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RB Leipzig
RB Leipzig 2014 logo.svg
Full name RasenBallsport Leipzig e.V.
Nickname(s) Die Roten Bullen (The Red Bulls)
Short name RBL
Founded 19 May 2009; 14 years ago (2009-05-19)
Ground Red Bull Arena
Ground Capacity 47,069
Owner Red Bull GmbH (99%) (of GmbH)
Chairman Johann Plenge
Sporting director Rouven Schröder
Coach Marco Rose
League Bundesliga
2020–21 Bundesliga, 2nd of 18

RasenBallsport Leipzig e.V. (lit. Lawn Ball Sports Leipzig), commonly known as RB Leipzig, Red Bull Leipzig, or simply Leipzig, is a German professional football club based in Leipzig, Saxony. The club was founded in 2009 by the initiative of the company Red Bull GmbH, which purchased the playing rights of fifth-tier side SSV Markranstädt with the intent of advancing the new club to the top-flight Bundesliga within eight years. The men's professional football club is run by the spin-off organization RasenBallsport Leipzig GmbH. RB Leipzig plays its home matches at the Red Bull Arena. The club nickname is Die Roten Bullen (English: The Red Bulls).

History

Beginnings

In its inaugural season in 2009–10, RB dominated the NOFV-Oberliga Süd (V) and was promoted as champions to the Regionalliga Nord (IV). RB Leipzig won the 2012–13 Regionalliga Nordost season without a single defeat and was promoted to the 3. Liga (III), then finished the 2013–14 3. Liga season as runners-up and was promoted to the 2. Bundesliga (II) as the first team since the introduction of the 3. Liga to win promotion after only one season. On 12 May 2016, RB Leipzig along with SC Freiburg ensured promotion to the Bundesliga for the 2016–17 season with a 2–0 win over Karlsruher SC.

2016–present: Bundesliga era

20191002 Fußball, Männer, UEFA Champions League, RB Leipzig - Olympique Lyonnais by Stepro StP 0042-2
RB Leipzig in the UEFA Champions League

RB Leipzig earned a place in the UEFA Champions League for the first time by finishing as runners-up in the 2016–17 Bundesliga. They reached the semi-finals of the 2019–20 UEFA Champions League, losing to Paris Saint-Germain of France. On 21 May 2022, they won their first major title, the DFB-Pokal, against SC Freiburg. They would win a second consecutive title the following season, this time defeating Eintracht Frankfurt.

RB Leipzig's entrance into the upper echelons of German football has proven controversial, as the club's heavy corporate influence is regarded by many Germans to be antithetical to the traditional ownership, structure and management of sports clubs in Germany. On the other hand, some have expressed appreciation for what they view as an honourable endeavour to establish a durable footprint for the Bundesliga in the former German Democratic Republic, which previously had been at best tenuous since German reunification.

Colours and crest

2020-03-10 Fußball, Männer, UEFA Champions League Achtelfinale, RB Leipzig - Tottenham Hotspur 1DX 3861 by Stepro
2020 season kit featuring club's forward Timo Werner

RB Leipzig play in the traditional red and white colours of Red Bull football teams. All crests proposed at the club's founding were rejected by the Saxony Football Association (SFV), as they were considered copies of the corporate logo of Red Bull GmbH. The team therefore played its inaugural season in 2009–10 without a crest. RB Leipzig later proposed a new crest, which was eventually accepted by the SFV in May 2010. The crest was slightly different from the crests used by other Red Bull football teams. The two bulls had been altered in shape and a few strokes added. The crest was used from the 2010–11 Regionalliga season until the end of the 2013–14 3. Liga season. It was however rejected by the German Football League (DFL) during the license procedure for the 2014–15 2. Bundesliga season. As part of a compromise with the DFL, the club agreed to redesign its crest and introduced the current crest. The current crest is significantly different from the crests used by other Red Bull football teams, although it is identical to the modified crest used by FC Red Bull Salzburg for international matches and due to UEFA regulations. The yellow sun has been changed in favor of a football and the initials of "RasenBallsport" have been relocated to the bottom of the crest and are no longer highlighted in red.

Kit suppliers and shirt sponsors

Period Supplier Shirt Sponsor Sleeve sponsor
2009–2014 Adidas Red Bull None
2014–2017 Nike
2017–2021 CG Immobilien
2021–2022 CG Immobilien / Veganz
(in cup and UEFA matches)
2022–2023 AOC Die Stadtentwickler / Veganz
(in cup and UEFA matches)
2023–present AOC Die Stadtentwickler / IHG Hotels & Resorts
(in cup and UEFA matches)

Stadium

RB Leipzig played its inaugural season in 2009–10 at the Stadion am Bad in Markranstädt. The stadium held 5,000 seats and was the traditional home ground of SSV Markranstädt. The plans were however that the first team would quickly move to the far larger Zentralstadion, hopefully in 2010, after an advance to the Regionalliga. Red Bull GmbH reserved the naming right to the stadium at the club's founding, meaning that the name could not be sold to anyone else. The company negotiated the acquisition of the naming right during the successful 2009–10 season and the proposed new name was approved by the City of Leipzig on 25 March 2010. Red Bull GmbH then acquired the naming right and the Zentralstadion was renamed "Red Bull Arena" on 1 July 2010. The contract runs until 2040. The inauguration was held on 24 July 2010, in a friendly match against Schalke 04, in front of 21,566 spectators.

Red Bull Arena had a capacity of 44,345 seats during the 2014–15 season. In March 2015, RB Leipzig announced that it was going to invest 5 million euros in a redevelopment of the stadium, including an expansion of the VIP area, pressbox and wheelchair spaces. It also included two new larger LED score boards and refurbished player facilities. The VIP area was expanded from 700 seats to approximately 1400 seats. The capacity of Red Bull Arena was reduced to 42,959 seats before the 2015–16 season, due to redevelopment of various stadium areas.

The Red Bull Arena was an all-seater stadium for a long time. Home supporters are located in sector B. During the general meeting of the supporters' union in 2014, the assembly made a demand to convert sector B into a standing area. However, it was considered impossible to convert sector B into a standing area at the time, for structural reasons. Sector B was eventually converted into a standing area in the 2021–22 season.

Attendances

The 29 July 2011 first round 3–2 victory over VfL Wolfsburg was the club's first appearance in the 2011–12 DFB-Pokal; the 31,212 spectators gathered marked a club attendance record for the Red Bull Arena. The record did not stand long though; on 25 October 2011 Leipzig were defeated 1–0 by FC Augsburg, this second-round game of the DFB-Pokal set a new record attendance of 34,341 spectators.

The last home game of the 2013–14 3. Liga season on 3 May 2014 was a chance for RB Leipzig to secure direct promotion to the 2. Bundesliga; Leipzig romped home emphatically winning 5–1 against 1. FC Saarbrücken in a near-sell out capacity Red Bull Arena, in front of a record 42,713 spectators. The 43,348 spectators who watched the third round of the 2014–15 DFB-Pokal against VfL Wolfsburg on 4 March 2015, sold out the Red Bull Arena for the first time, setting the current club record for a match at the Red Bull Arena as of 2016.

RB Leipzig holds two attendance records. The 2011 Saxony Cup final against Chemnitzer FC on 1 June 2011 at the Red Bull Arena was attended by 13,958 spectators. The attendance set a new record for a Saxony Cup final. The record was broken two years later, once again in a final between RB Leipzig and Chemnizer FC. The 2013 Saxony Cup final against Chemnitzer FC on 15 May 2013 at the Red Bull Arena was attended by 16,864 spectators. The second attendance record held by RB Leipzig was set during the 2012–13 season, in the qualification for the 3. Liga. The qualifying match against Sportfreunde Lotte on 29 May 2013 at the Red Bull Arena was attended by 30,104 spectators. The attendance set a new record for a match in the fourth tier of the German football league system.

RB Leipzig played its hundredth match at the Red Bull Arena on 4 October 2015, against 1. FC Nürnberg. At that point, the club reported a total attendance of 1,464,215 spectators, or an average of 14,643 spectators, for matches at the Red Bull Arena.

Their first Bundesliga home match was played on 10 September 2016 versus Borussia Dortmund in front of 42,558 spectators. In their debut season, the team averaged 41,454 spectators, or 97% of the stadium's capacity.

Average home league attendances

Season Average attendance
2009–10 2,150
2010–11 4,206
2011–12 7,401
2012–13 7,563
2013–14 16,734
2014–15 25,025
2015–16 29,441
2016–17 41,454
2017–18 39,397
2018–19 38,380
2019–20 28,819
2020–21 1,059
2021–22 22,124
2022–23 45,559

Expansion

In October 2014, German media reported that the club wanted to expand the Red Bull Arena to 55,000 seats for future first division Bundesliga play. An expansion to 55,000 seats would make the stadium one of the ten largest football venues in Germany. Who was to finance such an expansion remained unclear. German media considered that a possible option was that Red Bull GmbH buy the stadium to make the investments itself, but it was also considered unlikely that the current owner would be prepared to sell the stadium, which had just turned profitable.

The club had previously reserved an area near the A14 motorway north of Leipzig, close to the Leipzig/Halle Airport, which could be used to build a completely new stadium. It could also be used to put pressure on the current owner of the Red Bull Arena to agree to an expansion. In March 2015, German media reported the club considered building a new stadium on the area north of Leipzig. It could be modeled after the Veltins-Arena in Gelsenkirchen or the Esprit Arena in Düsseldorf, with a significantly larger capacity than Red Bull arena, possibly up to 80,000 seats.

The current owner of Red Bull Arena, Michael Kölmel, commented on plans to build a new stadium in an interview in August 2015. He pointed out how a new stadium on the outskirts of Leipzig could be detrimental to fan culture, and said that Red Bull Arena could be expanded to 55,000 seats, or even more.

In October 2015, expansion of the Red Bull Arena was back on the agenda. New plans were made to expand the stadium to 57,000 seats, involving Viennese architect Albert Wimmer. Reconstruction could start over the summer break of 2016. In January 2016, the club decided to put the plans on hold, at least until 2017.

In February 2016, German newspaper Leipziger Volkszeitung reported that club management again considered the possibility of building a new stadium with a capacity of 80,000 seats north of Leipzig. However, a prerequisite for such a project would be that ticket demand exceed the supply of seats in the Red Bull Arena significantly and sustainably. A move to a new stadium could be possible in 2020, when the club's current contract to lease the Red Bull Arena expires.

In December 2016, RB Leipzig offered that the stadium would be sold by former owner Michael Kölmel to the club to continue the plans from the 2015 agenda. Due to the transfer of the arena into ownership of Red Bull, a new stadium would not be pursued. It was planned, that the stadium would expand to a total of 53,840 seats as of summer 2021, beginning from November 2018, when construction works started. However, the plans were changed during construction and the expansion work was completed in 2021 with a total capacity of 47,069 spectators, of which 37,069 can be seated, at national competitions.

Training center

In 2010, Red Bull announced its intention to engage long term in Leipzig. In this context the club sought a location for a training center and a youth academy. Towards the end of the year, the club made concrete plans to invest 30 million euros in a training center comprising six pitches, offices and a youth academy. The training center was to be located at Cottaweg, partly on the area of the naturally protected riparian forest Leipziger Auwald and the site of the traditional fair Leipziger Kleinmesse. The plans met objections and concerns from environmental organizations and from the current users of the area, a Leipzig fairground association and the football club BSV Schönau 1983. After negotiations, the City of Leipzig agreed to the plans on 15 December 2010. RB Leipzig and the city of Leipzig later announced that the club was going to invest in an area of 92,000 square meters.

The construction was to be carried out in two phases and began in March 2011. During the first phase, three natural turf pitches, one artificial turf pitch and an artificial hill for physical exercises were built. All four pitches were installed with floodlights, irrigation system and soil heating. Pitch one was also provided with four 38-meter masts producing HD-compatible lightning for optimal television broadcasts. Locker rooms, sanitary facilities and weight rooms were installed in 60 containers, totaling 720 square meters. The first section of the training center was opened in August 2011.

Trainingszentrum RB Leipzig
The RB Leipzig training center at Cottaweg

The second phase of construction began in January 2014. The plans for the second phase were set to create one of Germany's largest training centers for an estimated cost of 35 million euros. Involved in the project was the Dortmund based architect Christoph Helbich, who had previously been involved in the building of a new training center for Borussia Dortmund. For the second phase, the training center was to be expanded with two pitches, an area for goalkeeping practices and a three-story 13,500 square meters sports complex, meant to offer amenities for all RB Leipzig teams, from the U8 team to the professional team. In addition, pitch one was to be provided with a covered grandstand with at least 1,000 seats, for A- and B-junior matches.

The new sports complex was opened in September 2015 and taken in use by the professional team and six junior teams, from U14 to the reserve team. It contains an 800 square meters indoor hall, an indoor tartan track for sprint exercises, weight rooms, cold chambers, a spa area, medical facilities and individual relaxation rooms for each professional player. It also houses a media center, new offices, a boarding school for 50 youth players and a café for parents and fans. The RB Leipzig training center with its sports complex is considered one of the most unique and modern in Germany.

Constructed in the spring of 2016 was a covered grandstand with 1,000 seats, an area for motor skills-training and a parking area. The artificial hill for physical exercises, humorously called the "Felix Magath Memorial Hill", was also reconstructed.

The club has already plans for even further expansions of the training center. The club wants to build an additional pitch to the south of the training center. Such expansion would require more ground from the Leipziger Kleinmesse, and is therefore met with several objections. More certain is a future expansion to the north of the training center. This area is used by the football club BSV Schönau 1983 and the tennis club TC Grün-Weiß Leipzig. BSV Schönau 1983 has a contract to lease the area until 2026. The club ceded parts of its grounds to RB Leipzig in 2011. For this, the club received compensation. In total, RB Leipzig spent 900,000 euros for the construction of new grounds for BSC Schönau 1983. The area currently leased by BSV Schönau 1983 is already pledged to RB Leipzig when the lease contract ends in 2026.

Supporters

FC Salzburg gegen RasenBallsport Leipzig (Euroleague Gruppenphase Fünfte Runde) 09
RB Leipzig supporters

RB Leipzig has 68 official fanclubs as of August 2023. The first two to become registered as official fanclubs were L.E Bulls and Bulls Club, both registered in 2009. L.E Bulls is the oldest official fanclub, but Bulls Club claims to be the biggest. There are also several non-official fanclubs, such as Rasenballisten and Fraktion Red Pride. RB Leipzig also has a minor ultras scene with groups such as Red Aces and Lecrats. The German newspaper Mitteldeutsche Zeitung reported that RB Leipzig had 5,000 organized supporters by March 2016.

RB Leipzig supporters travelled in numbers to the first away match of 2016, against FC St. Pauli on 12 February 2016. Nearly 2,500 RB Leipzig supporters made its way to the Millerntorstadion and displayed a red and white flag tifo at the match start. An even higher number of RB Leipzig supporters accompanied the team to Nuremberg one month later. The away match against 1. FC Nürnberg on 20 March 2016 at the Grundig-Stadion was attended by 2,800 RB Leipzig supporters, according to club statistics. The number set a new club record for away supporters, which was broken in the first two Bundesliga seasons. More than 7,000 supporters attended away matches in Dortmund, Munich and Berlin, with a one-year record at the away match in Berlin, when 8,500 supporters of RBL had gathered to watch their team qualify for the UEFA Champions League. One year later, more than 9,000 fans travelled for the last away game of the 2017–18 season in Berlin.

Sponsorship

RB Leipzig's kits were first provided by German sportswear brand Adidas from the club's founding. In 2014, the club switched to the American sportswear brand Nike, in an agreement that will be in place until at least 2025. In October 2014, the club also entered into promotional agreements with Hugo Boss, Porsche as youth sponsor, and Volkswagen for stadium commercials. On 20 May 2016, RB Leipzig extended its contract with Krostitzer Brauerei to be its official beer partner until 2018.

Charity

In March 2020, RB Leipzig, Borussia Dortmund, Bayern Munich, and Bayer Leverkusen, the four German UEFA Champions League teams for the 2019–20 season, collectively gave €20 million to Bundesliga and 2. Bundesliga teams that were struggling financially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Players

Current squad

No. Position Player
1 Hungary GK Péter Gulácsi
2 France DF Mohamed Simakan
3 Germany DF Christopher Lenz
4 Hungary DF Willi Orbán (captain)
5 France DF El Chadaille Bitshiabu
7 Spain MF Dani Olmo
8 Mali MF Amadou Haidara
9 Denmark FW Yussuf Poulsen
10 Sweden MF Emil Forsberg
11 Germany FW Timo Werner
13 Austria MF Nicolas Seiwald
14 Austria MF Christoph Baumgartner
16 Germany DF Lukas Klostermann
No. Position Player
17 Belgium FW Loïs Openda
18 Portugal MF Fábio Carvalho (on loan from Liverpool)
20 Netherlands MF Xavi Simons (on loan from Paris Saint-Germain)
21 Germany GK Janis Blaswich
22 Germany DF David Raum
23 France DF Castello Lukeba
24 Austria MF Xaver Schlager
25 Germany GK Leopold Zingerle
26 Guinea MF Ilaix Moriba
30 Slovenia FW Benjamin Šeško
36 Germany GK Timo Schlieck
39 Germany DF Benjamin Henrichs
44 Slovenia MF Kevin Kampl (vice-captain)

Players out on loan

No. Position Player
Germany GK Tim Schreiber (at 1. FC Saarbrücken until 30 June 2024)
Spain DF Angeliño (at Galatasaray until 30 June 2024)
Germany DF Sanoussy Ba (at LASK until 30 June 2024)
Germany DF Frederik Jäkel (at SV Elversberg until 30 June 2024)
United States MF Caden Clark (at Vendsyssel FF until 31 December 2023)
No. Position Player
Spain MF Hugo Novoa (at Utrecht until 30 June 2024)
Germany FW Dennis Borkowski (at Dynamo Dresden until 30 June 2024)
Germany FW Fabrice Hartmann (at Sligo Rovers until 30 June 2024)
Portugal FW André Silva (at Real Sociedad until 30 June 2024)

Notable players

Most appearances

Statistics correct as of 25 July 2023.

  • The ten players with the most appearances are listed.
  • Appearances include matches in all competitions.
  • Appearances include substitute appearances.
  • Players marked in bold are still playing for the club.
RB Leipzig vs. FC Liefering (Testspiel 9. August 2016) 23
Yussuf Poulsen is RB Leipzig's most capped player.
Most appearances
Rank Player Nationality Position Tenure Apps
1 Poulsen, YussufYussuf Poulsen  Denmark Forward 2013– 358
2 Forsberg, EmilEmil Forsberg  Sweden Midfielder 2015– 303
3 Orbán, WilliWilli Orbán  Hungary Defender 2015– 288
4 Gulácsi, PéterPéter Gulácsi  Hungary Goalkeeper 2015– 284
5 Klostermann, LukasLukas Klostermann  Germany Defender 2014– 257
6 Halstenberg, MarcelMarcel Halstenberg  Germany Defender 2015–2023 240
7 Sabitzer, MarcelMarcel Sabitzer  Austria Forward 2014–2021 229
8 Demme, DiegoDiego Demme  Germany Midfielder 2014–2020 214
9 Kampl, KevinKevin Kampl  Slovenia Midfielder 2017– 211
10 Werner, TimoTimo Werner  Germany Forward 2016–2020, 2022– 199

Top goalscorers

Statistics correct as of 27th September 2023.

  • The ten players with the most goals are listed.
  • Players marked in bold are still playing for the club.
2020-03-10 Fußball, Männer, UEFA Champions League Achtelfinale, RB Leipzig - Tottenham Hotspur 1DX 3684 by Stepro
Timo Werner is RB Leipzig's top goalscorer.
Most goals
Rank Player Nationality Position Tenure Goals
1 Werner, TimoTimo Werner  Germany Forward 2016–2020, 2022– 112
2 Frahn, DanielDaniel Frahn  Germany Forward 2010–2015 87
3 Poulsen, YussufYussuf Poulsen  Denmark Forward 2013– 85
4 Nkunku, ChristopherChristopher Nkunku  France Forward 2019–2023 70
5 Forsberg, EmilEmil Forsberg  Sweden Midfielder 2014– 68
6 Sabitzer, MarcelMarcel Sabitzer  Austria Midfielder 2014–2021 52
7 Kaiser, DominikDominik Kaiser  Germany Midfielder 2012–2018 34
8 Kutschke, StefanStefan Kutschke  Germany Forward 2010–2013 27
Orbán, WilliWilli Orbán  Hungary Defender 2015–
10 André Silva  Portugal Forward 2021– 26

Captains

  • Only captains in competitive matches are included.
  • Players marked in bold are still playing in the professional team.
Captain Nationality Years Notes
Hertzsch, IngoIngo Hertzsch  Germany 2009–2010
Tim Sebastian  Germany 2010–2011
Frahn, DanielDaniel Frahn  Germany 2011–2015
Kaiser, DominikDominik Kaiser  Germany 2015–2017
Orbán, WilliWilli Orbán  Hungary 2017–2020
Sabitzer, MarcelMarcel Sabitzer  Austria 2020–2021
Gulácsi, PéterPéter Gulácsi  Hungary 2021–

Staff

Current staff

Position Name Notes
Manager Germany Marco Rose
Assistant manager Germany Frank Geideck
Germany Alexander Zickler
First-team coach Germany Marco Kurth
Goalkeeping coach Germany Frederik Gößling
Athletic coach Germany Daniel Behlau
Athletic coach Germany Ruwen Faller
Athletic coach Germany Kai Kraft
Sporting coordinator Germany Felix Krüger
Team manager Senegal Babacar N'Diaye
Head of match analysis Germany Fabian Friedrich
Head of medicine & sports science Germany Dr. Helge Riepenhof
Head of sports science England Jack Nayler
Team doctor Germany Dr. Robert Percy Marshall
Team doctor Germany Dr. Frank Striegler
Team doctor Germany Jan-Niklas Droste
Mental performance coach United States Peter Schneider

Coach history

No. Head coach Nationality From Until Days Notes
1 Vogel, TinoTino Vogel  Germany 1 July 2009 30 June 2010 364
2 Oral, TomasTomas Oral  Germany 1 July 2010 30 June 2011 364
3 Pacult, PeterPeter Pacult  Austria 1 July 2011 30 June 2012 365
4 Zorniger, AlexanderAlexander Zorniger  Germany 1 July 2012 11 February 2015 954
5 Beierlorzer , AchimAchim Beierlorzer  Germany 11 February 2015 30 June 2015 139 Note 1
6 Rangnick, RalfRalf Rangnick  Germany 1 July 2015 30 June 2016 365
7 Hasenhüttl, RalphRalph Hasenhüttl  Austria 1 July 2016 16 May 2018 684
8 Rangnick, RalfRalf Rangnick  Germany 9 July 2018 30 June 2019 356
9 Nagelsmann, JulianJulian Nagelsmann  Germany 1 July 2019 30 June 2021 730
10 Marsch, JesseJesse Marsch  United States 1 July 2021 5 December 2021 157
11 Beierlorzer, AchimAchim Beierlorzer  Germany 5 December 2021 9 December 2021 4 Note 1
12 Tedesco, DomenicoDomenico Tedesco  Italy 9 December 2021 7 September 2022 272
13 Rose, MarcoMarco Rose  Germany 8 September 2022 589

Notes

  1. Interim coach.

Season history

Season League Pos W D L GF GA Pts DFB-Pokal
2018–19 Bundesliga 3rd 19 9 6 63 29 66 Runners-up
2019–20 Bundesliga 3rd 18 12 4 81 37 66 Round of 16
2020–21 Bundesliga 2nd 19 8 7 60 32 65 Runners-up
2021–22 Bundesliga 4th 17 7 10 72 37 58 Winners
2022–23 Bundesliga 3rd 20 6 8 64 41 66 Winners
Green marks a season followed by promotion

European competitions

Overview

Having finished as runners-up in their debut season in the German top flight, RB Leipzig gained entry to continental football for the first time, specifically the 2017–18 UEFA Champions League. RB Leipzig is one of the first clubs in history to qualify for the Champions League so soon (eight years) after its creation. The campaign also saw Red Bull Salzburg qualify as Austrian champions; this raised the issue of a possible conflict of interest between the clubs due to the level of influence exerted by Red Bull over both teams and the close sporting relationship between them in various aspects. After examining the operational structures during June 2017, UEFA declared themselves satisfied under their regulations that the two clubs (particularly Salzburg) were suitably independent from the Red Bull corporation, and sufficiently distinct from one another, for both be admitted to their competitions.

In the first season following that ruling, both reached the quarter-finals of the 2017–18 UEFA Europa League but did not play each other, with RB Leipzig eliminated by Olympique de Marseille who then also knocked out Salzburg in the semi-finals. However, in the next edition of the same competition, RB Leipzig and Red Bull Salzburg were drawn together in Group B to meet competitively for the first time. Salzburg were the victors in both fixtures between the clubs (3–2 in Germany, 1–0 in Austria) and also won all their other matches to top the group, while Leipzig failed to progress after dropping further points against Celtic and Rosenborg.

UEFA club coefficient ranking

As of 23 September 2023

Rank Team Points
7 England Manchester United 89.000
8 Italy Inter Milan 86.000
9 Germany RB Leipzig 85.000
10 Spain Sevilla 83.000
11 Italy Roma 82.000

Statistics

Competition Pld W D L GF GA GD Win%
UEFA Champions League &&&&&&&&&&&&&044.&&&&&044 &&&&&&&&&&&&&022.&&&&&022 &&&&&&&&&&&&&&05.&&&&&05 &&&&&&&&&&&&&017.&&&&&017 &&&&&&&&&&&&&079.&&&&&079 &&&&&&&&&&&&&080.&&&&&080 −1 &&&&&&&&&&&&&050.&&&&&050.00
UEFA Europa League &&&&&&&&&&&&&024.&&&&&024 &&&&&&&&&&&&&011.&&&&&011 &&&&&&&&&&&&&&07.&&&&&07 &&&&&&&&&&&&&&06.&&&&&06 &&&&&&&&&&&&&040.&&&&&040 &&&&&&&&&&&&&030.&&&&&030 +10 &&&&&&&&&&&&&045.83000045.83
Total &&&&&&&&&&&&&068.&&&&&068 &&&&&&&&&&&&&033.&&&&&033 &&&&&&&&&&&&&012.&&&&&012 &&&&&&&&&&&&&023.&&&&&023 &&&&&&&&&&&&0119.&&&&&0119 &&&&&&&&&&&&0110.&&&&&0110 +9 &&&&&&&&&&&&&048.53000048.53

Results

Season Competition Round Opponent Home Away Aggregate
2017–18 UEFA Champions League Group G France Monaco 1–1 4–1 3rd
Turkey Beşiktaş 1–2 0–2
Portugal Porto 3–2 1–3
UEFA Europa League R32 Italy Napoli 0–2 3–1 3–3 (a)
R16 Russia Zenit Saint Petersburg 2–1 1–1 3–2
QF France Marseille 1–0 2–5 3–5
2018–19 UEFA Europa League 2QR Sweden BK Häcken 4–0 1–1 5–1
3QR Romania Universitatea Craiova 3–1 1–1 4–2
PO Ukraine Zorya Luhansk 3–2 0–0 3–2
Group B Scotland Celtic 2–0 1–2 3rd
Norway Rosenborg 1–1 3–1
Austria Red Bull Salzburg 2–3 0–1
2019–20 UEFA Champions League Group G Portugal Benfica 2–2 2–1 1st
France Lyon 0–2 2–2
Russia Zenit Saint Petersburg 2–1 2–0
R16 England Tottenham Hotspur 3–0 1–0 4–0
QF Spain Atlético Madrid 2–1
SF France Paris Saint-Germain 0–3
2020–21 UEFA Champions League Group H Turkey İstanbul Başakşehir 2–0 4–3 2nd
France Paris Saint-Germain 2–1 0–1
England Manchester United 3–2 0–5
R16 England Liverpool 0–2 0–2 0–4
2021–22 UEFA Champions League Group A England Manchester City 2–1 3–6 3rd
Belgium Club Brugge 1–2 5–0
France Paris Saint-Germain 2–2 2–3
UEFA Europa League KRPO Spain Real Sociedad 2–2 3–1 5–3
R16 Russia Spartak Moscow Bye
QF Italy Atalanta 1–1 2–0 3–1
SF Scotland Rangers 1–0 1–3 2–3
2022–23 UEFA Champions League Group F Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk 1–4 4–0 2nd
Spain Real Madrid 3–2 0–2
Scotland Celtic 3–1 2–0
R16 England Manchester City 1–1 0–7 1–8
2023–24 UEFA Champions League Group G Switzerland Young Boys 2–1 3–1 2nd
England Manchester City 1–3 2–3
Serbia Red Star Belgrade 3–1 2–1
R16 TBD

Source: UEFA.com, Last updated on 13 December 2023

RB Leipzig affiliated teams

RB Leipzig has several affiliated teams, including a women's team, and junior and academy teams.

Relationship with FC Red Bull Salzburg

In 2005, Red Bull bought a club in Salzburg, Austria and re-named them Red Bull Salzburg (so named to circumvent local rules on corporate naming) with the aim of establishing a leading branded team in that country in a similar mould to its existing franchises in Salzburg and other locations. Over the next decade, Leipzig became the owners' main football project, and the close relationship between the teams was exemplified by the number of players moving between them (Georg Teigl, Marcel Sabitzer, Yordy Reyna, and Stefan Ilsanker all transferred from Salzburg to Leipzig) with some of the Austrian fans becoming increasingly annoyed at their best players being signed by the 'step-sibling' club in their mission to climb through the levels of German football. There are also links between their youth systems and scouting networks.

Having finished as runners-up in their debut season in the German top flight, RB Leipzig gained entry to continental football for the first time, specifically the 2017–18 UEFA Champions League for which Red Bull Salzburg had also qualified as Austrian champions; this raised the issue of a possible conflict of interest between the clubs due to the level of influence exerted by Red Bull over both teams and the close sporting relationship between them in various aspects. After examining the operational structures during June 2017, UEFA declared themselves satisfied under their regulations that the two clubs (particularly Salzburg) were suitably independent from the Red Bull corporation, and sufficiently distinct from one another, for both to be admitted to their competitions. In the first season following that ruling, both reached the quarter-finals of the 2017–18 UEFA Europa League but did not play each other, with RB Leipzig eliminated by Olympique de Marseille who then also knocked out Salzburg in the semi-finals. However, in the next edition of the same competition, RB Leipzig and Red Bull Salzburg were drawn together in Group B to meet competitively for the first time. Salzburg were the victors in both fixtures between the clubs (3–2 in Germany, 1–0 in Austria) and also won all their other matches to top the group, while Leipzig failed to progress after dropping further points against Celtic and Rosenborg. In December 2020, Dominik Szoboszlai poised to become the second RB Salzburg player to move to RB Leipzig in space of 6 months after Hwang Hee-chan completed the switch in summer. In 2023, they completed deals of both Nicolas Seiwald (€20,000,000) and Benjamin Šeško (€24,000,000) from Salzburg for a total of €54,000,000.

Honours

Domestic

League

  • 3. Liga (III)
    • Runners-up: 2013–14
  • Regionalliga Nordost (IV)
    • Winners: 2012–13
  • NOFV-Oberliga Süd (V)
    • Winners: 2009-10

Cup

  • DFB-Pokal
    • Winners: 2021–22, 2022–23
    • Runners-up: 2018–19, 2020–21
  • Saxony Cup
    • Winners: 2010–11, 2012–13

Affiliated clubs

The following clubs are currently affiliated with RB Leipzig:

The following clubs were affiliated with RB Leipzig in the past:

  • Germany SSV Markranstädt (2009–2010)
  • Ghana Red Bull Ghana (2009–2014)
  • Germany ESV Delitzsch (2010–2011)

See also

Kids robot.svg In Spanish: RasenBallsport Leipzig para niños

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RB Leipzig Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.