The event was held alongside the Pokémon Trading Card Game World Championships at the Hynes Convention Center in Boston, Massachusetts.

The tournament was transmitted with live streaming from the official Pokémon Twitch channel. The defending Video Game champions for the year were Se Jun Park from South Korea (Masters Division), Nikolai Zielinsky from the United States (Senior Division) and Kota Yamamoto from Japan (Junior Division).

2015 qualification

Players could only gain an invitation to play in the Video Game World Championships by either being the 2014 Pokémon World Champions, or by obtaining enough Championship Points in their respective geographic zone designated by Play! Pokémon. However, the only exception to this rule are for players from Japan and South Korea, as their tournaments are not overseen by Play! Pokémon and their invites are governed through a different system of qualification.

Since 2014, players were able to earn Championship Points from various tournaments within their geographical region. The tournaments vary in scale, ranging from local Premier Challenges to state-level Regional Championships and finally the large-scale National Championships. The number of points awarded varies with scale, and players who earn these points are ranked and divided into zones such as North America, Europe and South Africa. This year, two new zones (Latin America and Asia-Pacific) were introduced.

The 2015 Pokémon Video Game World Championship was intended to be played under 2 Swiss tournaments and 1 single-elimination tournament which would then determine the 2015 World Champions. As such, there are two types of invites:

  • a regular 'Day One' invite, and
  • a 'Day Two' invite, which allows players to receive a bye for the Swiss tournament on the first day.

As an example, the invitations for the Masters Division were distributed as follows:-:

  • 'Day One' invitation (by Championship Points):
  • 'Day Two' invitation (i.e. 'Day One' bye)
    • 2014 World Champion
    • Top 8 players from North America by Championship Points.
    • Top 16 players from Europe by Championship Points.
    • Top 2 players from Latin America by Championship Points.
    • Top 2 players from Asia-Pacific by Championship Points.
    • Top 2 players from South Africa by Championship Points.
    • Top 4 players of the South Korea Video Game National Championships.
    • Top 8 players of the Japan Video Game National Championships.

2015 tournament structure

The Video Game Championships consisted of 2 Swiss tournaments and 1 single elimination tournament played across three days.

On Friday (Day 1), all players who earned an invitation without a Day 1 bye were entered into a Swiss tournament, where players with two or fewer losses would advance onto the next round. The second Swiss tournament was then played on Saturday (Day 2), where players who advanced from Day 1 were joined by players who received an invitation with a Day 1 bye.

At the end of the Day 2 Swiss tournament, the top eight players played in single elimination rounds until the last two remain. The finals took place on Sunday (Day 3).

Final standings (Video Game Championships)

Place Junior Division Senior Division Masters Division
1st Japan Kotone Yasue United Kingdom Mark Mcquillan Japan Shoma Honami
2nd South Korea Ryan Jaehyun Park Japan Koki Honda Japan Hideyuki Taida
3rd Japan Shu Harsaki Austria Max Marjanovic Japan Yosuke Isagi
4th Japan Shuhei Tsukano United States Kylie Chua Japan Naohito Mizobuchi

2016 World Championships

2016 Pokémon World Championships
2016
Tournament information
Location San Francisco, California
Dates August 19–21
Administrator(s) Play! Pokémon
Tournament
format(s)
Swiss rounds, knock-out finals
Venue San Francisco Marriott Marquis
Purse $500,000
Final positions
Champions United States Wolfe Glick (VGC Masters)
United States Carson Confer (VGC Seniors)
United States Cory Connor (VGC Juniors)
Japan Shintaro Ito (TCG Masters)
Denmark Jesper Eriksen (TCG Seniors)
Japan Shunto Sadahiro (TCG Juniors)
Runner-up United States Jonathan Evans (VGC Masters)
Japan Yuki Wata (VGC Seniors)
Japan Shu Harasaki (VGC Juniors)
United States Cody Walinski (TCG Masters)
United States Connor Pederson (TCG Seniors)
Japan Riku Ushirosako (TCG Juniors)
← 2015
2017 →

The 2016 Pokémon World Championships was the eighth annual edition of the championships. The event was held at the San Francisco Marriott Marquis in San Francisco, California from August 19 to August 21. For the first time in the tournament history, the Pokkén Tournament invitational was featured alongside the Video Game Championships (VGC) and Trading Card Game (TCG) tournaments. Side events and an official store with event merchandise occurred alongside the event.

The defending Video Game champions were Shoma Honami from Japan (Masters Division), Mark McQuillan from the United Kingdom (Senior Division) and Kotone Yasue from Japan (Junior Division). The defending Trading Card Game champions were Jacob Van Wagner from the United States (Masters Division), Patrick Martinez from the United States (Senior Division), and Rowan Stavenow from Canada.

Age divisions and qualifications

Both the Pokémon VGC and TCG were divided into three age divisions: the Junior Division (born 2005 or later), the Senior Division (born between 2001 and 2004), and the Masters Division (born 2000 or earlier). For the Pokkén Tournament invitational, players were grouped into either the Senior Division (born 2001 or later) or Masters Division (born 2000 or earlier).

The process of obtaining an invitation is primarily based on Championship Points. Players could earn Championship Points by performing in select online and live tournaments held throughout the 2016 season (between September 2015 and July 2016). Players from Japan and South Korea were excluded from this rule as these countries had their own method of qualification not based on Championship Points.

Play! Pokémon divided players into five different rating zones: US and Canada, Europe, Latin America, Asia-Pacific and South Africa. Different zones had different Championship Points requirements due to the distribution of events around the world.

There are two possible invitations players could obtain:

  • a regular 'Day One' invite, and
  • a 'Day Two' invite, which allowed players to acquire a 'Day One' bye and automatically enter the second Swiss tournament.

'Day Two' invites were usually accompanied by travel awards and stipends paid by Play! Pokémon.

Trading Card Game Championship qualifications

The following table shows the Championship Points requirement for an invitation to the 2016 World Championships:

Zones Masters Division Senior Division Junior Division Day Two (Ranking)
US and Canada 300 CP 250 CP 200 CP Top 16 Players in each division
Europe 300 CP 250 CP 200 CP Top 22 Players in each division
Latin America 200 CP 150 CP 100 CP Top 8 Players in each division
Asia-Pacific 200 CP 150 CP 100 CP Top 8 Players in each division
South Africa 200 CP 150 CP 100 CP None

Players in Japan and South Korea were awarded invitations based on each country's organized play system.

Video Game Championship qualifications

For the Masters Division, the following table lists the Championship Points requirement for an invitation to the 2016 World Championships:

Zones Day One Day Two (Ranking)
US and Canada 350 CP Top 8 of the Zone
Europe 275 CP Top 16 of the Zone
Latin America 150 CP Top 4 of the Zone
Asia-Pacific 200 CP Top 4 of the Zone
South Africa 400 CP None

2016 tournament structure

The Video Game Championships consisted of two Swiss tournaments and one single elimination tournament played across three days.

On Friday (Day 1), all players who earned an invitation without a Day 1 bye were entered into a Swiss tournament, where players with two or fewer losses would advance onto the next round. The second Swiss tournament was then played on Saturday (Day 2), where players who advanced from Day 1 were joined by players who received an invitation with a Day 1 bye.

At the end of the Day 2 Swiss tournament, players with two or fewer losses advanced to play in single elimination rounds until the last two remain. The finals took place on Sunday (Day 3).

Final standings (Video Game Championships)

Place Junior Division Senior Division Masters Division
1st United States Cory Connor United States Carson Confer United States Wolfe Glick
2nd Japan Shu Harasaki Japan Yuki Wata United States Jonathan Evans
3rd Japan Rikuto Noda United States Mostafa Afr Germany Markus Stadter
4th United States Enzo Reci Japan Kazuki Ogushi Portugal Eduardo Cunha

Final standings (Trading Card Game)

Place Junior Division Senior Division Masters Division
1st Japan Shunto Sadahiro Denmark Jesper Eriksen Japan Shintaro Ito
2nd Japan Riku Ushirosako United States Connor Pedersen United States Cody Walinski
3rd United States Roan Godfrey-Robbins Indonesia Rafli Attar United States Samuel Hough
4th Japan Yuta Ozawa Brazil Raphael Souto United States Ross Cawthon
kids search engine
Pokémon World Championships Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.