Fort Worth, Texas facts for kids

Kids Encyclopedia Facts
(Redirected from Fort Worth)
Fort Worth, Texas
City
City of Fort Worth
Skyline of Fort Worth
Skyline of Fort Worth
Official seal of Fort Worth, Texas
Seal
Nickname(s): Cowtown, Panther City
Motto: "Where the West begins"
Location of Fort Worth in Tarrant County, Texas
Location of Fort Worth in Tarrant County, Texas
Country  United States of America
State  Texas
Counties Tarrant, Denton, Parker, Wise
Incorporated 1873
Named for William J. Worth
Area
 • City 349.2 sq mi (904.4 km2)
 • Land 342.2 sq mi (886.3 km2)
 • Water 7.0 sq mi (18.1 km2)
Elevation 653 ft (216 m)
Population (2015)
 • City 833,319 (US: 16th)
 • Density 2,181.0/sq mi (842.0/km2)
 • Metro 7,102,796 (US: 4th)
 • Demonym Fort Worther
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP Codes 76008, 76028, 76036, 76101-76124, 76126-76127, 76130-76137, 76140, 76147-76148, 76150, 76155, 76161-76164, 76166, 76177, 76179, 76180-76182, 76185, 76191-76193, 76195-76199, 76244, 76247, 76262, 76129 (exclusive to TCU), 76107
Area code(s) Area codes 817, 682 and 469,
FIPS code 48-27000
GNIS feature ID 1380947
Interstates I-20.svg I-30.svg I-35W.svg I-820.svg
U.S. Routes US 81.svg US 287.svg US 377.svg
Website fortworthtexas.gov

Fort Worth is the 16th-largest city in the United States and the fifth-largest city in the state of Texas. The city is in North Central Texas and covers nearly 350 square miles (910 km2) in the counties of Denton, Parker, Wise, and Tarrant, of which it is the county seat. According to the 2015 census, estimates, Fort Worth's population is 833,319. The city is the second-largest in the Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington metropolitan area (the "DFW Metroplex").

The city was established in 1849 as an Army outpost on a bluff overlooking the Trinity River. Today, Fort Worth still embraces its Western heritage and traditional architecture and design. USS Fort Worth (LCS-3) is the first ship of the United States Navy named after the city.

Fort Worth is home to the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition and several world-class museums designed by internationally known contemporary architects. The Kimbell Art Museum, considered to have one of the best collections in Texas, is housed in what is widely regarded as one of the state's foremost works of modern architecture, designed by Louis Kahn with an addition by Renzo Piano. Also of note is the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, designed by Tadao Ando. The Amon Carter Museum of American Art, designed by Philip Johnson, houses one of the world's most extensive collections of American art in a building. The Sid Richardson Museum, redesigned by David M. Schwarz, has one of the most focused collections of Western Art in the U.S., emphasizing Frederic Remington and Charles Russell.

The city is stimulated by several university communities: Texas Christian, Texas Wesleyan, University of North Texas Health Science Center, and Texas A&M University School of Law, and many multinational corporations, including Bell Helicopter, Lockheed Martin, American Airlines, BNSF Railway, Pier 1 Imports, and Radio Shack.

History

Treaty of Bird's Fort

Fort Worth Texas Historical Marker
Fort Worth Texas Historical Marker

The Treaty of Bird's Fort between the Republic of Texas and several Native American tribes was signed in 1843 at Bird's Fort in present-day Arlington, Texas. Article XI of the treaty provided that no one may "pass the line of trading houses" (at the border of the Indians' territory) without permission of the President of Texas, and may not reside or remain in the Indians' territory. These "trading houses" were later established at the junction of the Clear Fork and West Fork of the Trinity River in present-day Fort Worth. At this river junction, the U.S. War Department established Fort Worth in 1849 as the northernmost of a system of 10 forts for protecting the American Frontier following the end of the Mexican–American War. The City of Fort Worth continues to be known as "where the West begins."

Mexican–American War

Old map-Fort Worth-1876
Lithograph (1876)

A line of seven army posts were established in 1848–49 after the Mexican War to protect the settlers of Texas along the western American Frontier and included Fort Worth, Fort Graham, Fort Gates, Fort Croghan, Fort Martin Scott, Fort Lincoln, and Fort Duncan. Originally 10 forts had been proposed by Major General William Jenkins Worth (1794–1849), who commanded the Department of Texas in 1849. In January 1849, Worth proposed a line of 10 forts to mark the western Texas frontier from Eagle Pass to the confluence of the West Fork and Clear Fork of the Trinity River. One month later, Worth died from cholera in South Texas.

General William S. Harney assumed command of the Department of Texas and ordered Major Ripley A. Arnold (Company F, Second United States Dragoons) to find a new fort site near the West Fork and Clear Fork. On June 6, 1849, Arnold, advised by Middleton Tate Johnson, established a camp on the bank of the Trinity River and named the post Camp Worth in honor of the late General Worth. In August 1849, Arnold moved the camp to the north-facing bluff, which overlooked the mouth of the Clear Fork of the Trinity River. The United States War Department officially named the post Fort Worth on November 14, 1849.

Native American attacks were still a threat in the area, as this was their traditional territory and they resented encroachment by European-American settlers, but people from the United States set up homesteads near the fort. E. S. Terrell (1812–1905) from Tennessee claimed to be the first resident of Fort Worth. The fort was flooded the first year and moved to the top of the bluff; the current courthouse was built on this site. The fort was abandoned September 17, 1853. No trace of it remains.

Town development

As a stop on the legendary Chisholm Trail, Fort Worth was stimulated by the business of the cattle drives and became a brawling, bustling town. Millions of head of cattle were driven north to market along this trail. Fort Worth became the center of the cattle drives, and later, the ranching industry. It was given the nickname of "Cowtown".

During Civil War, Fort Worth suffered from shortages of money, food, and supplies. the population dropped as low a 175, but began to recover during Reconstruction. By 1872, Jacob Samuels, William Jesse Boaz, and William Henry Davis had opened general stores. The next year, Khleber M. Van Zandt established Tidball, Van Zandt, and Company, which became Fort Worth National Bank in 1884.

Late 20th and early 21st centuries

1920 panorama

On March 28, 2000, at 6:15 pm, an F3 (some estimates claim an F4) tornado smashed through downtown, tearing many buildings into shreds and scrap metal. One of the hardest-hit structures was the Bank One Tower, which was one of the dominant features of the Fort Worth skyline and which had Reata, a popular restaurant, on its top floor. It has since been converted to upscale condominiums and officially renamed "The Tower". This was the first major tornado to strike Fort Worth proper since the early 1940s.

When oil began to gush in West Texas in the early 20th century, and again in the late 1970s, Fort Worth was at the center of the wheeling and dealing. In July 2007, advances in horizontal drilling technology made vast natural gas reserves in the Barnett Shale available directly under the city, helping many residents receive royalty checks for their mineral rights. Today, the city of Fort Worth and many residents are dealing with the benefits and issues associated with the natural gas reserves under ground.

Fort Worth was the fastest-growing large city in the United States from 2000 to 2006 and was voted one of "America's Most Livable Communities."

View of downtown from the West 7th district, June 2010

Geography and climate

MVI 2798 Fort Worth skyline from Cultural District
Fort Worth skyline from the Amon Carter Museum

Fort Worth is located in North Texas, and has a generally humid subtropical climate. It is part of the Cross Timbers region; this region is a boundary between the more heavily forested eastern parts and the rolling hills and prairies of the central part. Specifically, the city is part of the Grand Prairie ecoregion within the Cross Timbers.

FW Night
Downtown Fort Worth at night

The Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex is the hub of the North Texas region. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 298.9 square miles (774 km2), of which 292.5 square miles (758 km2) is land and 6.3 square miles (16 km2) (2.12%) is covered by water.

A large storage dam was completed in 1914 on the West Fork of the Trinity River, 7 miles (11 km) from the city, with a storage capacity of 33,495 acre feet of water. The lake formed by this dam is known as Lake Worth.

The city is not entirely contiguous and has several enclaves, practical enclaves, semi-enclaves and cities that are otherwise completely or nearly surrounded by it, including: Westworth Village, River Oaks, Saginaw, Blue Mound, Benbrook, Everman, Forest Hill, Edgecliff Village, Westover Hills, White Settlement, Sansom Park, Lake Worth, Lakeside, and Haslet.

Cityscape

See also: List of neighborhoods in Fort Worth, Texas

Architecture

Sundance Christmas Tree s
Aerial view of Sundance Square in 2008

Downtown is mainly known for its Art Deco-style buildings. The Tarrant County Courthouse was created in the American Beaux Arts design, which was modeled after the Texas State Capitol building. Most of the structures around Sundance Square have preserved their early 20th-century façades. Downtown has a unique rustic architecture.

Natural gas wells

The city of Fort Worth contains over 1000 natural gas wells (December 2009 count) tapping the Barnett Shale. Each well site is a bare patch of gravel 2–5 acres (8,100–20,200 m2) in size. As city ordinances permit them in all zoning categories, including residential, well sites can be found in a variety of locations. Some wells are surrounded by masonry fences, but most are secured by chain link.

Surrounding municipalities

Climate

Fort Worth has a humid subtropical climate according to the Köppen climate classification system and is within USDA hardiness zone 8a. The hottest month of the year is July, when the average high temperature is 95 °F (35.0 °C), and overnight low temperatures average 72 °F (22.2 °C), giving an average temperature of 84 °F (28.9 °C). The coldest month of the year is January, when the average high temperature is 55 °F (12.8 °C) and low temperatures average 31 °F (−0.6 °C). The average temperature in January is 43 °F (6 °C). The highest temperature ever recorded in Fort Worth is 113 °F (45.0 °C), on June 26, 1980, during the Great 1980 Heat Wave, and June 27, 1980. The coldest temperature ever recorded in Fort Worth was −8 °F (−22.2 °C) on February 12, 1899. Because of its position in North Texas, Fort Worth is very susceptible to supercell thunderstorms, which produce large hail and can produce tornados.

The average annual precipitation for Fort Worth is 34.01 inches (863.9 mm). The wettest month of the year is May, when an average of 4.58 inches (116.3 mm) of precipitation falls. The driest month of the year is January, when only 1.70 inches (43.2 mm) of precipitation falls. The driest calendar year since records began has been 1921 with 17.91 inches (454.9 mm) and the wettest 2015 with 62.61 inches (1,590.3 mm). The wettest calendar month has been April 1922 with 17.64 inches (448.1 mm), including 8.56 inches (217.4 mm) on April 25.

The average annual snowfall in Fort Worth is 2.6 inches (0.07 m). The most snowfall in one month has been 13.5 inches (0.34 m) in February 1978, and the most in a season 17.6 inches (0.45 m) in 1977/1978.

The National Weather Service office which serves the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex is based in the northeastern part of Fort Worth.

Climate data for Fort Worth, Texas
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 80
(26.7)
79
(26.1)
87
(30.6)
92
(33.3)
97
(36.1)
102
(38.9)
110
(43.3)
113
(45)
111
(43.9)
103
(39.4)
89
(31.7)
83
(28.3)
113
(45)
Average high °F (°C) 54.1
(12.28)
60.1
(15.61)
68.3
(20.17)
75.9
(24.39)
83.2
(28.44)
91.1
(32.83)
95.4
(35.22)
94.8
(34.89)
87.7
(30.94)
77.9
(25.5)
65.1
(18.39)
56.5
(13.61)
75.84
(24.356)
Daily mean °F (°C) 44.1
(6.72)
49.4
(9.67)
57.4
(14.11)
65.0
(18.33)
73.1
(22.83)
80.9
(27.17)
85.0
(29.44)
84.4
(29.11)
77.5
(25.28)
67.2
(19.56)
55.1
(12.83)
46.7
(8.17)
65.48
(18.602)
Average low °F (°C) 34.0
(1.11)
38.7
(3.72)
46.4
(8)
54.0
(12.22)
63.0
(17.22)
70.7
(21.5)
74.6
(23.67)
74.0
(23.33)
67.2
(19.56)
56.4
(13.56)
45.1
(7.28)
36.8
(2.67)
55.08
(12.819)
Record low °F (°C) −7
(-21.7)
−5
(-20.6)
−2
(-18.9)
21
(-6.1)
32
(0)
43
(6.1)
52
(11.1)
59
(15)
31
(-0.6)
24
(-4.4)
−3
(-19.4)
−5
(-20.6)
−7
(-21.7)
Precipitation inches (mm) 1.89
(48)
2.37
(60.2)
3.06
(77.7)
3.20
(81.3)
5.15
(130.8)
3.23
(82)
2.12
(53.8)
2.03
(51.6)
2.42
(61.5)
4.11
(104.4)
2.57
(65.3)
2.57
(65.3)
34.72
(881.9)
Avg. precipitation days 7.2 6.1 7.5 7.2 9.3 7.2 4.7 4.5 5.8 7.1 6.7 6.5 79.8
Source: National Climatic Data Center

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 6,663
1890 23,076 246.3%
1900 26,668 15.6%
1910 73,312 174.9%
1920 106,482 45.2%
1930 163,447 53.5%
1940 177,662 8.7%
1950 278,778 56.9%
1960 356,268 27.8%
1970 393,476 10.4%
1980 385,164 −2.1%
1990 447,619 16.2%
2000 534,697 19.5%
2010 741,206 38.6%
Est. 2015 833,319 12.4%
U.S. Decennial Census
2013 Estimate
Racial composition 2010 1990 1970 1940
White 61.6% 63.8% 79.4% 85.7%
—Non-Hispanic 41.7% 56.5% 72.0% n/a
Black or African American 18.9% 22.0% 19.9% 14.2%
Hispanic or Latino (of any race) 34.1% 19.5% 7.9% n/a
Asian 3.7% 2.0% 0.1% -
Race and ethnicity 2010- Fort Worth (5560466366)
Map of racial distribution in Fort Worth, 2010 U.S. Census. Each dot is 25 people: White, Black, Asian Hispanic, or Other (yellow)

According to the 2010 census, the racial composition of Fort Worth was:

  • White: 61.1% (non-Hispanic Whites: 41.7%)
  • Black or African American: 18.9%
  • Native American: 0.6%
  • Asian: 3.7% (1.0% Vietnamese, 0.6% Indian, 0.4% Laotian, 0.3% Filipino, 0.3% Korean, 0.3% Chinese, 0.1% Pakistani, 0.1% Burmese, 0.1% Cambodian, 0.1% Nepalese, 0.1% Thai, 0.1% Japanese)
  • Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%
  • Two or more races: 3.1%
  • Hispanic or Latino (of any race): 34.1% (29.6% Mexican, 1.3% Salvadoran, 0.8% Puerto Rican, 0.6% Honduran, 0.4% Guatemalan, 0.2% Cuban)

As of the census of 2000, 534,694 people, 195,078 households, and 127,581 families resided in the city. The July 2004 census estimates have placed Fort Worth in the top 20 most populous cities (# 19) in the U.S. with the population at 604,538. Fort Worth is also in the top five cities with the largest numerical increase from July 1, 2003 to July 1, 2004, with 17,872 more people or a 3.1% increase. The population density was 1,827.8 people per square mile (705.7/km²). There were 211,035 housing units at an average density of 721.4 per square mile (278.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 59.69% White, 20.26% Black or African American, 0.59% Native American, 2.64% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 14.05% from other races, and 2.72% from two or more races. About 29.81% of the population were Hispanics or Latinos of any race.

In 1970, the Census Bureau reported Fort Worth's population as 72% non-Hispanic White, 19.9% Black, and 7.9% Hispanic.

Of the 195,078 households, 34.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.8% were married couples living together, 14.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.6% were not families; 9,599 were unmarried partner households: 8,202 heterosexual, 676 same-sex male, and 721 same-sex female households. About 28.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.67 and the average family size was 3.33.

In the city, the population was distributed as 28.3% under the age of 18, 11.3% from 18 to 24, 32.7% from 25 to 44, 18.2% from 45 to 64, and 9.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $37,074, and for a family was $42,939. Males had a median income of $31,663 versus $25,917 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,800. About 12.7% of families and 15.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.4% of those under age 18 and 11.7% of those age 65 or over.

Culture

Building on its frontier western heritage and a history of strong local arts patronage, Fort Worth, in recent years, has begun promoting itself as the "City of Cowboys and Culture". Fort Worth has the world's first and largest indoor rodeo.

Arts and sciences

Theatre

Bass Performance Hall, Casa Mañana, Stage West Theatre, Kids Who Care Inc., Jubilee Theater, Circle Theatre, Amphibian Stage Productions

Museums
MVI 2781 Fort Worth Museum of Science and History
Fort Worth Museum of Science and History is adjacent to the National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame

Kimbell Art Museum, Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Sid Richardson Museum, Fort Worth Museum of Science and History, National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame, Military Museum of Fort Worth, Texas Civil War Museum, Texas Cowboy Hall of Fame, Fort Worth Stockyards Museum, Al and Ann Stohlman Museum, Lenora Rolla Heritage Center Museum, National Multicultural Western Heritage Museum

Music

Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra, Billy Bob's, Texas Ballet Theater, Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, Fort Worth Opera, Live Eclectic Music (Ridglea Theater)

The Academy of Western Artists, based in Gene Autry, Oklahoma presents its annual awards in Fort Worth in fields related to the American cowboy, including music, literature, and even chuckwagon cooking.

Nature

The Fort Worth Zoo is home to over 5000 animals and has been named as a top zoo in the nation by Family Life magazine, the Los Angeles Times, and USA Today and one of the top zoos in the South by Southern Living Reader's Choice Awards; it has been ranked in the top 10 zoos in the United States.

The Fort Worth Botanic Garden and the Botanical Research Institute of Texas are also in the city. For those interested in hiking, birding, or canoeing, the Fort Worth Nature Center and Refuge in northwest Fort Worth is a 3621-acre preserved natural area designated by the Department of the Interior as a National Natural Landmark Site in 1980. Established in 1964 as the Greer Island Nature Center and Refuge, it celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2014. The Nature Center has small, genetically pure bison herd, a resident prairie dog town, and the prairie upon which they live. It is one of the largest urban parks of its type in the U.S.

Parks

Fort Worth has a total of 263 parks with 179 of those being neighborhood parks. The total acres of park land is 11,700.72 acres with the average being about 12.13 acres per park.

There are two dog parks located in the city including ZBonz Dog Park and Fort Woof. These are both off-leash dog parks. Fort Woof was recognized by Dog Fancy Magazine as the No. 1 Dog Park in the Nation in 2006, and as City Voter's the Best Dog Park in the Metroplex in 2009. The park includes an agility course, water fountains, shaded shelters and waste stations.

Sports and recreation

While much of Fort Worth's sports attention is focused on the Metroplex's professional sports teams, the city has its own athletic identity. The TCU Horned Frogs compete in NCAA Division I athletics, including the football team, consistently ranked in the top 25, and the baseball team, which has competed in the last six NCAA tournaments and 3 straight CWS, coming within a win of making the College World Series finals in 2009 and 2016. The women's basketball team has competed in the last seven NCAA tournaments. Texas Wesleyan University competes in the NAIA, and won the 2006 NAIA Div. I Men's Basketball championship and three-time National Collegiate Table Tennis Association (NCTTA) team championships (2004–2006). Fort Worth is also home to the NCAA football Bell Helicopter Armed Forces Bowl, as well as four minor-league professional sports teams. One of these minor league teams, the Fort Worth Cats baseball team, was reborn in 2001. The original Cats were a very popular minor league team in Fort Worth from the 19th century (when they were called the Panthers) until 1960, when the team was merged into the Dallas Rangers.

TCU Horned Frogs

The presence of Texas Christian University less than 5 miles (8 km) from downtown and national competitiveness in football, baseball, and men's and women's basketball have sustained TCU as an important part of Fort Worth's sports scene.

The Horned Frog football team produced two national championships in the 1930s and remained a strong competitor in the Southwest Conference into the 1960s before beginning a long period of underperformance. The revival of the TCU football program began under Coach Dennis Franchione with the success of running back LaDainian Tomlinson. Under Head Coach Gary Patterson, the Horned Frogs have developed into a perennial top-10 contender, and a Rose Bowl winner in 2011. Notable players include Sammy Baugh, Davey O'Brien, Bob Lilly, LaDainian Tomlinson, Jerry Hughes, and Andy Dalton. The Horned Frogs, along with their rivals and fellow non-AQ leaders the Boise State Broncos and University of Utah Utes, were deemed the quintessential "BCS Busters", having appeared in both the Fiesta and Rose Bowls. Their "BCS Buster" role ended in 2012 when they joined the Big 12 athletic conference in all sports. The Horned Frog football teams have one of the best winning percentages of any school in the Football Bowl Subdivision in recent years.

Colonial National Invitational Golf Tournament

Fort Worth hosts an important professional men's golf tournament every May at the Colonial Country Club. The Colonial Invitational Golf Tournament, now officially known as the Dean & DeLuca Invitational, is one of the more prestigious and historical events of the tour calendar. The Colonial Country Club was the home course of golfing legend Ben Hogan, who was from Fort Worth.

Professional sports teams

The Fort Worth Cats were a professional baseball team that played in the city and was founded in 2001, as part of the All-American Association. Their home venue was LaGrave Field. The team was disbanded when the league they played in, United League Baseball, formally ceased operation due to low attendance.

Fort Worth Vaqueros FC are a minor league soccer team which began play in the summer of 2014. They are part of the National Premier Soccer League and play their home games at Martin Field.

Motor racing

Fort Worth is home to Texas Motor Speedway, also known as "The Great American Speedway". Texas Motor Speedway is a 1.5-mile quad-oval track located in the far northern part of the city in Denton County. The speedway opened in 1997, and currently hosts an IndyCar event and six NASCAR events among three major race weekends a year.

Amateur sports-car racing in the greater Fort Worth area occurs mostly at two purpose-built tracks: Motorsport Ranch and Eagles Canyon Raceway. Sanctioning bodies include the Porsche Club of America, the National Auto Sports Association, and the Sports Car Club of America.

Cowtown Marathon

The annual Cowtown Marathon has been held every last weekend in February since 1978. The two-day activities include two 5Ks, a 10K, the half marathon, marathon, and ultra marathon. With just under 27,000 participants in 2013, the Cowtown is the largest multiple-distance event in Texas.

Transportation

Like most cities that grew quickly after World War II, Fort Worth's main mode of transportation is the automobile, but bus transportation via The T is available, as well as an interurban train service to Dallas via the Trinity Railway Express.

History

Electric streetcars

Interurban Line between Fort Worth and Dallas, Texas
Interurban Line between Fort Worth and Dallas, Texas (postcard, circa 1902–1924)

The first streetcar company in Fort Worth was the Fort Worth Street Railway Company. Its first line began operating in December 1876, and traveled from the courthouse down Main Street to the T&P Depot. By 1890, more than 20 private companies were operating streetcar lines in Fort Worth. The Fort Worth Street Railway Company bought out many of its competitors, and was eventually itself bought out by the Bishop & Sherwin Syndicate in 1901. The new ownership changed the company's name to the Northern Texas Traction Company, which operated 84 miles of streetcar railways in 1925, and their lines connected downtown Fort Worth to TCU, the Near Southside, Arlington Heights, Lake Como, and the Stockyards.

Electric interurban railways

At its peak, the electric interurban industry in Texas consisted of almost 500 miles of track, making Texas the second in interurban mileage in all states west of the Mississippi River. Electric interurban railways were prominent in the early 1900s, peaking in the 1910s and fading until all electric interurban railways were abandoned by 1948. Close to three-fourths of the mileage was in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, running between Fort Worth and Dallas and to other area cities including Cleburne, Denison, Corsicana, and Waco. The line depicted in the associated image was the second to be constructed in Texas and ran 35 miles between Fort Worth and Dallas. Northern Texas Traction Company built the railway, which was operational from 1902 to 1934.

Current transport

Roads

Fort Worth is served by four interstates and three U.S. highways. It also contains a number of arterial streets in a grid formation.

Interstate highways 30, 20, 35W, and 820 all pass through the city limits.

Interstate 820 is a spur of Interstate 20 and serves as a beltway for the city. Interstate 30 and Interstate 20 connect Fort Worth to Arlington, Grand Prairie, and Dallas. Interstate 35W connects Fort Worth with Hillsboro to the south and the cities of Denton and Gainesville to the north.

FTWORTHTX3224
I-20 in southern Fort Worth

U.S. Route 287 runs southeast through the city connecting Wichita Falls to the north and Mansfield to the south. U.S. Route 377 runs south through the northern suburbs of Haltom City and Keller through the central business district. U.S. Route 81 shares a concurrency with highway 287 on the portion northwest of I-35W.

Notable state highways:

  • Texas State Highway 114 (east-west)
  • Texas State Highway 183 (east-west)
  • Texas State Highway 121 (north-south)

(List of Dallas-Fort Worth area freeways)

Public transportation

Ft Worth T bus
"The T" bus in Ft. Worth, April 2005

The Fort Worth Transportation Authority, better known as The T, serves Fort Worth with dozens of different bus routes throughout the city, including a downtown bus circulator known as Molly the Trolley. The T operates buses in the suburbs of Richland Hills (route 41) and Arlington (MAX).

In 2010, Fort Worth won a $25 million Federal Urban Circulator grant to build a streetcar system. In December 2010, though, the city council forfeited the grant by voting to end the streetcar study.

Rail transportation

  • The Trinity Railway Express is a commuter rail line that connects downtown Fort Worth with downtown Dallas and several suburban stations between the two major cities.
  • Two Amtrak routes stop at the Fort Worth Intermodal Transportation Center: The Heartland Flyer and Texas Eagle.

Airports

  • Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport is a major commercial airport located between the major cities of Fort Worth and Dallas. DFW Airport is the world's third-busiest airport based on operations and tenth-busiest airport based on passengers.

Prior to the construction of DFW, the city was served by Greater Southwest International Airport, which was located just to the south of the new airport. Originally named Amon Carter Field after one of the city's influential mayors, Greater Southwest opened in 1953 and operated as the primary airport for Fort Worth until 1974. It was then abandoned until the terminal was torn down in 1980. The site of the former airport is now a mixed-use development straddled by Texas State Highway 183 and 360. One small section of runway remains north of Highway 183, and serves as the only reminder that a major commercial airport once occupied the site.

Fort Worth is home to these four airports within city limits:

  • Fort Worth Alliance Airport
  • Fort Worth Meacham International Airport
  • Fort Worth Spinks Airport
  • Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base Fort Worth

Walkability

A 2011 study by Walk Score ranked Fort Worth 47th-most walkable of 50 largest U.S. cities.

Biking

The Fort Worth Bike Sharing is a nonprofit organization that controls Fort Worth B-Cycle, a bike-sharing program introduced to the area on April 22, 2013. There are 45 stations across the city with 350 bikes available for rent all day, every day of the year. These areas include Downtown, the Cultural District, the Trinity Trails, the Stockyards, Near Southside and on TCU's campus. Their mission is to "enhance our community by providing an affordable, efficient, environmentally-friendly bike share program that complements our existing public transportation system and provides both residents and visitors a healthy, convenient way to move around our city".

Sister cities

Fort Worth is a part of the Sister Cities International program and maintains cultural and economic exchange programs with its eight sister cities.

Images for kids


Fort Worth, Texas Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.